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PHIL 1034 Philosophy and the Just Society

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    • Profile picture
    Feb 13, 2017
    | Would highly recommend.

    Not too easy. Not too difficult.

    Course Overview:

    This course is fantastic. Going into this class for the first week was an absolutely unique experience that took a little getting used to. The class aims not to answer questions like "why are we just" or "what causes us to demand justice," but rather dig a little deeper into what exactly is defined as just throughout time. There are so many different philosophers that you learn about and each of their viewpoints are unique and extremely intriguing. You'll begin to ask yourself questions about our society that you never thought you could critically think of until Dr. Fumerton opens your eyes to such curiosities. The class strengthens your voice of reason, deliberation, and encourages you to ask questions outside the norm. It is an experience unlike any other, and specifically in philosophy (which some consider to be dull and unnecessary), keeps you intrigued until the very end. Take this class.

    Course highlights:

    As I have previously stated, this course encourages you to ask questions outside the norms society. It doesn't just explain justice, but explains the origins of the deliberation of what is considered just and unjust. The answers given to you by the ancient Greek philosophers will blow your mind. The readings (and I don't necessarily prefer reading) are interesting enough to keep you on the pages, and even to write notes to yourself on different points that you are bound to find intriguing. The discussion section is a whole other story, and all of the TA's are fantastic, but my TA was one of a kind. Jared Liebergen cares so much about his students, answers any questions that they have, and asks for participation, but only promises that in return you will get so much more out of the class, and I could not agree more with him.

    Hours per week:

    6-8 hours

    Advice for students:

    All you need to do is go in with an open mind. I understand that under Philosophy, as a course of study, this class can give the first impressions of being bland, but it just isn't. An open mind makes it so much easier to comprehend the insane questions that are proposed throughout the semester. Your curiosities will be peaked and you will appreciate the class that much more. Asking questions that you cannot get answers to elsewhere on campus, proposing and discussing unbelievably intriguing topics of discussion, and working with a professor and TA's that want nothing but for students to get the most out of this course is everything a student could ask for, and everything you can get in this class if you just come in with an open mind.

    • Fall 2016
    • RichardFumerton
    • Yes
    • Great Intro to the Subject Great Discussions Final Paper

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