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Is this hypothesis below relevant to this experiment?

Is this hypothesis below relevant to this experiment? The purpose of the experiment was to investigate the reactions between various ionic salt compounds in aqueous solutions, and if they produced a precipitate.


If a salt solution easily oxidizes, and reacts with another salt solution, then there is a high chance that it will produce a precipitate. This is because the high oxidizing salts happily give away their electrons and as a consequence, it becomes insoluble.

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The solution is... View the full answer

10 comments
  • Should you need additional explanation kindly state. Thank you.
    • mercenary
    • Apr 04, 2018 at 3:49am
  • Thank you for the answer, very helpful! What would be a more appropriate hypothesis?
    • Axel700
    • Apr 04, 2018 at 4:12am
  • A hypothesis is always a "SCIENTIFIC GUESS'' therefore you have to include what you think will happen and why you think that is so.
    • mercenary
    • Apr 04, 2018 at 4:46am
  • i.e TO DETERMINE IF THE SOLUBILITY RULES CAN HELP US IDENTIFY PRECIPITATES FORMED.
    • mercenary
    • Apr 04, 2018 at 5:00am
  • Thanks again for answering! How would you phrase the hypothesis in terms of solubility rules and as if you havn't executed the experiment yet?
    • Axel700
    • Apr 04, 2018 at 5:25am
  • Kindly come up again, am not getting you, Thank you. I will help you out on that.
    • mercenary
    • Apr 04, 2018 at 5:27am
  • A hypothesi is always a scientific guess, so i is always stated before starting an exoperiment, NB: A HYPOTHESIS DOESNT HAVE TO BE TRUE.
    • mercenary
    • Apr 04, 2018 at 5:32am
  • Your hypothesis will ONLY be considered VALID or INVALID after the experiment.
    • mercenary
    • Apr 04, 2018 at 5:34am
  • i.e You can have your hypothesis as : ALL NITRATES ARE INSOLUBLE . Only to find out at the end of the experiment that all nitrates are soluble, No penalty is administred for that hypothesis ONLY that you have to specify that the hypothesis was wrong in the discussion or Conclusion section. Thank you.
    • mercenary
    • Apr 04, 2018 at 5:36am
  • Yeah, but we did four different kinds of reactions, where three of them formed a precipitation. Therefore, I need to write a more general hypothesis. No matter if it's wrong or right, it should be applicable to all the reactions. But perhaps you can't do that, as you mentioned, you can only specify a hypothesis to one reaction.
    • Axel700
    • Apr 04, 2018 at 9:28am

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Other Answers

This hypothesis below is not relevant to this experiment. Reason: There is no relation... View the full answer

1 comment
  • How would you phrase the hypothesis in terms of solubility rules and as if you havn't executed the experiment yet?
    • Axel700
    • Apr 04, 2018 at 5:27am

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