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Reflection 2 - Of Particular Interest We have now moved into discussing specific topics within the broader discipline of Human Geography. Review the

Reflection 2 - Of Particular Interest
We have now moved into discussing specific topics within the broader discipline of Human Geography. Review the lessons that have been available to you so far, as well as the associated textbook material. Is there something in particular among those topics, concepts, theories, et cetera that we have covered that particularly caught your attention? Include the following content in your reflection.

  1. (1 point) A creative title for your reflection.
  2. (4 points) Describe the concept, theory, map, or other issue in your own words. Be sure to identify all of the relevant details, including any or all of the following (if applicable):

the setting (that is, the location),

the people involved,

associated events, circumstances, or situations, and

how this topic (concept, theory, map, or other issue) is geographical in nature, given your understanding of the geographic perspective that we discuss in Lesson 1 and in Chapter 1 of your textbook.

  1. (4 points) Explain why the concept, theory, map, or other issue caught your attention; in other words, what are the reasons why you found it particularly interesting or attention-grabbing. Then discuss how learning about said topic ( concept, theory, map, or other issue ) has affected your worldview and, more specifically, how your perception and understanding of it has evolved after becoming more geographically informed (that is, reading the course materials to date).

In addressing this, be sure to make clear and specific connections with and references to the course material. In this part, it should be obvious to your instructor that you have read the material and gained knowledge.

  1. (4 points) Conclude your response by discussing any personal connection to the concept, theory, map, or other issue, and how a greater understanding and knowledge of it could benefit you in the future. Perhaps you never considered the topic before now, or maybe you have a background, interest, or pre-existing knowledge in the subject area. In this last part, you should draw a conclusion to your writing while sharing your thoughts and reflections.

Two points out of the total fifteen points for every journal entry are allocated for quality of writing and grammar.

General Requirements

  • Essay should be 400 to 600 words, typed, double-spaced.
  • Essays should clearly answer the assigned questions.

Guidelines For Constructing a Well-Written Reflection

Although reflections are somewhat less formal other types of writing assignments, they are still an academic exercise. All written work in this course should form a coherent narrative, use complete sentences, be grammatically correct, and scholarly in tone. Here are few guidelines to help you construct well-organized, well-written reflection.

  • Look at the assigned topics early so that you have it in the back of your mind while working on the course material.

After reading a lesson or text selection, spend some time jotting down your reactions, ideas, and responses to the readings. Consider specific elements, examples, or experiences you would like to include in your reflection.

  • You do not need a formal thesis statement, but making your central idea clear early on is important. Your first sentence should say what you are going to say in the rest of your entry--think of it as a main idea sentence or the main point of your writing.
  • Be sure you introduce any other new ideas with a topic sentence. Follow that sentence with information or evidence (taken from the texbook, outside sources, or your personal experiences) that justifies your opinion, reflection, criticism, or agreement.
  • Re-read your reflection before submitting it to check for grammatical/spelling errors, concise writing, and a coherent argument.

Reflection 2 - Of Particular Interest We have now moved into discussing specific topics within the broader discipline of Human Geography. Review the lessons that have been available to you so far, as well as the associated textbook material. Is there something in particular among those topics, concepts, theories, et cetera that we have covered that particularly caught your attention? Include the following content in your reflection. 1. (1 point) A creative title for your reflection . 2. (4 points) Describe the concept, theory, map, or other issue in your own words. Be sure to identify all of the relevant details, including any or all of the following ( if applicable): the setting (that is, the location), the people involved, associated events, circumstances, or situations, and how this topic (concept, theory, map, or other issue) is geographical in nature, given your understanding of the geographic perspective that we discuss in Lesson 1 and in Chapter 1 of your textbook. 3. (4 points) Explain why the concept, theory, map, or other issue caught your attention; in other words, what are the reasons why you found it particularly interesting or attention-grabbing. Then discuss how learning about said topic ( concept, theory, map, or other issue ) has affected your worldview and, more specifically, how your perception and understanding of it has evolved after becoming more geographically informed (that is, reading the course materials to date). In addressing this, be sure to make clear and specific connections with and references to the course material. In this part, it should be obvious to your instructor that you have read the material and gained knowledge. 4. (4 points) Conclude your response by discussing any personal connection to the concept, theory, map, or other issue, and how a greater understanding and knowledge of it could benefit you in the future. Perhaps you never considered the topic before now, or maybe you have a background, interest, or pre-existing knowledge in the subject area. In this last part, you should draw a conclusion to your writing while sharing your thoughts and reflections.
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Two points out of the total fifteen points for every journal entry are allocated for quality of writing and grammar. General Requirements Essay should be 400 to 600 words, typed, double-spaced. Essays should clearly answer the assigned questions. Guidelines For Constructing a Well-Written Reflection Although reflections are somewhat less formal other types of writing assignments, they are still an academic exercise. All written work in this course should form a coherent narrative, use complete sentences, be grammatically correct, and scholarly in tone . Here are few guidelines to help you construct well-organized, well-written reflection. Look at the assigned topics early so that you have it in the back of your mind while working on the course material. After reading a lesson or text selection, spend some time jotting down your reactions, ideas, and responses to the readings. Consider specific elements, examples, or experiences you would like to include in your reflection. You do not need a formal thesis statement, but making your central idea clear early on is important. Your first sentence should say what you are going to say in the rest of your entry--think of it as a main idea sentence or the main point of your writing. Be sure you introduce any other new ideas with a topic sentence. Follow that sentence with information or evidence (taken from the texbook, outside sources, or your personal experiences) that justifies your opinion, reflection, criticism, or agreement. Re-read your reflection before submitting it to check for grammatical/spelling errors, concise writing, and a coherent argument.
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Introduction Reconstructing human history is a difficult task, particularly when we are  dealing with pre-civilization societies. We have only physical artifacts such as  pottery shards, arrow points, skeletal fossils, or other remnants of a culture for  clues about how these people lived.  Archeology  (the study of physical artifacts) and  Anthropology  (the study of cultures) have provided most of the evidence of early humans and the civilizations that evolved from them thousands of years  ago.   Archaeological Dig at the Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge in Vermont (United  States).
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Image source: Photo Credit: Ken Sturm/USFWS in  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region,  usfwsnortheast (September 2013)  in Flickr.com made available through Creative Commons license [10  May2014]   There are many questions we can consider when we think about civilizations  and when/how primitive tribal organizations transitioned to more complex  civilizations. For example:
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Introduction What is population geography? As with other geographic phenomena,  people  have a spatial dimension that  invites geographic inquiry: Where are they located? What is their distribution?  How do they cluster? Why are they there? Where are they moving to? These  and other spatial questions form the basis of population geography , which we  will review in this lesson. Population geography  looks at variables associated with people: ages and  aging, births and deaths, growth rates, racial characteristics, and other human  population traits. These are also the variables of  demography , the study of  population and population change. However, unlike geographers,  demographers typically do not study the spatial aspects of population. For example, population is not evenly distributed on the earth's surface. Some  places are heavily populated and others have virtually no people. Thus,  explaining the uneven distribution of people is a basic concern of population  geography. Here is an example:  
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Map of Population Distribution across the Contiguous United States, 2010.   Each white dot on this map represents 7500 people and has been placed in  location that approximates the location of that group of people. The resulting  map gives you the impression of the distribution of people across the 
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Reflection 2 1 Reflection 2 Your Name (First M. Last)
School or Institution Name (University at Place or Town, State) Reflection 2 2
Urbanization The growing trend of urbanization over the years...

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