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ENGLISH English

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    Korrow, Bowman, Mrs. Hopkins
  • Average Course Rating (from 3 Students)

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    • 3 Advice
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  • Course Difficulty Rating

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    • Medium 67%

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  • Top Course Tags

    Always Do the Reading

    Great Discussions

    Final Paper

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    • Profile picture
    Jun 26, 2017
    | Would highly recommend.

    Pretty easy, overall.

    Course Overview:

    I would like to begin by expressing how lit you are for joining this class. Your year will be infused with the dark forces of Joseph Conrad to the gushy omg – close – your-eyes – they’re – about – to – kiss!! – romantic comedy of Jane Austen. Welcome!! Jumbled with college apps and other hardcore classes, you’ll sometimes want to reach for the quick and handy Shmoop instead of actually reading before reading checks. I get it - we’ve all had our busy (aka procrastinating) days, but it hadn’t occurred to me until near the end of this year that literature is more valuable than I once perceived and the universal themes that always appear are universal for a reason – because they impact our lives to this very day and may even influence your own identity and characterization (pun intended – not as worthy as a Shakespearean pun, but I tried). Have you ever seen the Friends episode in which Joey purchases encyclopedias after realizing how he could almost never understand the intellectually stimulating conversations that his friends had because he didn’t read in high school? Yep, don’t be like Joey in high school – you’ll regret it when you go to college next year and realize you can’t laugh at the same inside jokes with your friends who are talking about Homer. Jokes aside, at the very heart of great literature are life-lessons. Authors like Martha Nusshaum claim that literature, especially of fiction, guide people in their complex lives by presenting them with real-life conundrums and voyages to the ultimate solution of happiness, redemption, or what any human being pursues in life. These novels contain themes, specifically intended to help readers and to reveal to them a truth about life. Don’t you want to be in on the secrets of what great writers and philosophers have already discovered about life as we know it? There have been many articles, however, by esteemed writers for the New York Times like Gregory Currie who are not entirely convinced by the miracle works of great literature without concrete evidence. For me, however, it wasn’t a change in my actions that resulted from reading great literature. Rather, it was my state of mind that had been so greatly influenced. There have been countless instances this year when I highlighted lines in Hamlet and Pride and Prejudice, noting how worthy and inspirational they were to my own life. Take, for example, the poem “Ulysses” by Alfred Tennyson. Though it isn’t considered a “great literary book” by standard, it’s still a part of the AP Lit curriculum. We read this poem around February – when second semester began and senioritis hit. After discussing the poem in class, I promised myself that the last two lines of this poem will forever be ingrained in my mind – “made weak by time and fate, but strong in will/To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield”. I don’t want to spoil this dramatic monologue, but this poem changed my perspective of the rest of senior year and motivated me to continue pursuing what I’ve been passionate for all along rather than let the onset of senioritis take me down. This poem is just one example of how literature has so much value in it, and you’ll definitely get to explore for yourself how inexplicably influential great literature will have on your life – that is, if you choose to read them. If you ever get the chance, enjoy every minute of these works because they’re truly worth it.

    Course highlights:

    The great thing about this course is that it not only exposes you to classical literature - some of which may have profound impacts on your personal and academic lives - but it also teaches you many skills that are transferable to a wide range of other courses you may be taking. It also teaches you how to write and express your ideas. The teacher is also amazing! He's really great at helping you analyze difficult passages, and he teaches you important techniques in writing and in understanding literature.

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    Read the books! The selection of books in this curriculum is fabulous. Sparknoting or shmooping is helpful in analyzing themes and difficult passages, but solely relying on them for discussions or essays is not beneficial, especially when it comes to the final AP exam.

    • Spring 2017
    • Bowman
    • Yes
    • Lots of Writing Always Do the Reading Great Discussions
    • Profile picture
    Feb 18, 2016
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    The class is incredibly fun. We discuss a wide variety of interesting topics and the teacher is very into literature, which adds another to her teaching. The readings are fun and challenging as well.

    Course highlights:

    You develop your writing abilities as well as your ability to analyze and interpret prose and poetry.

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    Make you you read the books. Writing essays and doing assignments is so much easier if your only knowledge isn't from sparknotes.

    • Winter 2016
    • Mrs. Hopkins
    • Yes
    • Always Do the Reading Great Discussions Final Paper
    • Profile picture
    Jan 27, 2016
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    English with Mr. Bowman is really fun. He always has a funny story or twist to take on what we are learning about. He was able to explain Shakespeare to us in a way that was really entertaining, especially to someone who has always been baffled by Shakespearean language.

    Course highlights:

    One highlight was looking at how different filmmakers depicted a famous scene in Hamlet and the different symbolism and techniques they used to get across their points to those who had never read the story and emphasize major themes. I thought this was very interesting and it showed us how Hamlet is relevant outside of the classroom.

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    Be prepared to read the books although at times it may get really long and tedious.

    • Fall 2016
    • Bowman
    • Yes
    • Always Do the Reading Group Projects Great Discussions


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