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PHIL 2303 Introduction to Logic

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    • Profile picture
    Jan 14, 2017
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    The professor made the class! I cannot give him enough credit to make something like "tu quoque" interesting. The reading were sometimes "boring" but his lectures had you covered.

    Course highlights:

    When going over fallacies, some of the examples were hilarious. The stories he would share that went along with lecture were pretty interesting. It didn't matter if you were running on 2 hours of sleep, this class was fun!

    Hours per week:

    3-5 hours

    Advice for students:

    Take notes, make flash cards, ask questions, and have fun with it.

    • Fall 2016
    • TimCowan
    • Yes
    • Great Intro to the Subject Many Small Assignments Great Discussions
    • Profile picture
    Apr 29, 2016
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    A solid understanding of and the ability to use logic would be of benefit to any student (or any living human), and offers practical, real-life applications, and would add value in any major, course of study, or occupation.

    Course highlights:

    Professor Cowan is unquestionably a highlight of this course. He is knowledgeable, highly entertaining, and very accessible. He takes time to check in with students throughout lectures, to ensure that everyone is grasping the lesson at hand, and has no problem with going over and over the material in as many different ways as necessary until understanding comes. In this class, I have learned how to formulate and evaluate arguments, how to identify common fallacies, and how to examine forms of arguments for validity. In the immediate short-term, this has caused me to become more aware of the things I say and hear, and to think more carefully before speaking, to ensure that I am expressing myself clearly and accurately. In addition, I have learned to listen more carefully to everything, from advertisements to political messages to personal conversations.

    Hours per week:

    9-11 hours

    Advice for students:

    Practice practice practice! The concepts initially sound very strange, but the more they are practiced and used, the more they make sense and begin to come more naturally. It is helpful to do the exercises in the text, even if they're not assigned. Also practicing "translating" ordinary things heard throughout the day helps to build familiarity with new ideas.

    • Spring 2016
    • TimCowan
    • Great Intro to the Subject Participation Counts Great Discussions
    • Profile picture
    Nov 17, 2015
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    The prof makes this class fun and challenging at the same time. Group cooperation is encouraged and pushes you to new heights before you know it! Watts is a sarcastic and charismatic guy with an affinity for teaching and encouragement. Don't pass up the chance to take this class! (For many majors you can use this course as a math substitute)

    Course highlights:

    I have learned how to break down an argument into logical form and determine whether or not it is sound. I can translate someone's argument into an equation! Will definitely help in any career involving contact with people as you can determine who's reasoning you should listen to.

    Hours per week:

    3-5 hours

    Advice for students:

    Make sure to practice proofing over an over again. Be prepared to think critically and work with people (I actually met my girlfriend in this class haha). Don't think of it as math if that scares you, just think of it as philosophy.

    • Fall 2015
    • ProfessorWelsh
    • Participation Counts Competitive Classmates Great Discussions

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