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SOC 368 Criminology

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Criminology Questions & Answers

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Criminology Questions & Answers


Criminology Advice

  • Average Rating

    4.5/5
    Overall Rating Breakdown
    • 2 Advice
    • 5
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    • 4
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    • 3
      0%
    • 2
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    • 1
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  • Course Difficulty

    • Easy 0%

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    • Hard 50%

  • Top Course Tags

    A Few Big Assignments

    Always Do the Reading

    Final Paper

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    • Profile picture
    Apr 13, 2016
    | Would recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    PJ is one of the best professors that I've ever had. She's very informative and elaborative in all of the course materials.

    Course highlights:

    This course was very informative in terms of criminal knowledge. It's not law school but it will give you a lot of the premature information.

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    Definitely take this course if you're interested in criminal law.

    • Winter 2016
    • PJMcGann
    • Yes
    • Always Do the Reading Final Paper
    • Profile picture
    Apr 12, 2016
    | Would highly recommend.

    This class was tough.

    Course Overview:

    This course challenges many of the basic assumptions people hold about crime and what it means to be a criminal. Crime is a subject that many people hold prior beliefs about, whether they hold those beliefs based on personal or second-hand experience about crime, or even based on portrayals they see on television or in movies. However, rarely do people get a chance to learn the truth about crime. PJ challenges us to think to crime in new ways. Before taking this course, I never knew that the type of crime that costs the society the most, in terms of both money and injury, is white collar crime, a category of offense that that civil, not legal. This class challenges us to think critically about how we define crime and how we should, perhaps, define crime instead.

    Course highlights:

    In the beginning of this course, the definition of crime is covered, as well as the various official and unofficial measures of crime that criminologists use to study it. This course covers the different theories of crime, which vary from theories of how criminals are "made" to how we should deal with crime. Additionally, it covers different types of crime, such as interpersonal violent crime and white collar crime. This course has a reoccurring emphasis as well on how intersecting social identities correlate to one's likelihood of perpetrating a type of crime, being criminalized for a certain act, and being victimized by certain types of crime.

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    The most important part of this course is to take thorough notes in lecture. I would recommend taking notes for this course on a laptop, as PJ writes her notes on a blackboard, and sometimes her organization can be confusing, making it nice to be able to adjust the way you have structured your notes without erasing pencil or crossing out pen. Readings are helpful, but you will not need to know any of them in minute detail for the exams. However, they are usually interesting and informative, so I would recommend reading them whenever possible to get the most out of the course.

    • Winter 2016
    • Dr.PJMcGann
    • A Few Big Assignments Great Discussions

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