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MATH 8 Calculus With Analytic Geometry I

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    A Few Big Assignments

    Great Intro to the Subject

    Participation Counts

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    • Profile picture
    Nov 14, 2016
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    Professor Runnion has a very good overall balance between explanations in Calculus and doing the examples. I enjoy how he is very passionate in his work and how he puts life into Calculus. He makes the lectures exciting and tells real world applications of how people could use Calculus every day.

    Course highlights:

    One of my favorite lessons was over making a function into a solid object by revolving the function around an axis: you can apply it to the real world. For example, one could plug a function into a CNC lathe and turn a piece of wood to an exact curvy shape (like the railings on a banister for example). Another highlight was optimization problems on one of our tests. I've found out that one should know math well enough to be creative with it. I was trying to optimize a speed problem once and I had no clue what I was doing, I eventually guessed logically and worked with the only equations I could think of. I earned most of the points because I created my own way in a logical manner. If a person can be creative, look at a problem at a different angle and solve it, often time than not a student will still get credit for it.

    Hours per week:

    3-5 hours

    Advice for students:

    Make sure you know the major derivative and antiderivative rules. Put in at least 2 hours a night and practice every chance you get.

    • Fall 2016
    • runnion,paul
    • Yes
    • Great Intro to the Subject A Few Big Assignments Participation Counts

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