(This will be your main source for the paper.) This source can be one of the readings from Graff & Birkenstein, or it can be a source you find...
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Hello all, Can you help me with this assignment? Please see the attached file.

The first one is my teacher's requirement and the others are 5 sources as his requested.

Thank you!

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ARGUMENT PAPER ASSIGNMENT SHEET Find a source that is making an argument that you fnd interesTng. (±his will be your main source ²or the paper.) ±his source can be one o² the readings ²rom Gra³ & Birkenstein, or it can be a source you fnd on your own. Your paper will be a response to this source. Present the argument and make responses to the argument using ²urther research. In the end, show how your understanding o² the argument has changed. Do you agree with it more or less than you did when you frst read it? Do you disagree with it more or less than you did when you frst read it? (1) ±ell me which main source you are going to write about. ±his is either one o² the readings ²rom Gra³ & Birkenstein or another source (making an argument) that you have ²ound. Give me an author name and an arTcle name, as well as the name o² the periodical it appears in, i² it does. Requirements: ±here are no ²ormat requirements. Write in whole sentences. Grading Rubric Weights Sentence Quality (20%): Paper makes strong sentences! Paper meets standards o² grammar, mechanics, and ²ormality set ²orth in Writer’s Re²erence . Assignment/Format (80%): Paper meets assignment requirements ²or content. Paper meets source count. Grade will be part o² the acTviTes grade ²or the quarter. ARGUMENT DRAFT (due Monday, December 1). Write a paper with the ²ollowing outline: IntroducTon: One or two paragraphs that show the reader what is interesTng and important about the controversy the main source argument is involved in. You can describe the conversaTon that the main source is parTcipaTng in. At the end o² the introducTon, tell the reader what the overall claim that your paper will be making. Main source summary: One paragraph that summarizes the argument o² your main source. Responses: At least ²our paragraphs that respond to di³erent points in the main source argument. ±hese responses will be pa´erned on the Argument Response ±emplate Sheets. You can use any ±emplates ²rom the two sheets. You can use the same ±emplate mulTple Tmes, but do try to have some variety. Each o² these paragraphs will develop the response with in²ormaTon ²rom at least one addiTonal source. Conclusion:
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One or two paragraphs that show how your understanding of the main source’s argument has changed aFer your responses. You can consider the following quesTons: what do you want the reader to think aFer you’ve shown them your responses and your further sources? Is the main source argument stronger than it was before? Weaker? Is it more complicated? ±his secTon should refer back to the points made in the previous paragraphs, but not in a repeTTous way. Requirements: ²our pages. ²ive sources minimum (one main source and at least four addiTonal sources). QuotaTons allowed, but there should be more paraphrase than quotaTon. MLA format. Grading Rubric Weights Length: 30% Source Count: 40% Format: 20% Assignment: 10% Grade will be part of the acTviTes grade for the quarter. ARGUMENT PAPER (due Tuesday, December 8 – Final Exam Session). Revise the DraF per my notes & syllabus guidelines. Grading Rubric Weights ( see above for explanatons ): Sentence Quality (30%) Paragraph Construc±on (20%): Paragraphs have an ISSUE porTon and a DISCUSSION porTon: the paragraph thesis is in the ISSUE porTon, and evidence from the sources is in the DISCUSSION porTon. DISCUSSION porTon is longer than the ISSUE porTon. Paragraphs are well developed (DISCUSSION porTon is su³ciently large). Paragraphs ´ow coherently from sentence to sentence. Paragraphs begin with a transiTon phrase or sentence signaling the shiF in ISSUE from the previous paragraph. Sources (30%): Paper meets source count. Each body paragraph uses at least one source. ±here is more paraphrase than quotaTon. Format (10%): Page layout, in-text citaTons, and bibliography is in MLA format. Assignment (10%): Paper meets length requirements. Revision procedures per syllabus have been followed.
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A year ago, few folks were talking about Sheryl Sandberg. Her thoughts on feminism were of little  interest. More significantly, there was next-to-no public discussion of feminist thinking and practice.  Rarely, if ever, was there any feminist book mentioned as a bestseller and certainly not included on  the  New York Times  Best Seller list. Those of us who have devoted lifetimes to teaching and writing  theory, explaining to the world the ins and outs of feminist thinking and practice, have experienced  that the primary audience for our work is an academic sub-culture. In recent years, discussions of  feminism have not evoked animated passion in audiences. We were far more likely to hear that we  are living in a post-feminist society than to hear voices clamoring to learn more about feminism. This  seems to have changed with Sandberg’s book  Lean In, holding steady on the  Times  bestseller list for more than sixteen weeks. No one was more surprised than long-time advocates of feminist thinking and practice to learn via  mass media that a new high priestess of feminist movement was on the rise. Suddenly, as if by  magic, mass media brought into public consciousness conversations about feminism, reframing the  scope and politics through an amazing feat of advertising. At the center of this drama was a young,  high-level corporate executive, Sheryl Sandberg, who was dubbed by Oprah Winfrey and other  popular culture pundits as “the new voice of revolutionary feminism.”  Forbes Magazine  proclaimed  Sandberg to be one of the most influential women in the world, if not the most.  Time  Magazine  ranked her one of a hundred of the most powerful and influential world leaders. All over  mass media, her book  Lean In  has been lauded as a necessary new feminist manifesto. Yet Sandberg confesses to readers that she has not been a strong advocate of feminist movement;  that like many women of her generation, she hesitated when it came to aligning herself with feminist  concerns. She explains: I headed into college believing that the feminists of the sixties and seventies had done the hard work of achieving equality for my generations. And yet, if anyone had called me a feminist I would have quickly corrected that notion…. On one hand, I started a group to encourage more women to major in economics and government. On the other hand, I would have denied being in any way, shape, or form a feminist. None of my college friends thought of themselves as feminists either. It saddens me to admit that we did not see the backlash against women around us…. In our defense, my friends and I truly, if naively, believed that the world did not need feminists anymore. Although Sandberg revised her perspective on feminism, she did not turn towards primary sources  (the work of feminist theorists) to broaden her understanding. In her book, she offers a simplistic  description of the feminist movement based on women gaining equal rights with men. This  construction of simple categories (women and men) was long ago challenged by visionary feminist  thinkers, particularly individual black women/women of color. These thinkers insisted that everyone  acknowledge and understand the myriad ways race, class, sexuality, and many other aspects of  identity and difference made explicit that there was never and is no simple homogenous gendered  identity that we could call “women” struggling to be equal with men. In fact, the reality was and is that
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privileged white women often experience a greater sense of solidarity with men of their same class  than with poor white women or women of color. Sandberg’s definition of feminism begins and ends with the notion that it’s all about gender equality  within the existing social system. From this perspective, the structures of imperialist white  supremacist capitalist patriarchy need not be challenged. And she makes it seem that privileged  white men will eagerly choose to extend the benefits of corporate capitalism to white women who  have the courage to ‘lean in.’ It almost seems as if Sandberg sees women’s lack of perseverance as  more the problem than systemic inequality. Sandberg effectively uses her race and class power and  privilege to promote a narrow definition of feminism that obscures and undermines visionary feminist concerns. Contrast her definition of feminism with the one I offered more than twenty years ago in  Feminist  Theory From Margin To Center  and then again in  Feminism Is For Everybody .  Offering a broader  definition of feminism, one that does not conjure up a battle between the sexes (i.e. women against  men), I state: “Simply put, feminism is a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and  oppression.” No matter their standpoint, anyone who advocates feminist politics needs to understand the work does not end with the fight for equality of opportunity within the existing patriarchal  structure. We must understand that challenging and dismantling patriarchy is at the core of  contemporary feminist struggle – this is essential and necessary if women and men are to be truly  liberated from outmoded sexist thinking and actions. Ironically, Sandberg’s work would not have captured the attention of progressives, particularly men,  if she had not packaged the message of “lets go forward and work as equals within white male  corporate elites” in the wrapping paper of feminism. In the “one hundred most influential people in  the world” issue of  Time Magazine , the forty-three-year old Facebook COO was dubbed by the  doyen of women’s liberation movement Gloria Steinem in her short commentary with the heading  “feminism’s new boss.” That same magazine carried a full page ad for the book  Lean In: Women,  Work, and The Will to Lead  that carried the heading “Inspire the graduate in your Life” with a  graduating picture of two white females and one white male. The ad included this quote from  Sandberg’s commencement speech at Barnard College in 2011: “I hope that you have the ambition  to lean in to your career and run the world. Because the world needs you to change it.” One can only speculate whether running the world is a call to support and perpetuate first world imperialism. This  is precisely the type of feel good declaration Sandberg makes that in no way clarifies the embedded  agenda she supports. Certainly, her vision of individual women leaning in at the corporate table does not include any clear  statements of which group of women she is speaking to and about, and the “lean in” woman is never
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I am proud of my bona Fdes on supporting the advancement of women. It angers me to think how slow executive suites and boardrooms are to welcome more qualiFed females. Stubborn gender wage gaps for comparable work are unacceptable and must be closed. However, with all of the attention and focus on supporting equal opportunities for women, we have taken our eyes o± an alarming trend. Young men in the US are in trouble by any measure of educational attainment. It’s a big deal and, for reasons of political correctness, we aren’t talking enough about this growing national problem. I refuse to believe the support of young American’s progress is a zero-sum game — that somehow if we call attention to the problem and take a di±erent approach to improve the experience and outcomes of boys it would come at the expense of celebrating and enabling continued advancement of girls. We can and must recognize the unique challenges of young men and we had better start doing something about it now. Have you taken a stroll on a college campus recently? Where have the men gone? In the latest census , males comprise 51% of the total US population between the ages of 18-24. Yet, just over 40% of today’s college students are men. In fact, in each year since 1982, more American women than men have received bachelor’s degrees Over the last decade two million more women graduated from college than men. And the gap continues to grow. Michael Thompson, author of Raising Cain , a great book on the plight of young males, illustrates the path we are going down with a startling extrapolation. He notes that if today’s trends continue unaltered, the last young man in the US to get a college degree will do so in 2068. Scary stu±. The gender achievement gap is astounding. The average 11th grade boy writes at the level of the average 8th grade girl. Men are signiFcantly underperforming women. According to a recent NBC news report , women dominate high school honor rolls and now make up more than 70% of class valedictorians. Again, I am happy to see women succeeding. But can we really a±ord for our country’s young men to fall so far behind? A growing education attainment gap has profound consequences for the economy. It mattered far less during the industrial era when young men in this country could Fnd good high-wage jobs in the manufacturing sector without a college degree or post-secondary credential. In a post-industrial economy, the social contract has changed. The deal used to be that college was only for a narrow segment of our population. Everyone else willing to work hard could make enough money to raise a family and achieve the American dream of owning
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a home, without higher education. With the disappearance of those industrial era jobs, the rug got pulled out from under that assumption. We replaced it with a new social contract by which a college degree, or at least some form of post-secondary credential, was a necessity for anyone hoping to make a decent living. The numbers on this are clear. According to census data, annual earnings for high-school dropouts average $18,900; for high-school graduates, $25,900; for college graduates, $45,400. Add up those numbers over a lifetime and the importance of education comes into focus. And that’s if there is a job at all. Take a look at how hard the current recession has hit men. Of the jobs lost over the last four years 78% of them were held by men. That leaves 20% of working age men out of work. These jobs are not coming back and men are ill prepared for the 21st century workplace. If you dig deeper and examine these trends for young men of color it will make you cry. At the Business Innovation Factory , our team has been working with the College Board to explore the experience of young men of color in the U.S. The statistics are staggering. Only 26% of African American, 18% of Latino American, and 24% of Native American and Paci±c Islander young men ages 24-34 have attained at least an Associates Degree. BIF and the College Board are bringing the voice and experience of young men of color to the center of an innovation conversation on how to turn these disturbing trends around. You can watch a short video trailer about our ongoing work here . We think equal progress will only come when the US has transformed its education system from a one-size-±ts-all pipeline responding to the learning needs of all young men and women in the same way to an individualized approach where every student can ±nd his or her own pathway. We must go from a system geared toward enrollment to one designed around the goal of completion. In some way, we must turn schools into places that recognize the speci±c learning needs of young men and help them prepare for 21st century jobs — and we must do so urgently, or leave an entire generation foundering.
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What Would You Do If You Weren't Afraid? My grandmother Rosalind Einhorn was born exactly fifty-two years before I was, on August 28, 1917. Like many poor Jewish families in the boroughs of New York City, hers lived in a small, crowded apartment close to their relatives. Her parents, aunts, and uncles addressed her male cousins by their given names, but she and her sister were referred to only as "Girlie." During the Depression, my grandmother was pulled out of Morris High School to help support the household by sewing fabric flowers onto undergarments that her mother could resell for a tiny profit. No one in the community would have considered taking a boy out of school. A boy's education was the family's hope to move up the financial and social ladder. Education for girls, however, was less important both financially, since they were unlikely to contribute to the family's income, and culturally, since boys were expected to study the Torah while girls were expected to run a "proper home." Luckily for my grandmother, a local teacher insisted that her parents put her back into school. She went on not only to finish high school but to graduate from U.C. Berkeley. After college, "Girlie" worked selling pocketbooks and accessories at David's Fifth Avenue. When she left her job to marry my grandfather, family legend has it that David's had to hire four people to
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replace her. Years later, when my grandfather's paint business was struggling, she jumped in and took some of the hard steps he was reluctant to take, helping to save the family from financial ruin. She displayed her business acumen again in her forties. After being diagnosed with breast cancer, she beat it and then dedicated herself to raising money for the clinic that treated her by selling knockoff watches out of the trunk of her car. Girlie ended up with a profit margin that Apple would envy. I have never met anyone with more energy and determination than my grandmother. When Warren Buffett talks about competing against only half of the population, I think about her and wonder how different her life might have been if she had been born half a century later. When my grandmother had children of her own — my mother and her two brothers — she emphasized education for all of them. My mother attended the University of Pennsylvania, where classes were coed. When she graduated in 1965 with a degree in French literature, she surveyed a workforce that she believed consisted of two career options for women: teaching or nursing. She chose teaching. She began a Ph.D. program, got married, and then dropped out when she became pregnant with me. It was thought to be a sign of weakness if a husband needed his wife's help to support their family, so my mother became a stay-at-home parent and an active volunteer. The centuries-old division of labor stood.
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Lately, the raging debate about issues of "work-life  balance" has focused on whether or not women can "have it all." Entirely lost in this debate is the growing strain of  work-life balance on men, who today are feeling the  competing demands of work and home as much or more  than women. And the truth is as shocking as it is obvious:  No one can have it all The baby has a heartbeat. The ultrasound shows ten fuzzy Fngers and ten fuzzy toes and a tiny crescent-moon mouth that will soon let out the Frst of many wails. We have chosen not to Fnd out the gender, and when the question comes, as it does every day, we say we have no preference. Ten Fngers, ten toes. A wail in the delivery room would be nice. But in private, just us, we talk. About the pros and cons of boys versus girls, and about whether it would be better, more advantageous, to be born a boy or a girl right now. It's a toss-up, or maybe just a draw — impossible to say that a boy or a girl born in America in 2013 has any conspicuous advantages because of his or her gender. Consider the facts: Nearly 60 percent of the bachelor's degrees in this country today go to women. Same number for graduate degrees. There are about as many women in the workforce as men, and according to Hanna Rosin's 2012 book, The End of Men, of the Ffteen professions projected to grow the fastest over the coming years, twelve are currently dominated by women. Per a 2010 study by James Chung of Reach Advisors, unmarried childless women under thirty and with full-time jobs earn 8 percent more than their male peers in 147 out of 150 of the largest U. S. cities. The accomplishments that underlie those numbers are real and world-historic, and through the grueling work of generations of women, men and women are as equal as they have ever been. Adding to that the greater male predisposition to ADHD, alcoholism, and drug abuse, women have nothing but momentum coming out of young adulthood — the big mo! — and then. .. Well, what exactly? Why don't women hold more than 15 percent of Fortune 500 executive-o±cer positions in America? Why are they stalled below 20 percent of Congress? Why does the average woman earn only seventy-seven pennies for every dollar made by the average man? Childbirth plays a role, knocking
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ambitious women of their proFessional stride For months (iF not years) at a time while their male peers go chug-chug-chugging along, but then why do some women still make it to the top while others Fall by the wayside? Institutional sexism and pay discrimination are still ugly realities, but with the millions in annual penalties levied on ofending businesses (and the attendant PR shitstorms), they have become increasingly, and thankFully, uncommon. College majors count (women still dominate education, men engineering), as do career choices, yet none oF these on their own explains why the opportunity gap between the sexes has all but closed yet a stark achievement gap persists. ±or a Fuller explanation, the national conversation oF late has settled on a single issue — work-liFe balance — with two voices in particular dominating: The ²rst belongs to Former State Department policy chieF Anne-Marie Slaughter, whose essay "Why Women Still Can't Have It All" was the most widely read story ever on The Atlantic 's Web site and landed her a book deal and spots on Today and Colbert. Slaughter's twelve-thousand- word story relies on personal anecdotes mixed with wonk talk: "I still strongly believe that women can 'have it all' (and that men can too). I believe that we can 'have it all at the same time.' But not today, not with the way America's economy and society are currently structured." The scarcity oF Female leaders to efect public and corporate change on behalF oF women; the in³exibility oF the traditional workday; the prevalence oF what she calls " 'time macho' — a relentless competition to work harder, stay later, pull more all-nighters, travel around the world and bill the extra hours that the international date line afords you." All these Factors conspire to deprive women oF "it all." (The "it" in question being like Potter Stewart's de²nition oF pornography: You know it when you have it.) The second, and altogether more grown-up, voice belongs to ±acebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, whose "sort oF Feminist" maniFesto Lean In urges women to command a seat at any table oF their choosing. Like Slaughter, Sandberg reFerences the usual systemic challenges, but what it really boils down to, Sandberg argues, is what Aretha ±ranklin and Annie Lennox prescribed back in the eighties: Sisters Doin' It For Themselves. Sandberg encourages women to negotiate harder, be more assertive, and Forget about being liked and concentrate instead on letting 'er rip. She believes that women can, and should, determine the pace and scope oF their own careers, and For her audacity in assigning some agency to the women oF America, her critics
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84 JULY/AUGUST 2012 THE ATLANTIC
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THE ATLANTIC JULY/AUGUST 2012 85 Why Women Still Can’t Have It All it’s t±me to stop fooling ourselves, says a woman who left a position of power: the women who have managed to be both mothers and top professionals are superhuman, rich, or self- employed. If we truly believe in equal opportunity for all women, here’s what has to change. By anne-M²r±e ³l²ughter PHILLIP TOLEDANO
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usce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante


ipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec


amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultr


ia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, conse


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llentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Na


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