Types of Torts

Business Torts

Torts that could be part of a civil conspiracy include unfair competition, wrongful interference with a business relationship, or any other business tort. Intimidation is both an economic and intentional tort. It happens when a person threatens to engage in unlawful conduct, backed up by a specific threat or demands.

Several types of torts can be a part of a civil conspiracy. Often these torts arise in a business setting and are called business torts. Some examples are unfair competition, wrongful interference with a business relationship, and fraud.

Unfair competition is when a business uses a market advantage through deceptive or wrongful business practices to cause injury or damages to either its consumers or competitors. For example, suppose company A and company B are the only two local suppliers of a particular product. They agree to set the price at a certain level to ensure profitability. This is called price fixing or collusion. It is a form of unfair competition, and it hurts consumers and potential market competitors. Because company A and company B have intended to enter into this unlawful conduct, it becomes a civil conspiracy.

Wrongful interference with a business relationship, which is also called tortious interference with contract, happens when one person or business entity—knowingly, unjustly, and without being invited to—intervenes in a known contractual relationship, causing one party to breach or terminate its agreement and cause damages.

For instance, company A knows that Employee John at company B is subject to an employment agreement and a confidentiality agreement. Nonetheless, company A offers him a higher salary to break those agreements, and he does so. He reveals company B's secrets to company A and leaves company B needing to quickly find a replacement for him.

The blame here could be shared. Both company A and John could be found liable for a civil conspiracy (a wrongful action with injury caused to another) to interfere with company B's economic or contractual rights.

Finally, there is fraud, the making of intentional misrepresentations with the intent that those misrepresentations be relied on. The injured party must have relied on those false statements, and the result must be some form of damages.

Intimidation is both an economic and intentional tort. It happens when a person threatens to engage in unlawful conduct, backed up by some specific threat or demand. For example, Imani threatens someone that she will breach an agreement unless that other person takes a certain step. The person then acts because of Imani's threat and is injured by taking this action.