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Cause study. 1- Make befit for the topic. 2A analysis this events and show how this events impact the economic parts such as price , demand , supply

Cause study.
1- Make befit for the topic.
2- A analysis this events and show how this events impact the economic parts such as price , demand , supply …
3- Using the graphic diagram to illustrate the impact of this events .
Please explain as much as passable



Does the oil spill put seafood restaurants at risk?
By Stephanie Chen, CNN
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
May 5, 2010 10:03 a.m. EDT
Cause study. 1- Make befit for the topic. 2- A analysis this events and show how this events impact the economic parts such as price , demand , supply … 3- Using the graphic diagram to illustrate the impact of this events . Please explain as much as passable Does the oil spill put seafood restaurants at risk? By Stephanie Chen , CNN STORY HIGHLIGHTS May 5, 2010 10:03 a.m. EDT NOAA is restricting commercial and recreational fishing along the Gulf Coast Restaurant owners who depend on seafood are worried about the oil slick impacts About 40 percent of the U.S. seafood is harvested from the Gulf Coast Louisiana's economy and culture relies heavily on the availability of seafood (CNN) -- The "single best bite of food" in Louisiana, according to Tommy Cvitanovich, is the charbroiled oyster soaked in butter, garlic and cheese. Then the tough little mollusk is grilled to a smoky perfection. His two restaurants, both named Drago's, served 3 million of these delectable oysters last year. Cvitanovich continues to serve the popular oysters to his customers. But with the oil spill disaster looming toward the Gulf Coast waters abundant with seafood, he and other restaurant owners are bracing for the worst possibilities: a shortage of seafood, price hikes and a public misperception that Louisiana seafood is dangerous.
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"Everything in Louisiana is at risk right now," said the 51-year-old Cvitanovich. "Virtually every meal that comes from our kitchen is seafood. I am worried about the availability, the quality, the price." It's too early to determine what impact April's deadly BP oil rig explosion will have on the nation's seafood and the restaurant industry. So far, precautionary fishing closures means there are fewer places to harvest seafood. That could be troubling news to a domestic seafood industry that has been pummeled by cheaper imports in recent years. This week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration began restricting for 10 days commercial and recreational fishing along the Gulf Coast, an area that spans about 6,800 miles.Louisiana closed areas designated for special shrimping on Tuesday. As officials are scrambling to contain the mushrooming leak, some restaurant owners are fretting about what it would mean for their businesses if oysters, shrimp, crab and finfish were not as available. Depending on the season, about 40 percent of the nation's commercial seafood harvests come from the Gulf Coast, according to NOAA data from 2008. "The Gulf Coast is such an important biologic and economic area in term of seafood production and recreational fishing," said Roy Crabtree, NOAA Fisheries Southeast regional administrator. The National Restaurant Association, a group representing 380,000 restaurants across the country, has heard some complaints from restaurants in the New Orleans area. Restaurants in states far from the spill are even calling to stay updated on the availability of seafood, said Annika Stensson, a spokeswoman for the National Restaurant Association. She said it's premature to conclusively determine effects of the oil spill but predicts the accident will impact the "supply and price of seafood for restaurants nationwide that serve products from this area." "We are watching the situation for sure," she said. "We have heard some grumbling from some of our members in the Gulf Coast area." Concerns are mounting rapidly in Louisiana where seafood is the lifeblood of the economy and culinary culture. Seafood recipes there are like an art form, ingrained into family cookbooks, passed down from one generation to the next, locals proudly say. Fried oyster Po-Boys (breadcrumb-crusted oysters inside two slices of French bread) and barbeque shrimp (a Louisiana classic where shrimp is dripped in pepper, Worchester sauce and butter) are among many of the famous dishes. From the fisherman to the restaurant owners, they all depend on the availability of seafood from the Gulf. Louisiana's seafood industry reels in $2.4 billion dollars annually. Louisiana ranks behind only one state -- Alaska -- when it comes to total commercial seafood production. Louisiana remains the No. 1 producer of shrimp, blue crab meat, and oysters, said Ewell Smith, executive director of the Louisiana Seafood Promotion & Marketing Board. The potential damage from the oil slick threatens as the state is battling the recession. Even worse, the summer months are typically the peak shrimping season for fishermen. A majority -- about 70 percent -- of Louisiana's waters remain open for fishing, Smith said. For example, only six of the 32 oyster beds in Louisiana are prohibited from being harvested, but the rest are open to fisherman.
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