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  • Average Course Rating (from 4 Students)

    3.0/5
    Overall Rating Breakdown
    • 4 Advice
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      50%
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      25%
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    • Medium 25%

    • Hard 75%

  • Top Course Tags

    Great Intro to the Subject

    Lots of Writing

    Requires Lots of Research

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    • Profile picture
    Jan 31, 2017
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    First, Doctor Ellis is a great professor. He is able to give so much information, while keeping the class captivated. Second, you will learn a lot of information in this course, without having to do a lot of hard studying. Lastly, this coursed is required for architecture and interior design majors, so you have to take it, and there is only one professor teaching it in the fall, which is Professor Ellis.

    Course highlights:

    This course is going to teach you everything you need to know about the history of architecture before the Renaissance. That sounds like a lot of information, but Doctor Ellis splits it up in to weekly lectures that are easy to understand and current to today's design. Personally my favorite part of the course was Ancient Egyptian and Ancient Greek architecture, but you'll learn so much more!

    Hours per week:

    3-5 hours

    Advice for students:

    Doctor Ellis will give you everything you need to be successful in the course. He gives out review sheet for the test, with flash cards that are on the test verbatim. If you memorize all the flash cards your already at a 50% on the test. After that all you need to do is go over the short answer questions and essay questions, which again Doctor Ellis gives you except he does not give you the answers, but you should be know the answers because he goes over all of them in the lectures. So, if you go to class, take notes, and pay attention, you should have no problem passing the course.

    • Fall 2016
    • CliftonEllis
    • Yes
    • Great Intro to the Subject Participation Counts Great Discussions
    • Profile picture
    May 02, 2016
    | Would highly recommend.

    This class was tough.

    Course Overview:

    This course is extremely difficult if you do not have proper study techniques. It will force you to think differently, and actually know and understand the material. Professor Ellis is an amazing professor and I have learned so much. This class will kick your but you learn more than the material. I HIGHLY recommend it if you're wanting a challenge.

    Course highlights:

    The highlights are just being around Professor Ellis, he is great and super funny. I learned just about as much as you can learn about the 14th-19th Century. He forces you to actually know the material instead of memorizing it for tests.

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    Only take this course if you are serious about school, slackers will not last more than the first exam.

    • Spring 2016
    • CliftonEllis
    • Yes
    • Background Knowledge Expected Lots of Writing Requires Lots of Research
    • Profile picture
    Mar 09, 2016
    | No strong feelings either way.

    This class was tough.

    Course Overview:

    If you are an architecture major, this class is a must. It explains the history and development of architecture from early man to the Middle Ages. However, if you are not an architecture major, this class might be too much. It is extremely writing intensive, which makes this sophomore level class feel like a senior level class. If you are looking for an easy humanities credit, this is not it.

    Course highlights:

    This class explains the history and development of architecture from early man to the Middle Ages. You learn about basic construction methods still in use today, like post and lintel, the arch, etc., and why certain architectural styles were and still are significant.

    Hours per week:

    3-5 hours

    Advice for students:

    Make friends with the librarian!

    • Fall 2015
    • BrianZugay
    • Yes
    • Great Intro to the Subject Lots of Writing Requires Lots of Research

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