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PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophical Problems

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  • Professor:
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    Sullivan, Candelaria, N/A, KarenFoss, Staff, CarolynA.Thomas, ChristianC.Wood, DeanA.Yannias, EthanA.Mills, JonathanConescu, PhillipD.Williamson, TylerHildebrand, EllieVanMill, IainD.Thomson, George Sieg, James Walter Bodington, John DuFour
  • Average Course Rating (from 4 Students)

    4.5/5
    Overall Rating Breakdown
    • 4 Advice
    • 5
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    • 3
      25%
    • 2
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    • 1
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  • Course Difficulty Rating

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    • Medium 50%

    • Hard 50%

  • Top Course Tags

    Always Do the Reading

    Great Intro to the Subject

    A Few Big Assignments

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    • Profile picture
    Nov 29, 2016
    | No strong feelings either way.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    The course is simple, and allows you to think outside the box, however class is quite relaxed. Classroom discussion tends to go off topic. Not recommended to those who desire a well-structed environment with powerpoints and lesson plans. In this course more is learned through the readings rather than through class discussion.

    Course highlights:

    Descartes will leave an everlasting impression. You'll discuss controversial topics like Abortion, Religion, and Euthanasia. You'll start to question everthing, especially your own exsitence. Half the time you'll not know what's going on, while a few of your peers will be indepthly involved in discussion. The readings can be hard to understand and most likely require you to read it a couple of times. Despite this they are typically two to five pages long. Also be mindful of the grammar and clarity of your writing.

    Hours per week:

    3-5 hours

    Advice for students:

    Read all the readings due that week or you won't understand what's going on during class.

    • Fall 2016
    • John DuFour
    • Always Do the Reading Many Small Assignments Final Paper
    • Profile picture
    Oct 05, 2016
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    Jim is a very interesting professor! He thoroughly explains all the concepts so that I know exactly what the philosophers are explaining.

    Course highlights:

    The highlights of this course were the lectures. That is what most of the class consisted of, so I never had any homework other than reading. I learned about what the philosopher's ideas in their essays meant.

    Hours per week:

    3-5 hours

    Advice for students:

    Read the book and reference the syllabus every week! The professor will not tell us what our homework is because all of the readings are listed on the syllabus.

    • Fall 2016
    • James Walter Bodington
    • Yes
    • Great Intro to the Subject Always Do the Reading Participation Counts
    • Profile picture
    May 03, 2016
    | Would highly recommend.

    This class was tough.

    Course Overview:

    The professor was as engaging as he was instructive. The teaching style was discussion based without feeling intimidating. The class itself was very rigorous, but the professor was able to instill such a strong interest in the subject material that I completely forgot about the workload and just dived in.

    Course highlights:

    A complete historical overview of philosophy and the theory behind it.

    Hours per week:

    9-11 hours

    Advice for students:

    It's philosophy after all, you need to know why you are taking the course or you wont find it fulfilling. Try and remember all the practical applications for the course material. After all it was Socrates that said, "The unexamined life is not worth living."

    • Spring 2015
    • George Sieg
    • Yes

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