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SOCY 100 INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY

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    Leszek J. Sibilski, Tracie L. Witte, Professor Melissa Gouge, vincent clincy, GregoryM.Sember, BenedictNgala, TakikoMori-Saunders
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    Always Do the Reading

    Great Discussions

    Participation Counts

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    • Profile picture
    Aug 14, 2017
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    This course allows for the debate of politics in an environment where every participant does not have to worry about the judgement of others. Aside from that, the course is very reliant on the students' participation, meaning that in is very engaging and seldom boring.

    Course highlights:

    The highlights of this course were honestly the debates everyday. The professor will begin by introducing a situation and the controversy surrounding the legality of said situation; after this the students will debate over whether or not the choices are right or wrong. The teacher will intervene to add more information, or if the decision is unanimous, he will play devil's advocate in order to stimulate discussion. These debates expose us to new perspectives, and as a result it helps us widen our own. Even if we do not agree with another's view, discussion will help one understand their view and respect it. Not only does this allow the students to gain knowledge, but it helps eliminate bias and making one more open-minded.

    Hours per week:

    3-5 hours

    Advice for students:

    It is f the utmost importance that students in this course stay up to date on their textbook readings. and that they review the in-class situations. The situations discussed in class will serve as a the information needed on the exams and essays. The textbook will provide specific rules on the legality of certain situations, and the exams will gauge how well you know these legal parameters. The situations debated in class, and their outcomes, will serve as a substantial part of the exam's questions. Taking notes on the situations and reviewing the articles are just as important as reading the textbook. If the student does both of these things, they essentially ensure that they will receive a good grade.

    • Fall 2016
    • GregoryM.Sember
    • Yes
    • A Few Big Assignments Participation Counts Great Discussions
    • Profile picture
    Aug 08, 2017
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    I would definitely recommend this course

    Course highlights:

    This course gives you an understanding of the society we live in, different topics of interest are taught in this course which help to shape opinions and ideas concerning the happenings in our societies. Thought-provoking and interesting.

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    Read all the texts and ask for help if you need it. Do all the assignments and turn them in as soon as you can

    • Summer 2017
    • vincent clincy
    • Yes
    • Great Intro to the Subject Lots of Writing Great Discussions
    • Profile picture
    Dec 23, 2016
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    There is a saying when it comes to sociology. It goes "Don't study Sociology if you want to be happy." Why? "It's because you will become aware of a lot of societal problems and you will find yourself always questioning the things we do and take for granted." It's a bit of a mouthful but it holds true, nevertheless. Since I've finished the class, I've found myself questioning so many things that I'd rather not. Things such as gender issues, racial inequality and an incredible amount of other themes that were once normal to me are now glaringly obvious.

    Course highlights:

    Over the course of this class, I have become increasingly negative or pessimistic of the world and people-in-general to the point it's almost depressing. When I try to offer sociological explanations for events or try to see them from a more critical point of view I am ignored. I've come to the understanding that people don't like the idea that we have some responsibility for issues like this. I feel there's a lot of truth or at least insight from the Sociological way of looking at things, but people seem to roll their eyes whenever it gets mentioned.

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    Start early! Seriously, when you get told about that test or paper begin that night. Do a little bit each day and then a quick review two days before. I also find pictures help me, so try drawing pictures on flash cards. Study regularly, look to understand something and commit it to long term memory. The only way you will be able to do this is to study it regularly. 5-6 times minimum, it might just be refreshing your memory after the first time but you need to do it. I use conceptual maps in order to make regularly studying something much much faster and easier. This is vastly superior to linear walls of text or masses of notes. One of the many reasons I would not recommend a laptop for note taking, paper is more flexible and more reliable. Have a set number of hours per week and a rough routine, for example at university you want to be dedicating minimum 40 hours a week to study for top marks. Fit it around your life but set some hours you'll study to most of the time.

    • Fall 2016
    • Professor Melissa Gouge
    • Always Do the Reading Many Small Assignments Participation Counts


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