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2. When the equilibrium reaction, in which bromophenol blue dissociates to form

its weak base and a H+ ion, goes forward, it turns the solution from yellow to blue. What did you observe when you added additional amounts of each of the following: hydrochloric acid (HCl) and potassium hydroxide (KOH, a base)? What does the color of the mixture indicate about the concentration of products or reactants in the mixture? Based on these observations, what general statement can you make about adding more products or reactants to an equilibrium reaction? (5 points)


3. In part B, you varied the amount of products and reactants. The reaction quotient (Q) is defined as the ratio of the amount of products (P) to the amount of reactants (R) in a system at any given moment (that is, Q = P/R). In equilibrium, this reaction quotient is equal to an equilibrium constant (Keq), which is fixed for a given reaction and temperature. If equilibrium is disturbed by adding more products or reactants, Q does not equal Keq and the system responds to restore equilibrium. When you add more reactants to the system, does Q become larger or smaller than Keq? How does the amount of products change to compensate? What would happen if more products were instead added to the system — would Q be larger or smaller than Keq, and what would happen to the amount of reactants to make Q = Keq? (5 points)

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