View the step-by-step solution to:

Supervision of Curriculum and Instruction Notes Class #5 03/03/2016 EDSU 560 085 The bulk of this class will be focused on data tools. There are only...

Hello, I have a Final assignment and I need to get a full grade please. I uploaded the assignments and some documents that can help you to answer the questions.

Also, I uploaded the notes from my classes. I am sure It will help you. The assignments due Monday, Mar 14, 2016 at 10:00 PM Eastren time zone.


Nots: Please be aware to 

Accuracy and Understanding of Content, Administrative Philosophy, Informal Observation, Grammar & Spelling and Organization & Format.

  

Supervision of Curriculum and InstrucTon Notes Class #5 03/03/2016 EDSU 560 085 The bulk of this class will be focused on data tools. There are only six slides tonight and we will end talking about what to expect for the next class. Thanks to Sharif for the pizza, fruit and drinks! Class began with humorous slide re teacher evalua±on…Teacher with gun to head, standing in front of principal…”Your evalua±on wasn’t THAT bad.” Discussion/sharing from classmates… As you get to know your teachers, get to know their backgrounds…their experiences are all diFerent. We have expecta±ons when we interact with children versus people we supervise. There are lots of similari±es. ..but some±mes it is harder…worse…and requires more ²nesse for the people you supervise. RECAP from last week… Courageous conversa±ons… Who needs the most courage? Giver or receiver? Is there a right ±me and place? What if it doesn’t work? What if it does? How do you build on the momentum? Plan ahead…if and when I have this conversa±on, what do I need to consider? ³or example, ±me of day, is there a personal life event going on for this person, will the person, if upset, be able to ²nish the work day? With a courageous conversa±on there is always a teaching moment-they should walk away with something-yes and no-some±mes this happens and some±mes not. 1 | P a g e
Background image of page 1
Supervision of Curriculum and InstrucTon Notes Class #5 03/03/2016 EDSU 560 085 Example re conversaton wiTh a complaining/angry parenT…“Before I bring The Teacher in…leT’s go over whaT we know so far”….This mighT be info The parenT does noT know or he/she will be on The defensive. When The receiver comes back To you laTer To acknowledge The info you imparTed…you know you had a courageous conversaton. GeT adepT aT body language, which can calm a siTuaton and help someone To de-escalaTe. Build up and align yourself wiTh e.g. an angry parenT…seT The sTage…you have builT and are contnuing To build relatonships…LisTen…”you know I should suspend him…buT leT’s Try To come up wiTh anoTher soluton-you and me. We need To work TogeTher.” Sometmes iT is The receiver who has To be courageous To lisTen To whaT is going on wiTh Their child. Outcomes By the end of class, we will: Discuss and analyze informal observaton Tools and feedback. WhaT does ineFectve really mean versus whaT Teachers hear/inTerpreT? Discuss The purpose of posT observaton conferences and nexT sTeps. Identfy The componenTs of an assisTance/performance improvemenT plan. ClassmaTe re±ectons on Their informal assessmenT Tools and classroom observatons Dr. WebsTer said she has The framework. ..whaT The class brings To The Table esTablishes where we go. Feedback-purposes in an informal observaTon Build capaciTy in Teachers-an imporTanT reason why we give feedback Re±ecton 2 | P a g e
Background image of page 2
Show entire document
Supervision and Evaluaton of Curriculum and InsTructon NoTes-Class #4 02/25/2016 15 Students were in aTendance. ±hanks to Erika for the toasted bagels, fruit and tasty drinks! Per Dr. Webster, this evening we will discuss the format and what to focus on for the mid-term. Dr. Webster said she is crea²ng the exam and it will be very familiar. She stressed that everyone should do Fne. It will be a take home exam- so a liTle more involved than an in-class assignment. You will have the ²me and space to think about the items on the exam. Review of cartoon-talked about these things last week…how teachers feel when someone comes in….”drive-by educa²on experts”….”What are you doing wrong?” Shout out feedback from class. When we are walking in…in our supervisory role… to a classroom…we don’t know all of the dynamics. We will talk about the di³erent lenses through which you need to look in the schools…this ²es in directly to our work. Chris²ne Haynes shared a story about one of her Frst teaching assignments where there were very overt inequi²es. Per Dr. Webster, the ones who always lose…are the students. Always consider…whatever I do as a supervisor…how does it impact the children? In this instance, Fxed mindset served to prevent children’s gains. Recap….Is feedback about the giver, the receiver or the outcome? It’s about all three and how they interact with each other. Shout out from class. Outcomes for this class (see power point for full detail) Review the clinical supervision model as it relates to the “professional growth cycle Discuss and apply the four psych func²ons ´our teacher types Courageous conversa²ons 1 | P a g e
Background image of page 1
Supervision and Evaluaton of Curriculum and InsTructon NoTes-Class #4 02/25/2016 Dr. Webster said that from the Pajak text…there will be selected readings…don’t get lost in the Fu± or verbiage. See slide for “teacher evaluaTon” in power point….tonight’s focus is the big picture….the evaluaTon process is not as linear as it looks and many of the components are intertwined. Once you get to the post-conference reFecTon and feedback…you have some decisions to make….e.g. referral for support or assistance plan/PIP. What happens when the extra supports don’t work? ²he assistance plan says a lot of the same things. It is a 2-3 year process before you can get a teacher out the door. Unfortunately, some teachers can make a career out of being terrible. Now, most school districts won’t let ine±ecTve teacher transfer….so the principals rate them as “e±ecTve” so they can get rid of them. You must be e±ecTve and enlightened as to what works and does not. Discussed page 6 of the Pajak book. Most of these systems for evaluaTng are similar. Danielson is very similar. In analysis, the exit Tcket tells you…did the kids get it or not? Conceptually, could your students make the connecTons you wanted them to make? Did you get it??…thumbs up or down…it is a summary not an exit Tcket. ²he summary, exit Tcket and last acTvity are all DI³³EREN² things. Look at the quesTons to consider….like the post-conference analysis-you want teachers to come with their strengths and weaknesses-very important. If you can have honest discussions about what worked and not…that’s great. ²his can be where the “courageous conversaTons” come into play. What do you say ´rst?? If you know the lesson was terrible and the teacher thinks it was great??? Say something like “²ell me what you loved about this lesson” Hear their thinking then you can weave in your comments. Ask quesTons….and your quesTons will lead you where you need to go…the teacher will eventually get stumped….and that’s your opening….e.g. Why do you think it came o± that way? Don’t tell them it is horrible, but you lead them toward being reFecTve and discovering it themselves. You are doing your own metacogniTon and modeling for them. Get them to discover where the weaknesses are. ²his is why all along the evaluaTon 2 | P a g e
Background image of page 2
Show entire document
Supervision and Evaluaton of Curriculum and InsTructon-Class #2 02/11/16 Class started at 5:05 PM. Dr. Webster thanked everyone for a great Frst class last week. She commented on some of the re±ecTons that she has received. Housekeeping: New students introduced (2). Expect interacTve comments on homework assignments. You do not have to respond. ²able tents next week. ²hanks to ChrisTne for catering!! Possible to Fnish early. We are sTll laying foundaTons for the class today. Ice Breaker: comic strip re teacher burnout. Dr. Webster stated that every class will start with a recap of the prior week. “Speed date” acTvity-“Mindset” turn and talk. Dr. Webster asked the class…from the readings in Glickman and the You²ube video on mindset…what spoke to you? Discussion… GrowTh MindseT–Key PoinTs Enduring UndersTandings of Ricci’s work : ²here are inequiTes in educaTon Intelligence is malleable Consider the possibiliTes in all students-all students are valuable We cannot look at students through a lens of perceived intelligence-you assign them their intelligence based on the way they look, the way they talk, what you know about their family or culture. ²his applies to teachers also. ³ixed mindset says kids have certain amount of intelligence. ²he MAP test was discussed brie±y- it tells us about a student and adjusts up or down based on correct or incorrect answers. Dr. Webster said her school has been working really hard on test preparaTon. Did a pep rally-good results happening-e.g. a special educaTon student made a 20 point gain. Good teaching and the right strategies will help kids learn and be all they can be. ²his is what to think about as an administrator, when the teacher cites the composiTon of the class-e.g. ESOL, Sped, etc. as an explanaTon for her poor performance or the students’ lack of progress….this is why. Growth mindset says when students are exposed to good teaching and the right strategies, everyone CAN “get smarter”. Having a Fxed mindset undermines students’ willingness to take risks. Example-Fxed mindset-student saying “I don’t have any talent.” ²his is a VERY real issue. Page | 1
Background image of page 1
Building a growth mindset school culture: Deliberately culTvate self-conFdence, persistence and resilience in students. “Grit”…when you really dig in no ma±er what. Provide opportuniTes for students to work at their frustraTon level…then push through it. Example-How do you deal with a challenging parent when they say the work is too hard? It’s a life skill. Provide all students with access to a challenging curriculum. Praise what students do and use “yet”. Assumes success…not shu²ng kids down. As observing lessons as an administrator….what messages are going on? How? Why? ³amiliarize students with brain research. ³ailure is ok. Per Ricci and Dweck…don’s say “You got 8 wrong”…say, “You got two right…you’re not there yet.” ´his week add “yet” to your repertoire-to the conversaTon with yourself. Outcomes for today : By the end of class we will: (See outcomes in power point.) What is the purpose of supervision? Shout out acTvity. 3 types of supervision: 1. DirecTve 2. CollaboraTve 3. Non-direcTve (usually a mix of these-also depends on background, beliefs and personality of teacher and administrator…. .also your approach is impacted by the vision of your school leader) Purpose of supervision- to improve teaching and learning Discussion….about how to do it…. 1. Improve instrucTon, eµecTve instrucTon 2. Quality control-assess expected standards 3. Guidance 4. Develop teachers as professionals Discussion/Sharing How do you maintain the vision…yet provide the direcTon, e.g. a new teacher needs…or what is needed to change culture and climate to be less direcTve and more collaboraTve? Open communicaTon is a key strategy. CulTvate new leadership to get the message out. An administrator must pay a±enTon to the climate. As a new AP, you need to build trust with your principal. Page | 2
Background image of page 2
Show entire document
Supervision and Evaluaton of Curriculum and InsTructon Class NoTes-02/04/16 Dr. Webster welcomed the class members as they entered. She said she usually will allow 3-5 minutes at the start of the class for people to arrive. She showed some books and other resources and indicated that she will bring various items for each class, that students can access. Students can also borrow the materials. If there are topics of interest, she is happy to share. 5:05 PM Class started. There are 14 students in the class. Thirteen showed up this evening-one is not here due to recent birth of a baby girl. Dr. Webster said “Thank you for taking my class. Lots to do!” Class members took turns introducing themselves. “We are a family and will be one for 12 weeks. For reference…no dishonor around home and health. “ Everyone shared their background. Song… Isley Brothers….”Who Is That Lady?” Brain break. .lol. Dr. Webster reviewed her career path. Students will get book stu±, cool stu± and humor. Corny ac²vity. Classmate sharing…e.g. things that make you laugh…talking to self…comic books…call mother…family. This task was around rela²onship building…see each other as people and break down barriers. The idea of family must be cul²vated. Students o±ered up reac²ons of open ended ques²ons. Things that people don’t like….considera²on, mystery mess, injus²ce, abuse of power, kid nas²ness, being dismissed or ignored. We teach our sta± and our students to OWN their ac²ons. We can do that but we do so in a safe environment. Class will begin at 5 and usually end pre³y close to 8. Housekeeping. Style: Lots of fun, lots of work. Impossible to fail. Even though there is work to be done…professor will work with you. If need an extension…ask…but not the day an assignment is due. Snacks: everyone will take turns bringing something to class. Class Norms 1. Come on ²me, with a ´v- minute grace period. 2. Communicate if you will be late-via e-mail is best. Two-way communica²on. 3. Please ask ques²ons. 4. Be respecµul of the speaker. 5. Provide construc²ve feedback-both direc²ons; kickback/pushback. There will be lots of discussion about what is “real.” Also, you must be able to look forward so that you are prepared for there. How do you come up with innova²on if you do not have push back? We can add more norms and/or ground rules as we come along. Review of Syllabus We will hit ALL of the course objec²ves. They match our reading assignments. “ If we don’t hit it, I might send it to you for discussion and then we will talk about it the next class.” Alterna²ve e-mail: 1
Background image of page 1
[email protected] or the Morgan account in the syllabus. Phone number listed is cell phone. Feel free to phone or text. Have the 8 th ediTon preferred over the 9 th for the Glickman text. Should have the content-but di±erent page numbers. Book is mostly reference and won’t be used too o²en. Students will be told when they must bring books to class. Not a class for “teacher talk”. “Be engaged…it is about your learning and deposiTng into each other.” We need structures…but also must be creaTve. Students will be challenged. Walkthrough helps you to develop and sharpen your lens. Is it accessible for everyone? You will work with a team for the walkthrough. Response papers…an opportunity to poke holes…then ³nd the source which supports what you say…” I disagree. ..but so and so says…” InstrucTonal Improvement Plans, also called a performance improvement plan (PIP). Part of the class is de³ning or re³ning skills as an administrator. Final project will be based on video clips-not on-site in a school. For next class, read pages 92-104 and 288-293 in Glickman-see syllabus. Students are being set up to be successful. Important-Week 3-bring copies of tools being used in your evaluaTon and observaTon of teachers. Also put a star by the data collecTon in week 5 and re´ecTons. Response to µechnology Research will be based on handouts. µhe Glickman text is a very good tool to prepare for ISLLC…7 essays. If you keep your notes and are engaged you will do ³ne on the mid-term, which will cover from today on…and info will be chunked for you a class ahead. Power points will be put online. Review of Outcomes 1. Students will review the ISLLC Standards 2. Students will discuss and analyze the concept of vision 3. Students will discuss the concept of ³xed versus growth mindset (Carol Dweck) 4. ISµE Standard #1 It is not just about the students. You must take care of teachers…why a professional growth cycle should occur-not a “gotcha.” Don’t lose the a¶nity for that teacher…in the classroom-you must understand. Review of ISLLC Standards Look at the standards…so what? What does it mean? Now what? Where are you on the readiness spectrum? Not so ready-----Might pass------I got this! Professor will take a picture of the spectrum at the end of the class. µurn and talk acTvity with a partner. Discussed standards-overview of what the standards mean and how they frame the work in a school system. All school systems use these six standards in some form or fashion. µhey speak to all aspects of running a school system: vision, culture , management, community, ethics and social/poliTcs. SomeTmes we see ourselves as strong in some ways-we can grow in others. Discussed culturally responsive teaching as a characterisTc of Standard 6 (poliTca… social, economic, legal, and cultural context). Won’t work in every school….is it the actual strategy or the mindset of cultural responsiveness and how do I do what I can do to be culturally responsive….is it the strategy or the idea of being culturally responsible? Gather community collecTve. CollecTvely looking at these…if you were taking the test …where do you see yourself on the spectrum? 2
Background image of page 2
Show entire document
Supervision of Curriculum and InstrucTon Class #3 2/18/16 Notes Everyone gathered and began enjoying the shared food and fellowship. Miriam brought the food…roTsserie chicken, fresh fruit, juice, and Doritos. Yum! ±hanks! Jim announced an opportunity for the class members to see the movie “Paper ±igers” which tells the story of revoluTonary change at a school, Lincoln High School in Walawala, Washington, using a “trauma informed” approach. A Fyer describing the event was distributed. RegistraTon instrucTons are on the form. A²endees should say they were invited by the Engagement Center. ±he movie will be shown at BalTmore Polytechnic InsTtute auditorium on Wednesday, 03/02/16, at 5:30 PM. ±here is no charge. ±here is a trailer about the movie if you google “Paper ±igers”. Dr. Webster welcomed students to the class. She stressed that notes for tonight’s class are very important and that all of our discussion is not covered in detail by the power point. Class began at 5:13 with review of two cartoons. See power point for slides. Recap of last class As new approaches evolve do we abandon what came before or does it seem we just add on? ³or teachers, if they buy in…they o´en don’t go all the way…because this too will go away….again… and be replaced by something else. When the teachers DO buy-in and then there is more change…they o´en can have a negaTve and downhill reacTon. ±he goal is to get what worked before to work with the new ideas. What impact has this had on evaluators? ±eachers? Ideas go in and out of vogue. Discussion/shout out from the class. How will you as an evaluator resolve this in your own pracTce? ³or the die hard “di²o-ers”…try “one µnger at a Tme”. 1
Background image of page 1
You can’t get new results with the same old idea. What do you say when you get pushback from teachers regarding change? SomeTmes you just have to be more direcTve. Be open to feedback from teachers. It’s a lot about how you present the informaTon. Show respect for those above you as you lay out what is happening/changing…and you will be respected. ±ry it out yourself…so you understand it and what you are asking… so when you have grade-level conversaTons, for example, you can talk about how to make it work…how to bridge the old and the new. ±his creates the next level of work to get the teachers to buy in…especially if you are giving them resources for success. When you present something new/a change, anTcipate where you will get push back and be ready to answer back to the pushes. ±eachable moment… given the hot classroom this evening-the environment for teaching and learning ma²ers . For example, you have to show your support your teachers when things like a hot (temperature) classroom happen. Now, for ±oday…. Review of Outcomes…By the end of class we will: Discuss and evaluate the teacher evaluaTon process…see power point for remaining bullets of outcomes. ±eacher EvaluaTon…in a nutshell…there are many di³erent models. We will talk about the most common, and their components. Pre-conference re´ecTon-someTmes led by principal, AP or department chair ObservaTon Post-conference Re´ecTon-feedback-an opportunity to discuss, for example, why the faulty lesson reviewed in the pre-conference was not changed? ±here can really be a disconnect between the pre-conference and the lesson. If you as teacher had negaTve or suggesTve feedback for 2
Background image of page 2
Show entire document
70 EDUCATION NEXT / W I N T E R 2015 educationnext.org ILLUSTRATION / SARAH HANSON
Background image of page 1
research Does Better Observation Make Better Teachers? New evidence from a teacher evaluation pilot in Chicago OF A LL SCHO O L-LEVEL FACTORS related to student learning and achievement, the quality of the student’s teacher is the most important. Yet the teacher evaluation systems in use in American school districts historically have been unable to differentiate teachers who improve student learning from lower- performing educators. Many have failed to differentiate teachers at all. A 2009 study by The New Teacher Project found that “satisfac- tory” or “unsatisfactory” were the only ratings available to school administrators in many districts, and that more than 99 percent of teachers in those districts were deemed satisfactory. Improving methods for evaluating teacher performance and using the resulting information to change teaching practice has been a focus of recent reform efforts. According to the National Council on Teacher Quality, 32 states and the District of Columbia altered their teacher-evaluation policies in recent years to incor- porate multiple methods of assessing and evaluating teachers, spurred in part by the federal Race to the Top competition. And each of the 43 states to which the Obama administration has granted a waiver from No Child Left Behind is now in the pro- cess of implementing evaluation systems that employ multiple measures of classroom performance, including student achieve- ment data. These systems differentiate among three or more performance levels and are used to inform personnel decisions. While much of the debate over these new evaluation systems centers on their use of student test-score data to measure a teacher’s “value added” to student learning, classroom observa- tions remain critically important. Most teachers work in grades or subjects in which standardized tests are not administered and therefore will not have a value-added score. Even when students’ test scores are available, classroom observations may capture dimensions of teachers’ performance that are important but not reflected in those scores. Finally, value-added scores on their own do not tell teachers how they might improve their practice and thereby raise student achievement. We examine a unique intervention in Chicago Public Schools (CPS) to uncover the causal impact on school performance of an evaluation system based on highly structured classroom observations of teacher practice. An iterative process of observa- tion and conferencing focused on improving lesson planning and preparation, the classroom environment, and instructional techniques should drive positive changes in teacher practice. As teachers refine their skills and learn how best to respond to their students’ learning needs, student performance should improve. Recent evidence from Cincinnati Public Schools confirms that providing midcareer teachers with evaluative feedback based on the Danielson Framework for Teaching observation system can promote student-achievement growth in math, both during the school year in which the teacher is evaluated and in the years after evaluation (see “Can Teacher Evaluation Improve Teaching?” research, Fall 2012). The Excellence in Teaching Project (EITP), a teacher evalu- ation system also based on the Danielson framework, was piloted in Chicago Public Schools beginning in the fall of 2008. Leveraging the random assignment of schools to the EITP intervention, we find large effects of the intervention on school reading performance. The program had the largest impact in low-poverty and high-achieving schools but little or no impact in less-advantaged schools. These effects seem to be a consequence by MATTHEW P. STEINBERG AND LAUREN SARTAIN educationnext.org WINTER 2015/ EDUCATION NEXT 71
Background image of page 2
Show entire document
EDSU: SUPERVISION & EVALUATION OF CURRICULUM/INSTRUCTION Instructor: Dr. Katina F. Webster Week 2 Spring 2016
Background image of page 01
Background image of page 02
Show entire document
Instructor: Dr. Katina F. Webster Week 4 Spring 2016 EDSU: Supervision and Evaluation of Curriculum/Instruction
Background image of page 01
Background image of page 02
Show entire document
Final assignment Supervision and Evaluation of Curriculum & Instruction Part I. Scenarios 1. You have just been assigned to Webstertown Middle School. The staf will be mee±ng you For the ²rst ±me during pre-service week beFore school starts. Teacher morale is low and the school has experienced a lot oF change over the past two years. There are more new teachers than seasoned teachers and test scores in math have declined. 55% oF the staf surveyed believe the school will not be able to signi²cantly change the nega±ve percep±on oF Webstertown. What is your vision For Webstertown Middle School? Explain what might in³uence the development oF your vision. How will you deliver this vision and gain buy-in. What goals would you set? How would you priori±ze? 2. Teacher morale is low at Webstertown. Teachers feel unsupported and believe the evaluation process is unfair, subjective and lacks structure. Based on what you know about the purpose of supervision, the clinical model and mindsets, how would you address this? What potential challenges/obstacles might you face? What would you do to overcome the challenges? 3. You just landed your dream Principal job. Historically, the school you’ve been assigned to has been recognized as one of the best in the district. Test scores exceed county and state averages. All subgroups are showing growth at a rate higher than other schools across the district. To top it off, parents are engaged and extremely supportive! You are developing your entry plan and beginning to strategize. What would be your vision/plan for moving this school beyond great to extraordinary? 4. Students and parents are complaining about the new Reading teacher. She frequently makes negative comments to students in front of the class regarding their lack of reading progress. One parent has stated she will call the area superintendent’s office is the situation is not addressed. You decide to have a courageous conversation with Ms. Oblivious. What will you say? What next steps will you suggest? Part II: Submit draft of administrative philosophy. Part III: Informal Observation watch the clip http://www.bing.com/videos/search? q=teacher+videos+for+classroom+practice&&view=detail&mid=EE379F981D9071FBF156EE3 79F981D9071FBF156&FORM=VRDGAR . Use an informal tool of your choice complete and submit your observations, feedback and recommendations. Part IV: Reflection.
Background image of page 1
Based on your peer observations, was it difficult to view them through a supervisory lens? Why or why not? Did observing others influence your own practice? How did you benefit from the assignment?
Background image of page 2
24 E D U C A T I O N A L L E A D E R S H I P / A P R I L 2015 P eople get feedback all the time. When you serve a new dish at supper and your 5-year-old makes a face, that’s feedback. When you ask a friend if the outfit you just tried on looks good and she says, “Yes, you should buy it!” that’s feedback. When the little league team you coach wins a game and the team takes you to the ice cream store, that’s feedback. We’re going to tackle professional feedback here, by which we don’t mean a simple thumbs-up, thumbs- down review, but rather the kind of feedback that teaching colleagues, supervisors, or principals give fellow educators to improve instruction and student learning. Feedback of this sort should be done in the context of a collegial conversation and should support—indeed, help cause—profes- sional growth. 1 Our focus is on col- legial feedback to teachers in formative situations, meaning situations in which teachers are trying to learn and grow, not situations in which teachers are being evaluated to provide a score for a teacher evaluation system. Learning—It’s Supposed to Be Fun The purpose for giving formative feedback to teachers is to support their development as effective educators (Marzano, 2012; Mielke & Frontier, 2012). This only makes sense in schools in which a climate of learning and con- tinual improvement holds sway. Typically in schools, the learning climate that students experience mirrors the learning climate that teachers expe- rience. On one extreme, there’s the eval- uation or grading-oriented classroom climate, in which students believe their main goal is to be “right” or score well. On the other, there’s the learning- focused or mastery-oriented classroom climate, in which students understand F E D B A HOW TO GIVE Feedback should feed teacher learning forward, identifying next steps in a teacher’s learning journey. Susan M. Brookhart and Connie M. Moss
Background image of page 1
that making mistakes is necessary for learning and that learning is their main goal. Most classrooms—and schools— are somewhere in between these two extremes (Brookhart & Moss, 2013). In schools that focus more on learning, teachers and other educators set professional learning goals. A good way to approach a professional learning goal is to break it down into a trajectory of learning targets—knowledge and skills that can serve as mile markers toward the larger goal but are attainable in shorter periods of time; are smaller in scope; and provide opportunities for focused, descriptive, actionable feedback that will help the teacher hit the target and reach the professional goal (Moss & Brookhart, 2015). For example, suppose a teacher wanted to expand her use of student self-assessment and peer assessment in her middle school social studies classes. That would be her professional learning goal, which would comprise a trajectory of several learning targets. She might plan, for example, to have students use several different self- and peer assessment methods during a project they’re working on in class and ask her principal to observe. After the teacher tries one strategy, the principal might notice that she managed it well by pairing students appropriately, by assigning one color of sticky note for peer comments and a different color for student responses, and by giving students a chance to revise their work. But the principal might also notice that the strategy didn’t result in improved student work. Both observations would form part of the evidence that the principal and teacher might review in a collegial feedback conversation. The principal might suggest that unclear rubrics are part of the problem. This suggestion would be based on evidence, including A C K PROFESSIONAL JOZSEF BAGOTA/SHUTTERSTOCK
Background image of page 2
Show entire document
BCPS Informal Observation Tool Teacher: Date: Grade: Subject: School/Office: Administrator: Observer: Indicate a rating for components observed during the informal walk through observation and provide justification in the evidence/comments sections below. Refer to the Formal Observation Rubric for descriptions of teacher behaviors associated with each rating. N/O denotes not observed. Domain 1 – PLANNING AND PREPARATION Ineffective Developing Effective Highly Effective N/O 1a: Demonstrates Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy 1b: Demonstrates Knowledge of Students 1c: Selects Instructional Outcomes 1d: Demonstrates Knowledge of Resources 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction 1f: Designing Student Assessments Evidence/Comments: Domain 2 – THE CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT Ineffective Developing Effective Highly Effective N/O 2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport 2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning 2c: Managing Classroom Procedures 2d: Managing Student Behavior 2e. Organizing Physical Space Evidence/Comments: 1 BCPS Ofce oF Sta± RelaTons and Employee PerFormance Management ²eacher EvaluaTon – InFormal Walk ²hrough ObservaTon ²ool 10/9/14
Background image of page 1
Domain 3 - INSTRUCTION Ineffectiv e Developing Effective Highly Effective N/O 3a: Communicating with Students 3b: Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques 3c: Engaging Student in Learning 3d: Using Assessment in Instruction 3e: Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness Evidence/Comments: 2 BCPS Ofce oF Sta± RelaTons and Employee PerFormance Management ²eacher EvaluaTon – InFormal Walk ²hrough ObservaTon ²ool 10/9/14
Background image of page 2
ISLLC Standards The Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) Standards have recently been developed by the Council of Chief State School Officers in collaboration with the National Policy Board on Educational Administration (NPBEA) to help strengthen preparation programs in school leadership (Van Meter & Murphy, 1997). There are six standards. Each standard is followed by the K nowledge required for the standard, the Dispositions or attitudes manifest by the accomplishment of the standard, and Performances that could be observed by an administrator who is accomplished in the standard. Standard 1: A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community. Knowledge The administrator has knowledge and understanding of: learning goals in a pluralistic society the principles of developing and implementing strategic plans systems theory information sources, data collection, and data analysis strategies effective communication effective consensus-building and negotiation skills Dispositions The administrator believes in, values, and is committed to: the educability of all a school vision of high standards of learning continuous school improvement the inclusion of all members of the school community
Background image of page 01
ensuring that students have the knowledge, skills, and values needed to become successful adults a willingness to continuously examine one’s own assumptions, beliefs, and practices doing the work required for high levels of personal and organization performance Performances The administrator facilitates processes and engages in activities ensuring that: the vision and mission of the school are effectively communicated to staff, parents, students, and community members the vision and mission are communicated through the use of symbols, ceremonies, stories, and similar activities the core beliefs of the school vision are modeled for all stakeholders the vision is developed with and among stakeholders the contributions of school community members to the realization of the vision are recognized and celebrated progress toward the vision and mission is communicated to all stakeholders the school community is involved in school improvement efforts the vision shapes the educational programs, plans, and actions an implementation plan is developed in which objectives and strategies to achieve the vision and goals are clearly articulated assessment data related to student learning are used to develop the school vision and goals relevant demographic data pertaining to students and their families are used in developing the school mission and goals barriers to achieving the vision are identified, clarified, and addressed needed resources are sought and obtained to support the implementation of the school mission and goals
Background image of page 02
Show entire document