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Hello, I need help urgently for this 10 question AP English Language quiz.

Here are some questions I need help with:


Question 1

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


The following is taken from a passage written by the famed naturalist, John Muir.


(1) The immortal Linnaeus—Carl von Linné—was born in Sweden, a cold rocky country now famous forever. (2) He was born in the bloom-time of the year, May 13th, 1707; and in pondering the significance of his birth, one might stop to give thanks and reflect on the wonderful inspiration his life would come to serve.


(3) Whether descended from sea-kings and pirates as is most likely, or from fighting Normans or goths, matters not; for he was a lover sent of God to revive and cheer and bless all mankind. (4) And this he did in spite of crushing poverty, and all the black brood of disappointments and discouragements that ever beset the onway of genius. (5) His parents were as poor and pious as the parents of great men usually are. (6) He was a naturalist from his birth, and reveled in the bloom of the fields and gardens about his native village of Rashult as naturally as a bee. (7) By his steady, slow-going neighbors, he was looked on as one possessed.


(8) His father, a minister, naturally wished his son to follow in his footsteps, and so he pinched pennies and saved money to send young Carl to school with this end in view. (9) But the studies leading to the ministry did not interest the lad, and like other divine boys he was called a dunce. (10) Accordingly, when his father visited the school and anxiously inquired how Carl was getting on, he was bluntly told that the boy was dull, had no brains, and could never be made into a minister or scholar of any kind. (11) Under these dark circumstances, the best advice the schoolmaster was able to offer the discouraged father was to take away his boy and make a tailor or a shoemaker of him.


(12) Yet this was the boy who was to do the most of all for many generations to open men's eyes to see the beauty of God's gardens and the creatures that enliven them.


In sentence 11 (reproduced below), the writer wants to use a transitional phrase to create the appropriate tone for the information contained in the sentence.


Under these dark circumstances, the best advice the schoolmaster was able to offer the discouraged father was to take away his boy and make a tailor or a shoemaker of him.


Which version of the underlined text best achieves this goal? (3 points)


Despite this reality


On the brighter side


(as it is now)


In this situation


With this in mind



Question 2

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


The following is taken from a passage written by the famed naturalist, John Muir.


(1) The immortal Linnaeus—Carl von Linné—was born in Sweden, a cold rocky country now famous forever. (2) He was born in the bloom-time of the year, May 13th, 1707; and in pondering the significance of his birth, one might stop to give thanks and reflect on the wonderful inspiration his life would come to serve.


(3) Whether descended from sea-kings and pirates as is most likely, or from fighting Normans or goths, matters not; for he was a lover sent of God to revive and cheer and bless all mankind. (4) And this he did in spite of crushing poverty, and all the black brood of disappointments and discouragements that ever beset the onway of genius. (5) His parents were as poor and pious as the parents of great men usually are. (6) He was a naturalist from his birth, and reveled in the bloom of the fields and gardens about his native village of Rashult as naturally as a bee. (7) By his steady, slow-going neighbors, he was looked on as one possessed.


(8) His father, a minister, naturally wished his son to follow in his footsteps, and so he pinched pennies and saved money to send young Carl to school with this end in view. (9) But the studies leading to the ministry did not interest the lad, and like other divine boys he was called a dunce. (10) Accordingly, when his father visited the school and anxiously inquired how Carl was getting on, he was bluntly told that the boy was dull, had no brains, and could never be made into a minister or scholar of any kind. (11) Under these dark circumstances, the best advice the schoolmaster was able to offer the discouraged father was to take away his boy and make a tailor or a shoemaker of him.


(12) Yet this was the boy who was to do the most of all for many generations to open men's eyes to see the beauty of God's gardens and the creatures that enliven them.


In sentence 2 (reproduced below), the writer wants to include descriptive details that convey the intense admiration he has for Linnaeus.


He was born in the bloom-time of the year, May 13th, 1707; and in pondering the significance of his birth, one might stop to give thanks and reflect on the wonderful inspiration his life would come to serve.


Which of the following versions of the underlined text best achieves this purpose? (3 points)


(as it is now)


and contemplating this great event, one may easily fancy every living thing dancing and singing and clapping hands for joy.


and considering this event, one may give pause to consider the influence the man would someday have on nature and the world around him.


and in reflecting on this event, one might wonder how different the world might have been had the naturalist not been born at all.


and in thinking about the impact Linnaeus would someday have on nature and the world around him, one might be uplifted and inspired.


Question 3

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


The following is taken from a passage written by the famed naturalist, John Muir.


(1) The immortal Linnaeus—Carl von Linné—was born in Sweden, a cold rocky country now famous forever. (2) He was born in the bloom-time of the year, May 13th, 1707; and in pondering the significance of his birth, one might stop to give thanks and reflect on the wonderful inspiration his life would come to serve.


(3) Whether descended from sea-kings and pirates as is most likely, or from fighting Normans or goths, matters not; for he was a lover sent of God to revive and cheer and bless all mankind. (4) And this he did in spite of crushing poverty, and all the black brood of disappointments and discouragements that ever beset the onway of genius. (5) His parents were as poor and pious as the parents of great men usually are. (6) He was a naturalist from his birth, and reveled in the bloom of the fields and gardens about his native village of Rashult as naturally as a bee. (7) By his steady, slow-going neighbors, he was looked on as one possessed.


(8) His father, a minister, naturally wished his son to follow in his footsteps, and so he pinched pennies and saved money to send young Carl to school with this end in view. (9) But the studies leading to the ministry did not interest the lad, and like other divine boys he was called a dunce. (10) Accordingly, when his father visited the school and anxiously inquired how Carl was getting on, he was bluntly told that the boy was dull, had no brains, and could never be made into a minister or scholar of any kind. (11) Under these dark circumstances, the best advice the schoolmaster was able to offer the discouraged father was to take away his boy and make a tailor or a shoemaker of him.


(12) Yet this was the boy who was to do the most of all for many generations to open men's eyes to see the beauty of God's gardens and the creatures that enliven them.


The writer wants to include additional information after sentence 7 (reproduced below) to elaborate on his neighbors' perceptions to show how unique Linnaeus was. Which of the following sentences best accomplishes this goal?


By his steady, slow-going neighbors, he was looked on as one possessed. (3 points)


His town was sparsely populated; among his neighbors he had few friends.


His deep love of nature occupied much of his time and gave him great joy.


They did not know what to make of him; neither did his own father and mother.


His family was rather poor, and most of his neighbors equally so.


They also enjoyed a great love of nature but not as much as Linnaeus.


Question 4

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


The following excerpt is from a news conference given by President Kennedy in 1962.


(1) Simultaneous and identical actions of United States Steel and other leading steel corporations, increasing steel prices by some six dollars a ton, constitute a wholly unjustifiable and irresponsible defiance of the public interest.


(2) In this serious hour in our nation's history, when we are confronted with grave crises in Berlin and Southeast Asia, when we are devoting our energies to economic recovery and stability, when we are asking Reservists to leave their homes and families for months on end, and servicemen to risk their lives -- and four were killed in the last two days in Viet Nam -- and asking union members to hold down their wage requests, at a time when restraint and sacrifice are being asked of every citizen, the American people will find it hard, as I do, to accept a situation in which a tiny handful of steel executives whose pursuit of private power and profit exceeds their sense of public responsibility can show such utter contempt for the interests of 185 million Americans.


(3) If this rise in the cost of steel is imitated by the rest of the industry, instead of rescinded, it would increase the cost of homes, autos, appliances, and most other items for every American family. It would increase the cost of machinery and tools to every American businessman and farmer. It would seriously handicap our efforts to prevent an inflationary spiral from eating up the pensions of our older citizens, and our new gains in purchasing power.


(4) It would add, Secretary McNamara informed me this morning, an estimated one billion dollars to the cost of our defenses, at a time when every dollar is needed for national security and other purposes. It would make it more difficult for American goods to compete in foreign markets, more difficult to withstand competition from foreign imports, and thus more difficult to improve our balance of payments position, and stem the flow of gold. And it is necessary to stem it for our national security, if we are going to pay for our security commitments abroad. And it would surely handicap our efforts to induce other industries and unions to adopt responsible price and wage policies.


(5) The facts of the matter are that there is no justification for an increase in the steel prices. The recent settlement between the industry and the union, which does not even take place until July 1st, was widely acknowledged to be non-inflationary, and the whole purpose and effect of this Administration's role, which both parties understood, was to achieve an agreement which would make unnecessary any increase in prices...


(6) The cost of major raw materials, steel scrap and coal, has been declining, and for an industry which has been generally operating at less than two-thirds of capacity, its profit rate has been normal and can be expected to rise sharply this year in view of the reduction in idle capacity. Their lot has been easier than that of a hundred thousand steel workers thrown out of work in the last three years. The industry's cash dividends have exceeded 600 million dollars in each of the last five years, and earnings in the first quarter of this year were estimated in the February 28th Wall Street Journal to be among the highest in history.


(7) In short, at a time when they could be exploring how more efficiency and better prices could be obtained, reducing prices in this industry in recognition of lower costs, their unusually good labor contract, their foreign competition and their increase in production and profits which are coming this year, a few gigantic corporations have decided to increase prices in ruthless disregard of their public responsibilities...


(8)...Some time ago I asked each American to consider what he would do for his country and I asked the steel companies. In the last 24 hours, we had their answer.


Overall, the speaker's tone might best be described as (3 points)


conciliatory and resigned


concerned and caustic


matter-of-fact and resigned


disapproving and belligerent


impassioned and accusatory


Question 5

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


The following excerpt is from a news conference given by President Kennedy in 1962.


(1) Simultaneous and identical actions of United States Steel and other leading steel corporations, increasing steel prices by some six dollars a ton, constitute a wholly unjustifiable and irresponsible defiance of the public interest.


(2) In this serious hour in our nation's history, when we are confronted with grave crises in Berlin and Southeast Asia, when we are devoting our energies to economic recovery and stability, when we are asking Reservists to leave their homes and families for months on end, and servicemen to risk their lives -- and four were killed in the last two days in Viet Nam -- and asking union members to hold down their wage requests, at a time when restraint and sacrifice are being asked of every citizen, the American people will find it hard, as I do, to accept a situation in which a tiny handful of steel executives whose pursuit of private power and profit exceeds their sense of public responsibility can show such utter contempt for the interests of 185 million Americans.


(3) If this rise in the cost of steel is imitated by the rest of the industry, instead of rescinded, it would increase the cost of homes, autos, appliances, and most other items for every American family. It would increase the cost of machinery and tools to every American businessman and farmer. It would seriously handicap our efforts to prevent an inflationary spiral from eating up the pensions of our older citizens, and our new gains in purchasing power.


(4) It would add, Secretary McNamara informed me this morning, an estimated one billion dollars to the cost of our defenses, at a time when every dollar is needed for national security and other purposes. It would make it more difficult for American goods to compete in foreign markets, more difficult to withstand competition from foreign imports, and thus more difficult to improve our balance of payments position, and stem the flow of gold. And it is necessary to stem it for our national security, if we are going to pay for our security commitments abroad. And it would surely handicap our efforts to induce other industries and unions to adopt responsible price and wage policies.


(5) The facts of the matter are that there is no justification for an increase in the steel prices. The recent settlement between the industry and the union, which does not even take place until July 1st, was widely acknowledged to be non-inflationary, and the whole purpose and effect of this Administration's role, which both parties understood, was to achieve an agreement which would make unnecessary any increase in prices...


(6) The cost of major raw materials, steel scrap and coal, has been declining, and for an industry which has been generally operating at less than two-thirds of capacity, its profit rate has been normal and can be expected to rise sharply this year in view of the reduction in idle capacity. Their lot has been easier than that of a hundred thousand steel workers thrown out of work in the last three years. The industry's cash dividends have exceeded 600 million dollars in each of the last five years, and earnings in the first quarter of this year were estimated in the February 28th Wall Street Journal to be among the highest in history.


(7) In short, at a time when they could be exploring how more efficiency and better prices could be obtained, reducing prices in this industry in recognition of lower costs, their unusually good labor contract, their foreign competition and their increase in production and profits which are coming this year, a few gigantic corporations have decided to increase prices in ruthless disregard of their public responsibilities...


(8)...Some time ago I asked each American to consider what he would do for his country and I asked the steel companies. In the last 24 hours, we had their answer.


Overall, which of the following best describes the function of the second paragraph of the passage? (3 points)


It provides the foundation on which Kennedy will call for a boycott of steel.


It establishes a sense of patriotism through which Kennedy will develop his speech.


It defines the reasons for Kennedy's frustration with the steel company executives.


It itemizes the grievances Kennedy will then use to rally the audience to action.


It explains the conditions Kennedy will claim are contributing to the rise in steel prices.


Question 6

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


The following excerpt is from a news conference given by President Kennedy in 1962.


(1) Simultaneous and identical actions of United States Steel and other leading steel corporations, increasing steel prices by some six dollars a ton, constitute a wholly unjustifiable and irresponsible defiance of the public interest.


(2) In this serious hour in our nation's history, when we are confronted with grave crises in Berlin and Southeast Asia, when we are devoting our energies to economic recovery and stability, when we are asking Reservists to leave their homes and families for months on end, and servicemen to risk their lives -- and four were killed in the last two days in Viet Nam -- and asking union members to hold down their wage requests, at a time when restraint and sacrifice are being asked of every citizen, the American people will find it hard, as I do, to accept a situation in which a tiny handful of steel executives whose pursuit of private power and profit exceeds their sense of public responsibility can show such utter contempt for the interests of 185 million Americans.


(3) If this rise in the cost of steel is imitated by the rest of the industry, instead of rescinded, it would increase the cost of homes, autos, appliances, and most other items for every American family. It would increase the cost of machinery and tools to every American businessman and farmer. It would seriously handicap our efforts to prevent an inflationary spiral from eating up the pensions of our older citizens, and our new gains in purchasing power.


(4) It would add, Secretary McNamara informed me this morning, an estimated one billion dollars to the cost of our defenses, at a time when every dollar is needed for national security and other purposes. It would make it more difficult for American goods to compete in foreign markets, more difficult to withstand competition from foreign imports, and thus more difficult to improve our balance of payments position, and stem the flow of gold. And it is necessary to stem it for our national security, if we are going to pay for our security commitments abroad. And it would surely handicap our efforts to induce other industries and unions to adopt responsible price and wage policies.


(5) The facts of the matter are that there is no justification for an increase in the steel prices. The recent settlement between the industry and the union, which does not even take place until July 1st, was widely acknowledged to be non-inflationary, and the whole purpose and effect of this Administration's role, which both parties understood, was to achieve an agreement which would make unnecessary any increase in prices...


(6) The cost of major raw materials, steel scrap and coal, has been declining, and for an industry which has been generally operating at less than two-thirds of capacity, its profit rate has been normal and can be expected to rise sharply this year in view of the reduction in idle capacity. Their lot has been easier than that of a hundred thousand steel workers thrown out of work in the last three years. The industry's cash dividends have exceeded 600 million dollars in each of the last five years, and earnings in the first quarter of this year were estimated in the February 28th Wall Street Journal to be among the highest in history.


(7) In short, at a time when they could be exploring how more efficiency and better prices could be obtained, reducing prices in this industry in recognition of lower costs, their unusually good labor contract, their foreign competition and their increase in production and profits which are coming this year, a few gigantic corporations have decided to increase prices in ruthless disregard of their public responsibilities...


(8)...Some time ago I asked each American to consider what he would do for his country and I asked the steel companies. In the last 24 hours, we had their answer.


Kennedy's primary purpose in this speech is to (3 points)


rally the audience to boycott steel companies


condemn the companies that raised steel prices


argue for greater sacrifice from the audience


convince the steel union to stage an employee strike


provide a call to action for the audience listening


Question 7

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


The following excerpt is from a news conference given by President Kennedy in 1962.


(1) Simultaneous and identical actions of United States Steel and other leading steel corporations, increasing steel prices by some six dollars a ton, constitute a wholly unjustifiable and irresponsible defiance of the public interest.


(2) In this serious hour in our nation's history, when we are confronted with grave crises in Berlin and Southeast Asia, when we are devoting our energies to economic recovery and stability, when we are asking Reservists to leave their homes and families for months on end, and servicemen to risk their lives -- and four were killed in the last two days in Viet Nam -- and asking union members to hold down their wage requests, at a time when restraint and sacrifice are being asked of every citizen, the American people will find it hard, as I do, to accept a situation in which a tiny handful of steel executives whose pursuit of private power and profit exceeds their sense of public responsibility can show such utter contempt for the interests of 185 million Americans.


(3) If this rise in the cost of steel is imitated by the rest of the industry, instead of rescinded, it would increase the cost of homes, autos, appliances, and most other items for every American family. It would increase the cost of machinery and tools to every American businessman and farmer. It would seriously handicap our efforts to prevent an inflationary spiral from eating up the pensions of our older citizens, and our new gains in purchasing power.


(4) It would add, Secretary McNamara informed me this morning, an estimated one billion dollars to the cost of our defenses, at a time when every dollar is needed for national security and other purposes. It would make it more difficult for American goods to compete in foreign markets, more difficult to withstand competition from foreign imports, and thus more difficult to improve our balance of payments position, and stem the flow of gold. And it is necessary to stem it for our national security, if we are going to pay for our security commitments abroad. And it would surely handicap our efforts to induce other industries and unions to adopt responsible price and wage policies.


(5) The facts of the matter are that there is no justification for an increase in the steel prices. The recent settlement between the industry and the union, which does not even take place until July 1st, was widely acknowledged to be non-inflationary, and the whole purpose and effect of this Administration's role, which both parties understood, was to achieve an agreement which would make unnecessary any increase in prices...


(6) The cost of major raw materials, steel scrap and coal, has been declining, and for an industry which has been generally operating at less than two-thirds of capacity, its profit rate has been normal and can be expected to rise sharply this year in view of the reduction in idle capacity. Their lot has been easier than that of a hundred thousand steel workers thrown out of work in the last three years. The industry's cash dividends have exceeded 600 million dollars in each of the last five years, and earnings in the first quarter of this year were estimated in the February 28th Wall Street Journal to be among the highest in history.


(7) In short, at a time when they could be exploring how more efficiency and better prices could be obtained, reducing prices in this industry in recognition of lower costs, their unusually good labor contract, their foreign competition and their increase in production and profits which are coming this year, a few gigantic corporations have decided to increase prices in ruthless disregard of their public responsibilities...


(8)...Some time ago I asked each American to consider what he would do for his country and I asked the steel companies. In the last 24 hours, we had their answer.


The use of the pronoun "we" in the final sentence of this excerpt ("...we had their answer.") (3 points)


clarifies that Kennedy is speaking about executives, not steel company workers


identifies the group of Americans making the greatest sacrifice during this time


establishes Kennedy's authority over American people and their corporations


unites Kennedy with the everyday Americans to whom he is speaking


reiterates the sacrifices that American industry is making at the moment


Question 8

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


The following is taken from a passage written by the famed naturalist, John Muir.


(1) The immortal Linnaeus—Carl von Linné—was born in Sweden, a cold rocky country now famous forever. (2) He was born in the bloom-time of the year, May 13th, 1707; and in pondering the significance of his birth, one might stop to give thanks and reflect on the wonderful inspiration his life would come to serve.


(3) Whether descended from sea-kings and pirates as is most likely, or from fighting Normans or goths, matters not; for he was a lover sent of God to revive and cheer and bless all mankind. (4) And this he did in spite of crushing poverty, and all the black brood of disappointments and discouragements that ever beset the onway of genius. (5) His parents were as poor and pious as the parents of great men usually are. (6) He was a naturalist from his birth, and reveled in the bloom of the fields and gardens about his native village of Rashult as naturally as a bee. (7) By his steady, slow-going neighbors, he was looked on as one possessed.


(8) His father, a minister, naturally wished his son to follow in his footsteps, and so he pinched pennies and saved money to send young Carl to school with this end in view. (9) But the studies leading to the ministry did not interest the lad, and like other divine boys he was called a dunce. (10) Accordingly, when his father visited the school and anxiously inquired how Carl was getting on, he was bluntly told that the boy was dull, had no brains, and could never be made into a minister or scholar of any kind. (11) Under these dark circumstances, the best advice the schoolmaster was able to offer the discouraged father was to take away his boy and make a tailor or a shoemaker of him.


(12) Yet this was the boy who was to do the most of all for many generations to open men's eyes to see the beauty of God's gardens and the creatures that enliven them.


Which version of the underlined text in sentence 8 (reproduced below) best matches the tone and style of the passage?


His father, a minister, naturally wished his son to follow in his footsteps, and so he pinched pennies to send young Carl to school with this end in view. (3 points)


and despite some reluctance, saved his money


and under duress from his wife and son saved money


(as it is now)


and with commendable self-denial saved money


and agreed to save the family's surplus money


Question 9

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


The following excerpt is from a news conference given by President Kennedy in 1962.


(1) Simultaneous and identical actions of United States Steel and other leading steel corporations, increasing steel prices by some six dollars a ton, constitute a wholly unjustifiable and irresponsible defiance of the public interest.


(2) In this serious hour in our nation's history, when we are confronted with grave crises in Berlin and Southeast Asia, when we are devoting our energies to economic recovery and stability, when we are asking Reservists to leave their homes and families for months on end, and servicemen to risk their lives -- and four were killed in the last two days in Viet Nam -- and asking union members to hold down their wage requests, at a time when restraint and sacrifice are being asked of every citizen, the American people will find it hard, as I do, to accept a situation in which a tiny handful of steel executives whose pursuit of private power and profit exceeds their sense of public responsibility can show such utter contempt for the interests of 185 million Americans.


(3) If this rise in the cost of steel is imitated by the rest of the industry, instead of rescinded, it would increase the cost of homes, autos, appliances, and most other items for every American family. It would increase the cost of machinery and tools to every American businessman and farmer. It would seriously handicap our efforts to prevent an inflationary spiral from eating up the pensions of our older citizens, and our new gains in purchasing power.


(4) It would add, Secretary McNamara informed me this morning, an estimated one billion dollars to the cost of our defenses, at a time when every dollar is needed for national security and other purposes. It would make it more difficult for American goods to compete in foreign markets, more difficult to withstand competition from foreign imports, and thus more difficult to improve our balance of payments position, and stem the flow of gold. And it is necessary to stem it for our national security, if we are going to pay for our security commitments abroad. And it would surely handicap our efforts to induce other industries and unions to adopt responsible price and wage policies.


(5) The facts of the matter are that there is no justification for an increase in the steel prices. The recent settlement between the industry and the union, which does not even take place until July 1st, was widely acknowledged to be non-inflationary, and the whole purpose and effect of this Administration's role, which both parties understood, was to achieve an agreement which would make unnecessary any increase in prices...


(6) The cost of major raw materials, steel scrap and coal, has been declining, and for an industry which has been generally operating at less than two-thirds of capacity, its profit rate has been normal and can be expected to rise sharply this year in view of the reduction in idle capacity. Their lot has been easier than that of a hundred thousand steel workers thrown out of work in the last three years. The industry's cash dividends have exceeded 600 million dollars in each of the last five years, and earnings in the first quarter of this year were estimated in the February 28th Wall Street Journal to be among the highest in history.


(7) In short, at a time when they could be exploring how more efficiency and better prices could be obtained, reducing prices in this industry in recognition of lower costs, their unusually good labor contract, their foreign competition and their increase in production and profits which are coming this year, a few gigantic corporations have decided to increase prices in ruthless disregard of their public responsibilities...


(8)...Some time ago I asked each American to consider what he would do for his country and I asked the steel companies. In the last 24 hours, we had their answer.


The rhetorical purpose of the second half of paragraph two ("American people will find it hard...for the interest of 185 million Americans") is to (3 points)


identify further the sacrifices that will result from the elevated steel prices


unite Americans in their mission to boycott the steel industry and its products


isolate the greedy steel executives from the hardworking everyday Americans


condemn the entire steel industry and its workers on behalf of the American public


reiterate that the steel industry is to blame for the recession and necessary sacrifices



Question 10

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


The following is taken from a passage written by the famed naturalist, John Muir.


(1) The immortal Linnaeus—Carl von Linné—was born in Sweden, a cold rocky country now famous forever. (2) He was born in the bloom-time of the year, May 13th, 1707; and in pondering the significance of his birth, one might stop to give thanks and reflect on the wonderful inspiration his life would come to serve.


(3) Whether descended from sea-kings and pirates as is most likely, or from fighting Normans or goths, matters not; for he was a lover sent of God to revive and cheer and bless all mankind. (4) And this he did in spite of crushing poverty, and all the black brood of disappointments and discouragements that ever beset the onway of genius. (5) His parents were as poor and pious as the parents of great men usually are. (6) He was a naturalist from his birth, and reveled in the bloom of the fields and gardens about his native village of Rashult as naturally as a bee. (7) By his steady, slow-going neighbors, he was looked on as one possessed.


(8) His father, a minister, naturally wished his son to follow in his footsteps, and so he pinched pennies and saved money to send young Carl to school with this end in view. (9) But the studies leading to the ministry did not interest the lad, and like other divine boys he was called a dunce. (10) Accordingly, when his father visited the school and anxiously inquired how Carl was getting on, he was bluntly told that the boy was dull, had no brains, and could never be made into a minister or scholar of any kind. (11) Under these dark circumstances, the best advice the schoolmaster was able to offer the discouraged father was to take away his boy and make a tailor or a shoemaker of him.


(12) Yet this was the boy who was to do the most of all for many generations to open men's eyes to see the beauty of God's gardens and the creatures that enliven them.


The writer is considering deleting the underlined clause in sentence 3 (reproduced below) and adjusting the punctuation as necessary.


Whether descended from sea-kings and pirates as is most likely, or from fighting Normans or goths, matters not; for he was a lover sent of God to revive and cheer and bless all mankind.


Should the writer keep or delete the underlined text? (3 points)


Keep it, because it provides useful information which sheds light on the path Linnaeus would choose later in life.


Delete it, because it interferes with the flow of the paragraph by introducing information that is irrelevant.


Keep it, because without this information the audience will not fully understand the rest of the passage.


Keep it, because it provides imagery that appeals to the audience and enriches the story of Linnaeus's culture and upbringing.


Delete it, because it contradicts the writer's view of Linnaeus, which will be developed later in the passage.

Answer & Explanation
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dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesqu

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sus ante,

iscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus a

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