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Can i get some help with formulas in solving this question..

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10. Look at Figure 27 below.
Blackbody Curves for Various Objects
Blackbody Curves near Solar Temperatures
7000 K
20
Relative Intensity
6000 K
5000 K
Log Relative Intensity
50000 K
(0-Star)
5783 K"
(Sun)
310 K
(Human)
Visible
Spectrum
2000
4000 6000
8000
10000
100A
1000A
1H
100 4 1 mm
Wavelength (Angstroms)
Wavelength (log scale)
Figure 27: Plots of blackbody curves.
A. Why do you suppose we humans have evolved to see light in the wavelength range that
we do (4,000-7,000 Angstroms)? Note: 1 Angstrom = 10-10 meters = 0.1 nanometer. If
the Sun were hotter, would it be useful for us to see at longer or shorter wavelengths?
B. Why can we not see each other "glowing in the dark"?
11. Now switching to telescopes, we will work with the most basic telescope, the human eye.
Draw two dots on a piece of white paper which will be help by a teammate. Slowly back
away from the sheet until the two dots appear as one.
A. Record the dot separation.
B. Record this distance for each member of the team.
C. For each distance, calculate the angular size between the two dots just as they appear
to be the same dot. Use the equation for angular size (x) in arcseconds: =
206,2650
arcseconds X d , where S is the separation of the dots and d is the distance between
radian
the observers eye and the dots. Show work.
D. What is the average angular size of the separation of the dots? Show work.
12. Repeat question 11, with two new dots a different separation away.
A. Record the dot separation.
B. Record this distance for each member of the team.
C. For each distance, calculate the angular size between the two dots just as they appear
to be the same dot. Use the equation for angular size (x) in arcseconds: =
206,265arcseconds * d , where S is the separation of the dots and d is the distance between
radian
the observers eye and the dots. Show work.
D. What is the average angular size of the separation of the dots now? Show work.
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AF7FD5BE-D3BB-43CD-9659-BBB67C0142C9.jpeg

9. Look at Figures 26 below.
Spectra of Various Elements
Calcium
Helium
Hydrogen
Lithium
Sodium
700
750
450
500
550
Krypton
Argon
Oxygen
Nitrogen
Barium
Spectrum of Unknown Composition
Figure 26: Spectra of Various Elements
A. How do you think the ability to identify a gas in this way is useful in astronomy? What
other fields might find it useful?
B. Figure 26 is real data. Can you tell what elements are present in the object that
produced the "Spectrum of Unknown Composition" (the lowest spectral set in the
figure)? Do not try to make a list of the elements that make up the composite spectra.
What are some difficulties Astronomers could have analyzing data?
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E1411329-7E33-47A6-89EC-AC639BAD2141.jpeg

Lab 5: Light and Telescope Lab
Purpose:
To explore spectra and their usefulness to astronomy. As well as the tool the telescope.
Procedure:
1. Visible Spectrum
A. Color the visible spectrum in the proper order of color and wavelength In Figure 13 at
the end of Lab 5. Remember, cite your source in text and in the reference page.
2. With your naked eye observe: hydrogen (H), helium (He), argon (Ar), neon (Ne), mercury,
(Hg), krypton (Kr), and xenon (Xe).
A. Record the visible color of each in Table 8 at the end of Lab 5.
3. Now using a spectroscope, please observe the provided elements again.
A. Draw the spectrum that you see with colored pencils in Figures 14 through 20 at the end
of Lab 5. Be aware of order and keep the side with the longer wavelength consistent.
B. What type of spectra are these? emission spectra
C. Judging from the number of visible energy-level transitions (lines) in the spectra, which
of the above elements would you conclude has the most complex atomic structure?
D. Judging from the number of visible energy-level transitions (lines) in the spectra, Which
element has the least complexity?
Argon
4. Observe diatomic oxygen (Oz) with your naked eye.
A. Record the visible color.
B. Then observe it using a spectroscope. Draw the spectrum that you see with colored
pencils in Figure 21 at the end of Lab 5. Be aware of order and keep the side with the
longer wavelength consistent.
C. What type of spectra is this?
5. Observe the mystery spectrum with your naked eye.
Right
A. Record the visible color.
B. Then observe it using a spectroscope. Draw the spectrum that you see with colored
pencils in Figure 22 at the end of Lab 5. Be aware of order and keep the side with the
longer wavelength consistent.
C. Identify the composition of the gas in the tube by comparing your spectrum with the
spectra you drew earlier. It is either hydrogen (H), mercury (Hg), or krypton (Kr).
6. Observe an incandescent light bulb with your naked eye,
A. Record the visible color.
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B. Then observe it using a spectroscope. Draw the spectrum that you see with colored
pencils in Figure 23 at the end of Lab 5. Be aware of order and keep the side with the
longer wavelength consistent.
C. Why type of spectra is this?
D. What color in the spectrum looks brightest? How does this color compare with the
overall color of the lamp to your naked eye?
7. Observe a CFL bulb with your naked eye,
A. Record the visible color.
B. Then observe it using a spectroscope. Draw the spectrum that you see with colored
pencils in Figure 24 at the end of Lab 5. Be aware of order and keep the side with the
longer wavelength consistent.
#7 8. Look at Figures 25 below.
A
n
Composite Spectrum
Figure 25: Spectra and the Composite Spectrum
A. What "elements" (A-G) are present in the object that produced the "Composite
Spectrum" (the lowest spectral set in Figure 25)?
B. Describe the method you used to answer part A.
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