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Building Management Skills: An Action-First Approach 1st Edition

Building Management Skills: An Action-First Approach (1st Edition)

Book Edition1st Edition
Author(s)Daft, Marcic
ISBN9780324235999
PublisherCengage Learning
SubjectManagement
MANAGER CHALLENGE
Initial Thoughts
DISCOVER YOURSELF
DISCOVER KNOWLEDGE
What's Your Problem?
ACTION LEARNING
DELIBERATE PRATICE EXERCISES
IN-CLASS TEAM EXERCISE
FILELD TEAM EXERCISE
TEST YOUR METTLE
ROLE PLAY SIMULATIONS
PERSONAL SKILLS LOG
IN TEXT QUESTION
Chapter 11, MANAGER CHALLENGE, Initial Thoughts, Exercise 1
Page 401

Jane Sutton, general manager of Caffeine and Crullers in Madison, Wisconsin, was called to a meeting with her boss, Edmund Daniels, COO in the Milwaukee corporate headquarters. Jane arrived a few minutes early for the 3:00 p.m. appointment and waited in the reception area thinking about her strategy for the meeting. Jane knows Edmund is an "idea person," always dreaming up new ways to do things. The purpose of this meeting is to discuss the draft of his newest idea, this one for restructuring the Madison locations, which would involve reassignment of responsibilities based more on a matrix structure than the current functional design. With only twelve locations in Madison, Jane believes the burden of a matrix structure will compromise productivity. Edmund feels passionately for his new ideas, but he never works out the details. It falls on Jane and her employees to work out execution details, usually wasting lots of time and resources. Edmund never seems to notice that most of his ideas fail, because he's off on a new one by that time. Jane has decided to be more forceful with Edmund this time. She agrees that a review of C&C's structure might be a good thing, but she wants to stop the possible implementation of a matrix structure. Jane is thinking about how she can confront Edmund in a way that prevents him from getting defensive and losing respect for her.

 

Initial thoughts

 

If you were Jane, what would you do?

Explanation

Some of the solution to Jane's dilemma can be;

I.                    Asking questions- bosses usually have more experience and knowledge than their juniors and before correcting the boss, Jane has to ask questions to make sure that her interpretation is right. Jane should engage Edmund in a conversation so she can get a clear picture of his idea before trying to correct him in any way (Patterson, 2012). This offers an opportunity for Jane to also learn about Edmund's ideas and get feedback.

 

II.                 Solutions offering- Jane has a responsibility and duty to offer her opinions to Edmund. Jane has an opinion about his ideas and she should try to air them out. Failure of Edmund's ideas is not his failure but is considered as an organizational failure and therefore Jane can strive to offer solutions that remedy the organization's brand image and reputation (Useem,2001).

 

III.              Focusing on a common ground- Jane and Edmund are working for the same organization with the sole purpose of succeeding therefore, when addressing the issue at hand, Jane should remind Edmund of the organizations' objectives and goals (Ury, 1993). Having a common ground ensures that decisions being made are based on facts and are helpful to the organization.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

1.      Patterson, K., Grenny, J., McMillan, R., & Switzler, A. (2012). Crucial conversations tools for talking when stakes are high. McGraw-Hill Education.

2.      Ury, W. (1993). Getting past no: Negotiating your way from confrontation to cooperation. Bantam.

3.      Useem, M. (2001). Leading up: How to lead your boss so you both win. Currency.

Answer

Correcting your boss might be an uphill task that might result in a negative confrontation where people might say things based on emotions and not carefully thought. Jane has been caught in a situation where she has to correct her boss' ideas but she fears that it will result in him being defensive or possibly losing respect for her. Jane therefore has to come up with ways in which she can engage with her boss without any conflicts. 

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