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Building Management Skills: An Action-First Approach 1st Edition

Building Management Skills: An Action-First Approach (1st Edition)

Book Edition1st Edition
Author(s)Daft, Marcic
ISBN9780324235999
PublisherCengage Learning
SubjectManagement
MANAGER CHALLENGE
Initial Thoughts
DISCOVER YOURSELF
DISCOVER KNOWLEDGE
What's Your Problem?
ACTION LEARNING
DELIBERATE PRATICE EXERCISES
IN-CLASS TEAM EXERCISE
FILELD TEAM EXERCISE
TEST YOUR METTLE
ROLE PLAY SIMULATIONS
PERSONAL SKILLS LOG
IN TEXT QUESTION
Chapter 3, MANAGER CHALLENGE, Initial Thoughts, Exercise 1
Page 117

Caffeine and Crullers sales manager Jason Wong is ready to explode. He just can't take another meeting where everyone goes on and on and on and nothing gets done. The other managers seem to enjoy talking every single tiny issue to death, looking at every angle and then re-examining each one again and again. Why do they avoid taking action? It's no wonder sales aren't increasing as much as the projections. If only director of operations Carrie Fishman and CFO Carlos Hernandez would agree to move forward on anything, it would be a huge improvement. And general manager Jane Sutton seems to enjoy listening to all this verbal rattling. Jason has talked to her three times about this already, but she never does anything about it. He's about to go in to a meeting with her to complain—again.

 

If you were Jason's boss, Jane Sutton, how would you plan to handle Jason's complaint?

Explanation

A general manager (GM) is responsible for all or part of the company's operations, including generating revenue and controlling costs.

 

Handling Complaints and Grievances

Employee complaints are inevitable even in the most work-friendly companies. Some complaints are quickly and easily resolved, while others take more time, energy, and patience.

 

Responding to complaints

As a general manager or top management, you should never assume that a complaint is groundless. If someone took the time to point out a problem, assume that at least one concern needs addressing.

 

  • Listen to the grievances of the complainant. Asking for the specific issue is a good start.
  • Ask other employees about their perception of the issue and look for the root of the problem. 
  • Keep them updated. Let the employee know the status of their complaint. If you agree there is a problem, specify what you intend to do about it. If you decide not to act on their complaint, explain why.
  • Set actions on the problem. Schedule a date or a meeting to check and see if the complainant is satisfied with the results.

 

 

Hello Dear Student,

 

I have provided some explanations to my answers and the best strategy that I can provide based on my experience.

 

If you need further information, please ask me.

 

Thanks,

 

Tutor Melanie

Answer

Suppose I were Jason's boss, Jane Sutton. I would plan to meet Jason on a one-on-one meeting and lay down answers to his complaints. As a general manager, I'm responsible for reprimanding managers with the best actions and suggestions for a better sales strategy. 

 

First, I'll listen to his complaints and assure him that he's never been neglected or out of the page. I'll explain to Jason that there are necessary factors why things didn't happen as he was thinking. Considering Jason's opinion, I would commend him for showing concern and urgency to the current situation. First, the sales matrix should be re-evaluated and revised if needed. Then, I'll give him my action plan and would encourage him to help as well. In a matter of days, I'll try to provide him with updates.

 

I think this is the best action to keep subordinates well-motivated by hearing them out completely.

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