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Can someone please check my work and explain the correct answer. I would appreciate it very much!Question 1

Read the following excerpt carefully before you choose your answer.


This excerpt is taken from a letter written by a father to his son.


"Do not think that I mean to dictate as a parent; I only mean to advise as a friend, and an indulgent one too: and do not apprehend that I mean to check your pleasures; of which, on the contrary, I only desire to be the guide, not the censor."


Which of the following best summarizes the message of the excerpt?

 Advice from the elderly should be scrutinized before consideration.

 The writer means to offer guidance to help rather than to control. <-------------------------

 The writer is skeptical about his qualifications to dispense advice.

 The youthful, in general, are too immature to receive advice.

 Advice from the elderly should be followed without question.


Question 2

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.


"In the Reichstag a few moments ago, I saw a display commemorating this 40th anniversary of the Marshall Plan. I was struck by the sign on a burnt-out, gutted structure that was being rebuilt. I understand that Berliners of my own generation can remember seeing signs like it dotted throughout the western sectors of the city. The sign read simply: 'The Marshall Plan is helping here to strengthen the free world.' A strong, free world in the West, that dream became real. Japan rose from ruin to become an economic giant. Italy, France, Belgium—virtually every nation in Western Europe saw political and economic rebirth; the European Community was founded."


Which rhetorical strategy does the speaker adopt in this paragraph?

 He uses personification to describe the development of a longstanding American policy.

 He goes on the offensive by berating the wartime policies of his opponents.

 He compares the failure of the Marshall Plan to the havoc created by endless wars.

 He uses metaphors and similes to acknowledge the failure of the Marshall Plan. <----------------------------------

 He uses connotative language and examples to describe the success of the Marshall Plan.


Question 3

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.


"Behind me stands a wall that encircles the free sectors of this city, part of a vast system of barriers that divides the entire continent of Europe. From the Baltic, south, those barriers cut across Germany in a gash of barbed wire, concrete, dog runs, and guard towers. Farther south, there may be no visible, no obvious wall. But there remain armed guards and checkpoints all the same—still a restriction on the right to travel, still an instrument to impose upon ordinary men and women the will of a totalitarian state. Yet it is here in Berlin where the wall emerges most clearly; here, cutting across your city, where the news photo and the television screen have imprinted this brutal division of a continent upon the mind of the world. Standing before the Brandenburg Gate, every man is a German, separated from his fellow men. Every man is a Berliner, forced to look upon a scar."


In this paragraph, the speaker uses all of the following EXCEPT

 simile

 imagery

 metaphor

 motif

 anaphora <--------------------


Question 4

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


This passage is taken from a book that chronicles a man's exploration of Alaska.


(1)It was now near dark, and I made haste to make up my flimsy little tent. The ground was desperately rocky. I made out, however, to level down a strip large enough to lie on, and by means of slim alder stems bent over it and tied together soon had a home. While thus busily engaged I was startled by a thundering roar across the lake. Running to the top of the moraine, I discovered that the tremendous noise was only the outcry of a newborn berg about fifty or sixty feet in diameter, rocking and wallowing in the waves it had raised as if enjoying its freedom after its long grinding work as part of the glacier. After this fine last lesson I managed to make a small fire out of wet twigs, got a cup of tea, stripped off my dripping clothing, wrapped myself in a blanket and lay brooding on the gains of the day and plans for the morrow, glad, rich, and almost comfortable.


(2)It was raining hard when I awoke, but I made up my mind to disregard the weather, put on my dripping clothing, glad to know it was fresh and clean; ate biscuits and a piece of dried salmon without attempting to make a tea fire; filled a bag with hardtack, slung it over my shoulder, and with my indispensable ice-axe plunged once more into the dripping jungle. I found my bridge holding bravely in place against the swollen torrent, crossed it and beat my way around pools and logs and through two hours of tangle back to the moraine on the north side of the outlet,—a wet, weary battle but not without enjoyment. The smell of the washed ground and vegetation made every breath a pleasure, and I found Calypso borealis1, the first I had seen on this side of the continent, one of my darlings, worth any amount of hardship; and I saw one of my Douglas squirrels on the margin of the grassy pool. The drip of the rain on the various leaves was pleasant to hear. More especially marked were the flat low-toned bumps and splashes of large drops from the trees on the broad horizontal leaves of Echinopanax horridum2, like the drumming of thundershower drops on veratrum and palm leaves, while the mosses were indescribably beautiful, so fresh, so bright, so cheerily green, and all so low and calm and silent, however heavy and wild the wind and the rain blowing and pouring above them. Surely never a particle of dust has touched leaf or crown of all these blessed mosses; and how bright were the red rims of the cladonia cups beside them, and the fruit of the dwarf cornel! And the wet berries, Nature's precious jewelry, how beautiful they were!—huckleberries with pale bloom and a crystal drop on each; red and yellow salmon-berries, with clusters of smaller drops; and the glittering, berry-like raindrops adorning the interlacing arches of bent grasses and sedges around the edges of the pools, every drop a mirror with all the landscape in it. A' that and a' that and twice as muckle's a' that in this glorious Alaska day3, recalling, however different, George Herbert's "Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright.4"


(3)In the gardens and forests of this wonderful moraine one might spend a whole joyful life.


1 A rare orchid found in northern, mountainous areas.

2Also called Devil's Club, Echinopanax is a large-leafed shrub that grows in moist, dense forests mostly in the Pacific Northwest of the United States.

3 Reference to Scottish poet, Robert Burns's poem that rejoices over the wide variety of positive traits in his wife.

4 Reference to a George Herbert poem that celebrates the glory found in nature and mourns the fact that it all must die.



When the passage moves from the first paragraph to the second, it also moves from

 overview to illustration

 action to observation

 analysis to argumentation

 assertion to definition <---------------------------------

 past to present


Question 5

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


This passage is taken from the concluding remarks of a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.


(11)And now the Soviets themselves may, in a limited way, be coming to understand the importance of freedom. We hear much from Moscow about a new policy of reform and openness. Some political prisoners have been released. Certain foreign news broadcasts are no longer being jammed. Some economic enterprises have been permitted to operate with greater freedom from state control.


(12)Are these the beginnings of profound changes in the Soviet state? Or are they token gestures, intended to raise false hopes in the West, or to strengthen the Soviet system without changing it? We welcome change and openness; for we believe that freedom and security go together, that the advance of human liberty can only strengthen the cause of world peace. There is one sign the Soviets can make that would be unmistakable, that would advance dramatically the cause of freedom and peace.


(13)General Secretary Gorbachev, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!


Which of the following best describes the shift in tone that occurs from paragraph 11 to paragraph 13?

 Compromising to factual

 Hopeful to demanding

 Apologetic to emotional

 Accusing to flattering

 Subtle to enthusiastic <-------------------------------


Question 6

Read the following excerpt carefully before you choose your answer.


This excerpt is taken from a letter written by a father to his son.


"In this latter case, your shame and regret must be greater than anybody's, because everybody knows the uncommon care which has been taken of your education, and the opportunities you have had of knowing more than others of your age. I do not confine the application which I recommend, singly to the view and emulation of excelling others (though that is a very sensible pleasure and a very I warrantable pride); but I mean likewise to excel in the thing itself: for, in my mind, one may as well not know a thing at all, as know it but imperfectly. To know a little of anything, gives neither satisfaction nor credit, but often brings disgrace or ridicule."


In context, the phrase "application which I recommend" is best understood as the

 college I advocate

 career I endorse

 path I suggest <----------------------------------

 spouse I prefer

 affiliation I praise


Question 7

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


This passage is taken from a letter written by a father to his son.


DEAR BOY,                                                                                                      Bath, October the 4th, O. S. 1746.


Though I employ so much of my time in writing to you, I confess I have often my doubts whether it is to any purpose. I know how unwelcome advice generally is; I know that those who want it most like it and follow it least; and I know, too, that the advice of parents, more particularly, is ascribed to the moroseness, the imperiousness, or the garrulity of old age. But then, on the other hand, I flatter myself, that as your own reason (though too young as yet to suggest much to you of itself) is, however, strong enough to enable you both to judge of and receive plain truths: I flatter myself, I say, that your own reason, young as it is, must tell you, that I can have no interest but yours in the advice I give you; and that, consequently, you will at least weigh and consider it well: in which case, some of it will, I hope, have its effect. Do not think that I mean to dictate as a parent; I only mean to advise as a friend, and an indulgent one too: and do not apprehend that I mean to check your pleasures; of which, on the contrary, I only desire to be the guide, not the censor. Let my experience supply your want of it, and clear your way in the progress of your youth of those thorns and briers which scratched and disfigured me in the course of mine. I do not, therefore, so much as hint to you how absolutely dependent you are upon me; that you neither have nor can have a shilling in the world but from me; and that, as I have no womanish weakness for your person, your merit must and will be the only measure of my kindness. I say, I do not hint these things to you, because I am convinced that you will act right upon more noble and generous principles; I mean, for the sake of doing right, and out of affection and gratitude to me.


I have so often recommended to you attention and application to whatever you learn, that I do not mention them now as duties, but I point them out to you as conducive, nay, absolutely necessary, to your pleasures; for can there be a greater pleasure than to be universally allowed to excel those of one's own age and manner of life? And, consequently, can there be anything more mortifying than to be excelled by them? In this latter case, your shame and regret must be greater than anybody's, because everybody knows the uncommon care which has been taken of your education, and the opportunities you have had of knowing more than others of your age. I do not confine the application which I recommend, singly to the view and emulation of excelling others (though that is a very sensible pleasure and a very I warrantable pride); but I mean likewise to excel in the thing itself: for, in my mind, one may as well not know a thing at all, as know it but imperfectly. To know a little of anything, gives neither satisfaction nor credit, but often brings disgrace or ridicule.


Which of the following phrases does the author use to illustrate the notion of possessing good character?

 "act right upon more noble and generous principles" <----------------------------------

 "uncommon care which has been taken of your education"

 "you neither have nor can have a shilling in the world but from me"

 "can there be a greater pleasure than to be universally allowed to excel"

 "your merit must and will be the only measure of my kindness"


Question 8

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.


(4)Behind me stands a wall that encircles the free sectors of this city, part of a vast system of barriers that divides the entire continent of Europe. From the Baltic, south, those barriers cut across Germany in a gash of barbed wire, concrete, dog runs, and guard towers. Farther south, there may be no visible, no obvious wall. But there remain armed guards and checkpoints all the same—still a restriction on the right to travel, still an instrument to impose upon ordinary men and women the will of a totalitarian state. Yet it is here in Berlin where the wall emerges most clearly; here, cutting across your city, where the news photo and the television screen have imprinted this brutal division of a continent upon the mind of the world. Standing before the Brandenburg Gate, every man is a German, separated from his fellow men. Every man is a Berliner, forced to look upon a scar.


(5)President von Weizsacker has said, "The German question is open as long as the Brandenburg Gate is closed." Today I say: As long as the gate is closed, as long as this scar of a wall is permitted to stand, it is not the German question alone that remains open, but the question of freedom for all mankind. Yet I do not come here to lament. For I find in Berlin a message of hope, even in the shadow of this wall, a message of triumph.


The tone of paragraph four can best be described as

 conciliatory

 determined <--------------------

 indignant

 resolved

 humble


Question 9

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


This passage is taken from a letter written by a father to his son.


DEAR BOY,                                                                                                      Bath, October the 4th, O. S. 1746.


Though I employ so much of my time in writing to you, I confess I have often my doubts whether it is to any purpose. I know how unwelcome advice generally is; I know that those who want it most like it and follow it least; and I know, too, that the advice of parents, more particularly, is ascribed to the moroseness, the imperiousness, or the garrulity of old age. But then, on the other hand, I flatter myself, that as your own reason (though too young as yet to suggest much to you of itself) is, however, strong enough to enable you both to judge of and receive plain truths: I flatter myself, I say, that your own reason, young as it is, must tell you, that I can have no interest but yours in the advice I give you; and that, consequently, you will at least weigh and consider it well: in which case, some of it will, I hope, have its effect. Do not think that I mean to dictate as a parent; I only mean to advise as a friend, and an indulgent one too: and do not apprehend that I mean to check your pleasures; of which, on the contrary, I only desire to be the guide, not the censor. Let my experience supply your want of it, and clear your way in the progress of your youth of those thorns and briers which scratched and disfigured me in the course of mine. I do not, therefore, so much as hint to you how absolutely dependent you are upon me; that you neither have nor can have a shilling in the world but from me; and that, as I have no womanish weakness for your person, your merit must and will be the only measure of my kindness. I say, I do not hint these things to you, because I am convinced that you will act right upon more noble and generous principles; I mean, for the sake of doing right, and out of affection and gratitude to me.


I have so often recommended to you attention and application to whatever you learn, that I do not mention them now as duties, but I point them out to you as conducive, nay, absolutely necessary, to your pleasures; for can there be a greater pleasure than to be universally allowed to excel those of one's own age and manner of life? And, consequently, can there be anything more mortifying than to be excelled by them? In this latter case, your shame and regret must be greater than anybody's, because everybody knows the uncommon care which has been taken of your education, and the opportunities you have had of knowing more than others of your age. I do not confine the application which I recommend, singly to the view and emulation of excelling others (though that is a very sensible pleasure and a very I warrantable pride); but I mean likewise to excel in the thing itself: for, in my mind, one may as well not know a thing at all, as know it but imperfectly. To know a little of anything, gives neither satisfaction nor credit, but often brings disgrace or ridicule.


The purpose of paragraph two is to

 offer advice and a reminder of the recipient's duty to succeed <--------------------------------

 admonish the recipient in the hopes of advising and motivating him

 establish the writer's credentials and offer sympathetic advice

 plead with the recipient for an apology and request retribution

 list the grievances of the writer and demand a sincere apology


Question 10

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.


"In West Germany and here in Berlin, there took place an economic miracle, the Wirtschaftswunder. Adenauer, Erhard, Reuter, and other leaders understood the practical importance of liberty—that just as truth can flourish only when the journalist is given freedom of speech, so prosperity can come about only when the farmer and businessman enjoy economic freedom. The German leaders reduced tariffs, expanded free trade, lowered taxes. From 1950 to 1960 alone, the standard of living in West Germany and Berlin doubled."


In this paragraph, the speaker uses the German word "Wirtschaftswunder" to

 impress the German-speaking audience

 simplify the language in his explanation

 shift the tone from serious to playful

 emphasize the importance of the economic shift

 alienate those who do not understand German <-------------------------------------


Question 11

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


This passage is taken from the concluding remarks of a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.


(11)And now the Soviets themselves may, in a limited way, be coming to understand the importance of freedom. We hear much from Moscow about a new policy of reform and openness. Some political prisoners have been released. Certain foreign news broadcasts are no longer being jammed. Some economic enterprises have been permitted to operate with greater freedom from state control.


(12)Are these the beginnings of profound changes in the Soviet state? Or are they token gestures, intended to raise false hopes in the West, or to strengthen the Soviet system without changing it? We welcome change and openness; for we believe that freedom and security go together, that the advance of human liberty can only strengthen the cause of world peace. There is one sign the Soviets can make that would be unmistakable, that would advance dramatically the cause of freedom and peace.


(13)General Secretary Gorbachev, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!


In paragraph 13, the speaker mentions General Secretary Gorbachev by name hoping to

 blame Gorbachev for the tensions between the countries <-------------------------------------

 challenge Gorbachev to use his power and take action

 turn the audience against Gorbachev's policies

 appeal to Gorbachev's obvious sense of vanity

 harm Gorbachev's reputation as a world leader


Question 12

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.


This passage is taken from a book that chronicles a man's exploration of Alaska.


(1)It was now near dark, and I made haste to make up my flimsy little tent. The ground was desperately rocky. I made out, however, to level down a strip large enough to lie on, and by means of slim alder stems bent over it and tied together soon had a home. While thus busily engaged I was startled by a thundering roar across the lake. Running to the top of the moraine, I discovered that the tremendous noise was only the outcry of a newborn berg about fifty or sixty feet in diameter, rocking and wallowing in the waves it had raised as if enjoying its freedom after its long grinding work as part of the glacier. After this fine last lesson I managed to make a small fire out of wet twigs, got a cup of tea, stripped off my dripping clothing, wrapped myself in a blanket and lay brooding on the gains of the day and plans for the morrow, glad, rich, and almost comfortable.


(2)It was raining hard when I awoke, but I made up my mind to disregard the weather, put on my dripping clothing, glad to know it was fresh and clean; ate biscuits and a piece of dried salmon without attempting to make a tea fire; filled a bag with hardtack, slung it over my shoulder, and with my indispensable ice-axe plunged once more into the dripping jungle. I found my bridge holding bravely in place against the swollen torrent, crossed it and beat my way around pools and logs and through two hours of tangle back to the moraine on the north side of the outlet,—a wet, weary battle but not without enjoyment. The smell of the washed ground and vegetation made every breath a pleasure, and I found Calypso borealis1, the first I had seen on this side of the continent, one of my darlings, worth any amount of hardship; and I saw one of my Douglas squirrels on the margin of the grassy pool. The drip of the rain on the various leaves was pleasant to hear. More especially marked were the flat low-toned bumps and splashes of large drops from the trees on the broad horizontal leaves of Echinopanax horridum2, like the drumming of thundershower drops on veratrum and palm leaves, while the mosses were indescribably beautiful, so fresh, so bright, so cheerily green, and all so low and calm and silent, however heavy and wild the wind and the rain blowing and pouring above them. Surely never a particle of dust has touched leaf or crown of all these blessed mosses; and how bright were the red rims of the cladonia cups beside them, and the fruit of the dwarf cornel! And the wet berries, Nature's precious jewelry, how beautiful they were!—huckleberries with pale bloom and a crystal drop on each; red and yellow salmon-berries, with clusters of smaller drops; and the glittering, berry-like raindrops adorning the interlacing arches of bent grasses and sedges around the edges of the pools, every drop a mirror with all the landscape in it. A' that and a' that and twice as muckle's a' that in this glorious Alaska day3, recalling, however different, George Herbert's "Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright.4"


(3)In the gardens and forests of this wonderful moraine one might spend a whole joyful life.


1 A rare orchid found in northern, mountainous areas.

2Also called Devil's Club, Echinopanax is a large-leafed shrub that grows in moist, dense forests mostly in the Pacific Northwest of the United States.

3 Reference to Scottish poet, Robert Burns's poem that rejoices over the wide variety of positive traits in his wife.

4 Reference to a George Herbert poem that celebrates the glory found in nature and mourns the fact that it all must die.



What is the effect of the author's use of "my" in the excerpt, "... and I saw one of my Douglas squirrels on the margin of the grassy pool ..."?

 It convinces the reader that he owns the land he is exploring.

 It supports the notion that nature should be shared by all.

 It shows that he rejects the notion that nature can be owned.

 It reveals his desire to keep others away from his paradise. <-------------------------------------

 It demonstrates his personal connection with nature.

Answer & Explanation
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