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PETR 2311 Petrophysics

  • School:
    *
  • Professor:
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    Dr.Holley, T.HOLLEY, Dr. Holley, dr holly, khoury, Dr Hatzignatiou, Dimitrios Hatzignatiou
  • Average Course Rating (from 8 Students)

    4.8/5
    Overall Rating Breakdown
    • 8 Advice
    • 5
      75%
    • 4
      25%
    • 3
      0%
    • 2
      0%
    • 1
      0%
  • Course Difficulty Rating

    • Easy 0%

    • Medium 75%

    • Hard 25%

  • Top Course Tags

    Math-heavy

    Go to Office Hours

    Great Discussions

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    • Profile picture
    Dec 16, 2016
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    First PE course, you learn A LOT. Both fun, and challenging. None of the concepts are difficult, but you cover a lot of material. Dr. Holley taught this course for 3 years, and we were Dr. Hatzignatiou's guinny pigs. Hopefully things will be smoother next semester, but I'll say that the class started with 130 or so people and maybe 45 were left in the end. Of those left, I'm guessing half passed. However, it's not hard, it just requires a lot of work/memorization. You have to practice problems on your own (chegg, course hero, etc) if you want to make an A. Understanding the homework will get you a B.

    Course highlights:

    Topics covered: porosity, fluid saturation, viscosity, boyle's law, flow through pipes (poiseuille's law), flow through rocks (darcy's law), capillary pressure, j-function, gas permeability/viscosity, gas darcy's law, electrical resistivity (archie's law), wiley's time travel avg

    Hours per week:

    12+ hours

    Advice for students:

    Quizzes: There are approximately 10 quizzes at the beginning of lecture (count towards 10% of your grade). Review the slides from the previous lecture right before class. Memorize any formulas and concepts such as wettability depends on: x,y,z etc. If you learned a formula, make sure you can apply it in its most basic form. Quizzes are simple and check to see if you've been paying attention, basically. [there is an intro quiz to test background knowledge the first day of class - its weighted equally with the others. You can find it on course hero] Homework: Homework counts as 10%. DO and make sure you UNDERSTAND the homework. Don't copy off others. If you have to, then go back and redo the homework. Half of our exam questions were pulled directly from homework problems. It can take a while, so allocate your time appropriately and don't wait till the day before to start working on it. If you don't understand something, go to the profs office hours or ask the TA. Himanshu is graduating this semester, but hopefully the next TA will be as helpful as he was, and usually better at explaining things. You can also email them. Go to workshop. It's held twice a week and usually covers the previous or upcoming homework. It is a good time to get homework help/ clarify any concepts that you don't understand. Also, the prof will sometimes be there and if he works a problem, its likely to show up on a test. Pay special attention to problems the prof chooses to work in class and in workshop. They usually show up on exams. Know your units. I think this tripped a lot of people up at first - however, once you understand which system to use it becomes very simple. I'm going to upload a chart that will hopefully clarify things. Make note cards -for units, formulas, theory, etc. If you don't understand something, don't hope that it won't be on the exam. I saw this happen to a few people. The issue is, if you miss one problem you automatically start with a 75. Yes, there is a lot of material, so some of it you will never be tested over. But you still have to know everything. How to prepare for exams: -first (most important), re-do the homework, quizzes, and problems from lecture slides. If you can do this you're set for at least 50% of the exam. -second, go to course hero and look up previous exams from Dr. Holley. Dr. Hatzignatious' exams are different, but all three had one question that was DIRECTLY from a previous Holley exam. It won't be anything you've done in the homework. The idea is to work as many of these problems as you can so when he throws something at you that you haven't seen before, you have seen it. -Make sure you're solid on problems before moving on to theory. Tests have 2-3 problems. You can miss some theory, but if you don't know how to do a problem, you're screwed. Also, theory is difficult to prepare for because it can be literally ANYTHING from any of the slides. Final: The final was easy (nothing that hadn't been covered in homework or done in class). Theory was minimal and basic. Maybe he'll make it harder next semester, I think he wanted to make sure people passed. It is comprehensive but more weight is given to the last lectures not on exams 1&2 (j-function, relative permeability, electrical resistivity/archies law, wiley's time travel avg) Preparing for final: I definitely over-prepared, however, wasn't sure how difficult he was going to make it. I started studying the week before, but recommend starting sooner if you can. This is because you'll have other finals to study for, and will need to review everything you've covered that semester in addition to the new material. The sooner you start, the less stressed you'll be. What I didn't do, but wish I had: Made flash cards for theory. Not waited till week before final to start reviewing/ worked old problems continuously throughout semester Took better notes Reviewed notes after class Not missed any homework assignments/ quizzes (it adds up!) That's it. I really hope this helps someone. I saw a lot of people struggle and not make it. I think the main thing is to know what to expect on exams and how to prepare for them.

    • Fall 2016
    • Dr Hatzignatiou
    • Yes
    • Great Intro to the Subject Go to Office Hours
    • Profile picture
    Mar 22, 2017
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    Best professor there is! Explains everything to the smallest detail so you understand the topics

    Course highlights:

    I learned the basics needed for the rest of petroleum engineering classes

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    Study and ask questions on any problem.

    • Fall 2015
    • Dr. Holley
    • Yes
    • Math-heavy Great Intro to the Subject Great Discussions
    • Profile picture
    Mar 22, 2017
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    Really good professor, tells you what you need, cares about the students learning

    Course highlights:

    Porosity permeability viscosity

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    Attend class, do hw, read lectures

    • Fall 2015
    • dr holly
    • Yes
    • Math-heavy Great Intro to the Subject

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