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Developing Helping Skills: A Step-by-Step Approach to Competency 3rd Edition

Developing Helping Skills: A Step-by-Step Approach to Competency (3rd Edition)

Book Edition3rd Edition
Author(s)Chang, Decker, Scott
ISBN9781305943261
PublisherCengage
SubjectPsychology
USING QUESTIONS TO GAIN DEEPER UNDERSTANDING
COMMON MISTAKES WHEN USING QUESTIONS
HOMEWORK EXERCISE
GENUINENESS
HOMEWORK EXERCISE
Chapter 9, USING QUESTIONS TO EXPLORE FURTHER, HOMEWORK EXERCISE , Exercise 01
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OPEN-ENDED QUESTIONS

 

Write three open-ended questions that you might use if your client is:

  • An adult

Explanation

1. What brings you here today?

  • For clients who need encouragement in opening up, it may be helpful to remark on their bravery in seeking therapy.For those who are at the other extreme and go into a lengthy and detailed explanation of their issues, perhaps having been in therapy before, it is best to listen empathically first before complimenting them on how well they appear to know themselves, and how they have thought a lot about what they would like to talk about in therapy.

 

2. Have you ever seen a counselor before?

  • For those who are in therapy for the first time, observing how comfortable and confident they are in talking about the challenges in their life can help set the stage for further disclosure.It may be helpful to set some expectation of what is going to happen in the therapeutic process by explaining how asking questions is at the core of the process and reassuring the client that they should feel free to interrupt at any time and to steer the conversation to where they need it to go.
  • If the client has seen a counselor before, it can prove very valuable to inquire further about their previous experience in therapy by asking about frequency, duration, and issues discussed during their previous engagements, as well as, what is one thing they remember most that a former counselor has told them.
  • An important aspect for engaging clients' engagement in the process of therapy is asking them about what went right, or what didn't turn out the way they would have liked in their previous therapeutic engagement, as this can point to where they place the sense of responsibility for their situation.
  • Inquiring if the client achieved the results they sought, and if they have been successful in maintaining them outside of the therapeutic relationship can also provide valuable insight into their motivation for change.

 

3. What do you expect from the counseling process?

  • Establishing a mutual agreement and setting expectations for the engagement is crucial to making progress. Clients' goals and preferences for the form and the level of interaction need to be taken into consideration.
  • Some clients like to vent and have the counselor listen; others want a high level of interaction and a form of spirited back and forth. It is also important to inquire how the client learns best and if they like to receive homework.

Additional open-ended questions:

  1. How many meetings do you think it will take to achieve your goals?
  2. How might you undermine achieving your own goals?
  3. How do you feel about using good advice to grow from?
  4. How will we know when we have been successful in achieving your goals for therapy?

 

(https://positivepsychology.com/therapy-questions/)

 

 

Answer

1. What brings you here today?

2. Have you ever seen a counselor before?

3. What do you expect from the counseling process?

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