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Chemical Principles 8th Edition

Chemical Principles (8th Edition)

Book Edition8th Edition
Author(s)DeCoste, Zumdahl
ISBN9781305581982
PublisherCengage Learning
SubjectChemistry
Section 5.3: The Ideal Gas Law
Critical Thinking
Section 5.4: Gas Stoichiometry
Critical Thinking
Section 5.6: The Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases
Critical Thinking
Section 5.11: Characteristics of Several Real Gases
Critical Thinking
End of Chapter
Marathon Problem
Chapter 5, Section 5.3, Critical Thinking, Exercise 01
Page 133

According to Charles's law, the volume of a gas is directly related to its temperature in Kelvin at constant pressure and number of moles. What if the volume of a gas was directly related to its temperature in Celsius at constant pressure and number of moles? What differences would you notice?


Explanation

 

References.

 

 

Rockley, M. G., & Rockley, N. L. (1995). A Charles' law experiment for beginning students. Journal of chemical education, 72(2), 179.

Answer

If the pressure remains constant, Charles' law states that the volume occupied by a fixed amount of gas is directly proportional to its absolute temperature. This empirical relationship was first proposed in 1787 by the French physicist J.-A.-C. Charles, and was later confirmed by the chemist Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac. It is a subset of the general gas law that can be deduced from the kinetic theory of gases under the assumption of an ideal (perfect) gas. At sufficiently low pressure and high temperature, measurements show that the thermal expansion of real gases follows Charles' law closely at constant pressure. if the volume of a gas was directly related to its temperature in Celsius at constant pressure and number of moles, the volume of a gas is directly proportional to the number of moles of gas at constant temperature and pressure. The pressure of a gas is directly proportional to the number of moles of gas at constant temperature and volume. According to Avogadro's law, the volume of a gas increases as the number of moles increases.

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