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Book 5 Life Cut-off date: Remember to show your working in all calculations. Information about how to submit your TMA is given in the Assessment...

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S104 Exploring Science Tutor-marked assignment 05 February 2010 presentation Covering: Book 5 Life Cut-off date: Thursday 15 July 2010 Introduction This tutor-marked assignment (TMA) will contribute 12% towards your final course score. Remember to show your working in all calculations. Information about how to submit your TMA is given in the Assessment Handbook (which you can access via StudentHome) and also on the Assessment page of the course website. You will receive feedback from your tutor on how well you have demonstrated the learning outcomes listed for each question. Question 1 We suggest you tackle this question after you have studied Chapters 1–3 of Book 5. This question carries 12% of the marks for this assignment. It will be marked according to how well you demonstrate in your answer the following learning outcomes: Ky4 use information technology to learn and communicate, in particular: access resources via the internet and contribute to electronic group discussions C2 apply knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts to address familiar and unfamiliar problems and their contribution to informed debate about topical issues In Book 5, Activity 3.1 your tutor group collaborated to research several different primate families. Using the information gathered by your tutor group , decide which of the primate species investigated you would prioritise for conservation action and explain why. ( We expect you will be able to do this in 300–400 words ) You will need to consider in your answer the combination of the three factors researched in the tutor group forum, namely the phylogenetic importance of the primate group, its geographical range and the current threats it faces within that range. In Book 4, Activity 17.1 you accessed a journal article via the Open University Library and were shown how to briefly cite the source of journal references in the text and then give the full details in a list of references at the end. For your answer to this TMA question it is important that you reference the sources of any information you use to help you come to your decision about conservation action. You should therefore use the following guidelines to help you reference any web documents or organisational websites that you accessed to help you answer this Copyright © 2010 The Open University WEB 01314 2 5.1
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question. Your reference should be explicit enough to allow your tutor to find the same website and check your information. Referencing web documents You should use the following format when referencing documents from the web. Author’s surname and initials, year of publication (in brackets), title of document, ‘available from’ information such as the web address, and the date you accessed the site. For example: Spitzer, K.L., Eisenberg, M.B. and Lowe, C.A. (1998) Information literacy: essential skills for the information age [online], Syracuse, NY: ERIC Clearinghouse on Information and Technology, Syracuse University (ED 427 780), available from: http://ericit.org/toc/infoliteracytoc.shtml (Accessed 28 October 2003). The text citation should be given as: (Spitzer et al., 1998) or Spitzer et al. (1998) state … Another example (which references an organisational website rather than a specific author) is: Open University Library (January 2005). Welcome to the Open University Library, available from: http://library.open.ac.uk/ (Accessed 2 February 2006). The text citation should be given as: (Open University Library, 2005) or Open University Library (2005) states … Question 2 We suggest you tackle this question after you have studied Chapters 5 and 6 of Book 5. This question carries 20% of the marks for this assignment. It will be marked according to how well you demonstrate in your answer the following learning outcomes: Kn1 knowledge and understanding of the importance of metabolic processes in the cell/organism C1 describe, analyse and interpret scientific information and data C2 apply knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts to address familiar and unfamiliar problems The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for centuries in the production of bread, beer and wine. In the absence of oxygen, yeast is able to derive energy from nutrient carbohydrates by switching from aerobic to anaerobic respiration. In the first step of anaerobic respiration, glycolysis, simple sugars such as glucose are oxidised to form pyruvate, with the net release of energy in the form of ATP (you may find it useful to refer to Figure 6.13, Book 5, p. 122): Step 1 Glycolysis glucose + ADP + NAD pyruvate + NAD.2H + ATP 2
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