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A consideration of the muscles of a tree frog make its jumping ability appear all the more impressive.

A consideration of the muscles of a tree frog make its jumping ability appear all the more impressive. Only 15% of the body mass of the cuban tree frog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) is comprised of jumping muscles. This compares to 25% in the leopard frog (Rana pipiens), a species that can only jump half as far, but weighs twice as much. If we assume equal contact time, how does the jump power-per-unit-mass of the jumping muscles compare between these two species? Does this help explain the high performance of the tree frog? Hint: Use the power equation listed on the equation list, which was not presented in lecture.

P = LMg/2mt

P: power/unit muscle mass, M: body mass, m: muscle mass, t: contact time L: jump distance, g: accel. of gravity

Answer: The power-per-unit mass of the tree frog is 3.33 times greater than the leopard frog. This does help explain how the tree frog jumps further.

In order to gain full credit, you need to show your work, including a listing of (1) the governing equations, (2) all parameters and variables, (3) all necessary assumptions, (4) the steps to finding the solution, with a descriptive sentence.

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