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Human Origins Advice

  • Average Rating (from 2 Students)

    4.5/5
    Overall Rating Breakdown
    • 2 Advice
    • 5
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    • 3
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    • 2
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    • 1
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  • Course Difficulty

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  • Top Course Tags

    Great Intro to the Subject

    A Few Big Assignments

    Always Do the Reading

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    • Profile picture
    Jan 14, 2017
    | Would recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    While I would recommend this class, one should exert caution to my opinion. Whether you are looking for a simple general-education course to take, or an Anthropology class that can provide an interesting look into cultures around the world, this is a good class to take. This review comes to you in five parts. FIRST, the Professor. Prof. John Poggie of URI is a good teacher. He can be a little slow at times, and may have trouble hearing you, but his diagrams are useful and he makes taking class notes easy. Prof. Poggie chose to use the 3rd Edition of "Human Adaptive Strategies: Ecology, Culture, and Politics". This book is about 225 pages long and divided into eight chapters. This textbook is especially good for comparing the different methods of Agriculture humans have employed over the millennia and how their culture and behavior has been shaped around those given methods. (Foraging & Horticulture to Industrialism & Globalism) It fundamentally explores why there is an association between adaptation of agricultural method and adaptation of behavior. SECOND, exams. You CANNOT//CANNOT escape reading the textbook if you want to do VERY well on the exams. He covers quite a few cultures in class but does NOT//NOT cover every culture in class. And he expects you to have some familiarity with all cultures covered in the textbook. You will want to make a flip-book of every culture discussed in the book to help get familiar with each culture. This will be overwhelming if you do not start early. You can get away with a decent exam grade if you skim the cultures info, but I would not recommend doing that. If you are an Anthropology Major, it would probably be more than 'helpful' to make such a flip-book. Also, exams will cover what is discussed in class (cultures/terms/concepts) and what is seen in the book (cultures/terms/concepts). Everything covered in class will necessarily be in the book. Everything in the book will NOT//NOT necessarily be covered in the class. THIRD, essays. You must complete two major essays during the semester. Each essay should focus on one culture in depth. This will help you understand how to write about another culture from a "culturally relativistic" standpoint. These are graded as a "Plus-Plus" (100%), otherwise noted as "Perfect/Very Good", a "Plus-Minus" (70%), otherwise noted as "Decent, you can revise it once, if you would like to.", and finally a "Minus" (50%), otherwise noted as "Meh, needs to be revised. You get one chance to revise it." You will watch movies to get extra insights into a culture's behavior in preparation for the essays. When I took the class, he suggested that you do NOT//NOT use outside resources for the essays. He said there was enough information in the book, the movie, and the lectures to do a solid essay. There is no defined page limit, that is to say, he wants you to do "A thorough job" without having to be given a page minimum or maximum. Just for clarification, not handing in an essay does not get you a "Minus" (50%). Naturally, not handing in an essay gets you 0%. Sorry. FOURTH, Movies!! This Lecture style class will present you every day with a lecture, a movie, or a movie with a short lecture. Most of the movies takes the entire class to watch. You get a choice as to what culture you would like to write about for the essays, and he will show many movies during the semester. Pick wisely, but once you pick a culture, take good notes from the movie. You do not have to take notes for every movie, but it might be wise to take notes for two movies, so you have a choice if you change your mind. FIFTH, Miscellaneous. -No group projects. (I didn't have any, anyways). -No quizzes. (I didn't have any, anyways). -Attendance A MUST. (Sorry). -Participation makes you look good, but I don't think it counts. (This helps if you need a few days extra over the due date for the exams, but you have to participate A LOT if you want to get noticed in this way). -Sit at the front. (If you participate AND sit at the front, you have much better chances at getting a few extra days on that late essay; Sitting at the front on its own doesn't do much for you other than being able to hear him (HE SPEAKS QUIETLY)). ***This review is based off my experience taking Prof. Poggie's APG 203 Class at URI in the Fall Semester of 2016.

    Course highlights:

    I don't know about you, but I found it very interesting to study other cultures around the world. My interest was especially sparked when I learned of the title for the textbook I was to use for the class: "Human Adaptive Strategies: Ecology, Culture, and Politics". The politics aspect is very interesting to me. This class definitely offers insight into the politics of foreign cultures (that is, cultures outside of the U.S.A.) as well as some study into the politics of the USA. Another highlight of the class are the movies. After a few weeks in the class, you will begin to watch many movies about different cultures and movies with focused topics such as marriage, social organization, and religion. ***This review is based off my experience taking Prof. Poggie's APG 203 Class at URI in the Fall Semester of 2016.

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    CLAIM YOUR SEAT AT THE FRONT OF CLASS. You will NOT//NOT hear him if you are at the back in a large lecture room. Yeah, you'll be able to goof off, but he does say valuable stuff. Please begin reading your textbook early. He will NOT//NOT tell you when to begin reading and provides no specific reading schedule for you. He provides a reading schedule, but it is wicked general. The book is roughly 225 pages and eight chapters. My suggestion would be to read a chapter every week. When I say "Please do the reading", I am not suggesting you sit there and read every word very carefully. Just read fairly quickly (WITHOUT MISSING WORDS), grabbing all the terms, some of the concepts, and a very general overview of each culture. If you can provide a general understanding of each culture, while using the given terms in the corresponding chapter, in under 4 minutes, you should do well on the essays and exams. ***This review is based off my experience taking Prof. Poggie's APG 203 Class at URI in the Fall Semester of 2016.

    • Fall 2016
    • John Poggie
    • Great Intro to the Subject Always Do the Reading A Few Big Assignments
    • Profile picture
    May 26, 2016
    | Would highly recommend.

    Pretty easy, overall.

    Course Overview:

    Before I took this course, I had little to no interest in anthropology. However, Professor Dunsworth is easily now my favorite teacher, and I'd gladly take more of her classes. Her enthusiasm and passion for her area of interest is absolutely infectious. You will have a lot of fun in this class if you put in a decent effort.

    Course highlights:

    Professor Dusworth's lectures were the biggest and best part of her class. She was informative, funny and supplemented her lectures with hands-on examples and models. She also included notes for each day so if you spaced out or missed a day it was actually pretty hard to get lost or fall behind. Dunsworth is able to connect to her students and make awkward topics like reproduction and religion in anthropology approachable. I learned a lot about the issues within the scientific community on top of gaining clarification for a lot of misconceptions about evolution.

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    Although a pretty easy class, there is still effort involved. Your biggest grade will be a portfolio of assignments you should have done throughout the year. Try not to check out too often and keep up with your reading and work. The assignments are simple and you'll be glad when you aren't rushing to do everything at the last minute (like me). This is a great class to cover a natural science gen ed.

    • Fall 2016
    • HollyDunsworth
    • Yes
    • Great Intro to the Subject Many Small Assignments Great Discussions


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