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NRES 295 ECOHYDROLOGY

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  • Top Course Tags

    Go to Office Hours

    Great Intro to the Subject

    Math-heavy

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    • Profile picture
    Mar 01, 2017
    | No strong feelings either way.

    This class was tough.

    Course Overview:

    Disclaimer: The new professor as of Fall 2016 was Adrian Harpold, I could't submit this without putting a professor's name down, so I chose a random one. This course was awesome, Adrian knew the material extremely well. The only downsides to this course were the 6-8 hour Excel homework assignments had nothing to do with anything on the exams, the study guides for the exam barely reflected what was on the exam, and Adrian tended to teach us as if we were working for him in research. As far as introduction classes go, this was quite the opposite. I'm glad to say I know Excel really well though.

    Course highlights:

    Learned about where we get our water from and various equations and aspects to ecohydrology. We had lectures with multiple heads and presidents of various water authority agencies that gave us a run down on certain policies that were in effect during the drought and how water is distributed among Reno and neighboring cities in California.

    Hours per week:

    9-11 hours

    Advice for students:

    Go to the TA's office hours, homework is literally impossible without it. One example of the homework problems was determining incoming solar energy, get that in Watts per meter squared, then determine how much water that energy would melt, and convert that into millimeters of water. It also gets harder than that, perks of a science major!

    • Fall 2016
    • ABERNATHY,TAMMY
    • Yes
    • Math-heavy Great Intro to the Subject Go to Office Hours

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