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  • 13 terms

    Term:

    1) What is a channel rhodopsin and from which organism did it come from?

    Definition:

    Answer: Channel rhodopsins are light sensitive rhodopsins used by algae to orient to light.

    • Study Questions for Engineering a Fear Memory
    • 13 terms
    • Vocabulary for Study Questions for Engineering a Fear Memory. Find, create, and access Neuroscience, Long-term potentiation, NMDA flashcards with Course Hero.
  • 12 terms

    Term:

    synaptic transmission

    Definition:

    how information is conveyed from one neuron to the next

    • Chapter 8 Vocabulary
    • 12 terms
    • Vocabulary for Chapter 8 Vocabulary. Find, create, and access postsynaptic neuron, flashcards with Course Hero.
  • 12 terms

    Term:

    1) What is an excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP)?

    Definition:

    Answer- The depolarization of the postsynaptic cell in response to the release of transmitter a the presynaptic neuron at a synaptic site. It is called excitatory because the depolarization of the membrane tends to drive the membrane potential closer or even to threshold for an action potential.

    • Chapter 8 Study Questions
    • 12 terms
    • Vocabulary for Chapter 8 Study Questions. Find, create, and access EPSP, positive charges, excitatory input, flashcards with Course Hero.
  • 16 terms

    Term:

    1) What is required to open AMPA receptors and allow the influx of positive charges and thus membrane depolarization?

    Definition:

    Answer- AMPA receptors open when they bind glutamate.

    • Chapter 13 Study Questions
    • 16 terms
    • Vocabulary for Chapter 13 Study Questions. Find, create, and access Enzyme, Chemical synapse, Long-term potentiation, flashcards with Course Hero.
  • 12 terms

    Term:

    1) What are the three criteria for establishing that a chemical is a neurotransmitter?

    Definition:

    Answer- 1) nerve stimulation must cause the release of the substance and the release must be shown to come from the nerve. 2) the effects of nerve stimulation are mimicked by applying the suspected transmitter directly to the postsynaptic cell; 3) nerve-evoked and extrinsic application responses must display the same pharmacology, i.e. response to various drugs.

    • Chapter 11-12 Questions
    • 12 terms
    • Vocabulary for Chapter 11-12 Questions. Find, create, and access Neuroscience, Otto Loewi, ACh receptors, muscarinic ACh receptors, flashcards with Course Hero.
  • 12 terms

    Term:

    1) Explain how metabotropic receptors work.

    Definition:

    Answer- Metabotropic receptors do NOT have an ion pore but rather are coupled to a G-protein. That protein has three subunits, an alpha, a beta and a gamma subunit. The beta-gamma subunits operate jointly as a dimmer. The protein is normally is coupled to a molecule of guanosine diphosphate (GDP). When transmitter binds to the receptor, the receptor dislodges the GDP and take on a molecule of guanosine triphosphate (GTP). The GTP activates the protein causing the alpha subunit to dissociate from the beta-gamma unit. The dissociated units of the protein then exert effects downstream from the receptor.

    • Chapter 14 Questions
    • 12 terms
    • Vocabulary for Chapter 14 Questions. Find, create, and access Neuroscience, CBI, Gill, Aplysia, Hyperpolarize, flashcards with Course Hero.
  • 10 terms

    Term:

     

    Definition:

    Answer- The mepp is the response recorded at the endplate when the axon of the motor neuron is NOT stimulated. It is the unit response due to the spontaneous. release of a packet or quantum of transmitter. An electrode in the endplate will record mepps of various amplitudes, but the variations are very small and deviate only slightly from the mean amplitude, which is 0.4 mV. The different amplitudes are due to the spontaneous release of transmitter from different boutons on the axon terminal, where some are slightly closer to the electrode, giving a larger response, while others are slightly farther from the electrode, giving a slightly smaller response. It is just random variation around a mean value.

    • Chapter 10 Study Question
    • 10 terms
    • Vocabulary for Chapter 10 Study Question. Find, create, and access Neuroscience, Transmitter, Botox, snares, Synaptotagmin, flashcards with Course Hero.
  • 8 terms

    Term:

    1) List two major differences between a voltage-gated ion channel and a ligand-gated ion channel.

    Definition:

    Answer- Obviously, voltage gated ion channels are opened by the charge on the inside of the neuron while ligand gated channels are opened by a chemical neurotransmitter. In addition, voltage gated channels, at least the type we have discussed in class so far, are located all along the axon or, in the case of voltage gated Ca++ channels at the axon terminal, while ligand gated channels are located in the dendrites and cell body, at the site of the synaptic connection with the presynaptic axon.

    • Chapter 9 Study Questions
    • 8 terms
    • Vocabulary for Chapter 9 Study Questions. Find, create, and access reversal potential, flashcards with Course Hero.

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