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SADW 111 African Diaspora & the World

  • School:
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  • Professor:
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    AlexPierre, AlmaJeanBillingslea, ArlethaD.Williams, JerryL.Wever, PiperHuguley-Riggins, SorayaMekerta, Dr Beatriz Morales Fa, Shaconna Haley, Alicia Fontnette, DaliladeSousaSheppard, Jayme Canty, Dr. Busdiecker, Chatee Richardson, PushpaN.Parekh, Carolyn Hall, Anne Carlson, Pushpa Parekh
  • Average Course Rating (from 25 Students)

    4.6/5
    Overall Rating Breakdown
    • 25 Advice
    • 5
      72%
    • 4
      20%
    • 3
      8%
    • 2
      0%
    • 1
      0%
  • Course Difficulty Rating

    • Easy 4%

    • Medium 72%

    • Hard 24%

  • Top Course Tags

    Always Do the Reading

    Great Discussions

    A Few Big Assignments

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    • Profile picture
    Aug 15, 2017
    | No strong feelings either way.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    African Diaspora and the world was a new take on social interactions and changes in Africa. The school itself being an HBCU was powered by the strong presence of African culture. I was neither opposed nor impressed by this course due to the nature of delivery. The course would have been more innovating if there was a surplus of media and interactive education. In addition, to attend Spelman College, students were required to take the course every semester. I was somewhat disappointed to learn the credits did not transfer to any other school I applied to.

    Course highlights:

    I did enjoy much of the comparison to the diaspora of Africa to our nations civil war. It is quite interesting to learn how many similarities there are to cultures around the world. It is the perfect demonstration that we are all of the human race regardless of background.

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    Have an open mind about the diaspora of Africa. Even if a student finds no interest in the topics being discussed, there are many similarities to the history of the United States. Keeping an open mind and asking lots of questions will help a student become a successful African Diaspora scholar.

    • Fall 2009
    • Pushpa Parekh
    • Yes
    • Background Knowledge Expected Many Small Assignments Participation Counts
    • Profile picture
    Aug 01, 2017
    | Would recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    African Diaspora and the World is a course that focuses on the elaborate history of the African Diaspora.

    Course highlights:

    The highlights of this course were definitely the museum audio narrative projects because I learned how to gather a lot of information in one fell swoop. I also learned that everyone has a different perception on pieces of artwork.

    Hours per week:

    9-11 hours

    Advice for students:

    Although this course is mandatory and can seem like a lot of work, I would recommend freshmen students to take the work seriously and complete readings and reading assignments ahead of time so they don't fall behind in the course, which heavily revolves around music.

    • Fall 2016
    • Anne Carlson
    • Yes
    • Go to Office Hours Lots of Writing A Few Big Assignments
    • Profile picture
    Jul 15, 2017
    | Would highly recommend.

    This class was tough.

    Course Overview:

    This class challenged and expanded my perceptions of the African Diaspora, as well as pushed me to become a more avid reader and critical thinker. I would recommend this class to absolutely everyone, especially those interested in African studies or the African Diaspora. Even beyond those two subjects, this class changed the way I viewed the world around me; it influenced me to become a more conscious and aware global citizen. I now actually desire to understand the political, social, racial, and economic climate of the world, and even further, I desire to discuss it with others. This class gave me the confidence to initiate those types of discussions, which I never would have done before.

    Course highlights:

    I learned TONS about African history, the origins of African-American culture, the numerous movements within the black scholar community, black liberation movements worldwide, intersectionality, black feminist criticism, and much, much more. Along with those concepts, this class touched on world history, pedagogy, class structure, stereotypes, psychology, political science, etc. One of the characteristics of this class that I absolutely loved the most was its interdisciplinary nature. There's something for everyone! From discussing the scientific debates on the biological validity of race, to considering the lasting effects of colonialism in African nations, ADW has a stunningly expansive reach in terms of its material. The entire semester was an academic highlight.

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    Read the texts! ADW is not one of those classes that you can breeze your way through. You HAVE to do the readings in order to succeed. You will gain so much from this class, but it will only be gained by putting in the hours needed to understand the material (it can get very complex!). I would absolutely recommend group study sessions as well; during class discussions, material can be touched on very quickly, so it will be a huge benefit to meet up with your fellow classmates to continue discussions and exchange notes. Most of the material I remember came from those out-of-class meet ups! Also, go to office hours! It never hurts to show that extra initiative so your professors understands that you're serious about the class. They can also help you with any material that might confuse you!

    • Fall 2016
    • Carolyn Hall
    • Yes
    • Great Intro to the Subject Lots of Writing Requires Lots of Research

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