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ENGL 2325 GREAT WORKS OF LITERATURE II

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  • Top Course Tags

    Always Do the Reading

    Great Discussions

    Lots of Writing

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    • Profile picture
    Aug 10, 2016
    | Would highly recommend.

    This class was tough.

    Course Overview:

    Unfortunately, the course/ class number and such do not line up since I took this class as a highschool student (I received duel credit hours in medieval and renaissance history instead). Also, Dr. Bartel no longer works at HBU, but the course material was fantastic. This is one of four years of this course, which starts in Greece and ends in modern works of the 20th century. As a highschool student, this course was spread over two semesters, where we read around fifty texts from Beowulf and Song of Roland to Machiavelli's prince, as well as Shakespeare. It was a dense and well rounded class, focusing on great works of philosophy, fact, and folklore. We would read the entire work and be given thought provoking question to discuss as a class. At the end of each semester, we would choose one or two texts from our curriculum and argue a point or link we found interesting, such as government comparisons between Machiavelli and Plato, or the importance of King Arthur as a Democratic ruler instead of a Monarch.

    Course highlights:

    I loved the discussions. They were tough questions that would make the two hours of class fly past in a few minutes. The class is taught by a professor, but includes only highschoolers. It was amazing the maturity level of these peers compared to those in the University classes. I went home every day with my fire fueled by intriguing questions. Because of the independence and responsibility the students are given, I am more confident, better informed, and have improved both the quality and speed of my writing.

    Hours per week:

    9-11 hours

    Advice for students:

    Even in the college version of this course, being condensed and less packed with reading material, do not let yourself fall behind. Get ahead in reading anytime you can, and use that time to begin assembling your thesis paper. Always write down your thoughts in a notebook or in the text. It will help you locate text for class discussions faster when defending your side in class, as well as provide valuable and required textual evidence for your thesis paper. Another good thing about these classes is that they are cumulative. The more semesters you take of this series and related subject classes, the more ammunition you'll have for both papers and class discussions. And it is very likely the professors will allow you to use this "outside knowledge" in their course. Expect a lot of outside hours on this course.

    • Fall 2014
    • Timothy Bartel
    • Lots of Writing Always Do the Reading Great Discussions

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