Question
Answered step-by-step

Question 1(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points) (06.03 MC) The following...

Question 1(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


The following excerpt comes from Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet.


MERCUTIO: "Nay, gentle Romeo, we must have you dance."


ROMEO: "Not I, believe me. You have dancing shoes with nimble soles; I have a soul of lead so stakes me to the ground I cannot move."


This excerpt features an example of

 allusion

 metaphor

 paradox

 pun

 understatement


Question 2(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


The play Hamlet features a number of climactic scenes within multiple acts. Which act and scene could be considered the climax of the play?

 Act I, scene i, when Horatio and the other guards see the ghost.

 Act II, scene i, when Ophelia tells her father of Hamlet's behavior.

 Act III, scene iv, when Hamlet accidentally stabs and kills Polonius.

 Act IV, scene iii, when Claudius sends Hamlet away to England.

 Act V, scene i, when Hamlet and Laertes fight in the graveyard.


Question 3(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Which statement best characterizes the relationship between Hamlet and Horatio in the play Hamlet?

 Hamlet distrusts Horatio and is nearly always suspicious of his motivations.

 Hamlet's obsessive self-reflection is a constant cause of concern for Horatio.

 Horatio is the only person in whom Hamlet feels he can confide his secrets.

 Horatio's almost comic superficiality is a source of constant annoyance to Hamlet.

 Horatio's desire for status disgusts and frustrates Hamlet throughout the play.


Question 4(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Which statement best characterizes the contrasting characters of Hamlet and Laertes in the play Hamlet?

 Hamlet and Laertes both share a common desire for power and approach it similarly.

 Hamlet and Laertes both share a common goal of revenge but approach it differently.

 Laertes is driven by a desire for justice, while Hamlet is driven by a desire for status.

 Laertes is the only person with whom Hamlet shares his deepest secrets and plans.

 Laertes's lighthearted easiness is contrasted with Hamlet's brooding introspection.


Question 5(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


The following excerpt comes from Shakespeare's play Merchant of Venice.


SHYLOCK: I am not bound to please thee with my answers.


BASSANIO: all men kill the things they do not love?


SHYLOCK: Hates any man the thing he would not kill?


BASSANIO: Every offence is not a hate at first.


This excerpt features an example of

 allusion

 hyperbole

 metaphor

 paradox

 stichomythia


Question 6(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Which statement best describes Hamlet's external conflict in the play?

 Hamlet determines to exact revenge against his father's murderer.

 Hamlet desires universal power through whatever means necessary.

 Hamlet struggles with his simultaneous fears of death and life.

 Hamlet wants the throne to be transferred to his mother rather than his uncle.

 Hamlet wishes to strengthen his ambiguous relationship with Ophelia.


Question 7(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


The play Hamlet opens up with the apparition of a ghost. The plot centers around a suspected crime with no witnesses. Hamlet is ambiguous in his relationship with Ophelia. He also spends much of the play questioning whether it's better to live or die, or to seek revenge or not. Collectively, these details of the play establish a pattern. Which statement best summarizes this pattern?

 Appearances are almost always deceiving.

 Death and decay are an unpleasant part of life.

 Few people in life can be fully trusted.

 Sometimes vengeance can be justified.

 True certainty is nearly impossible to achieve.


Question 8(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Read the following excerpt from Hamlet before you choose your answer.


MARCELLUS: Is it not like the King?


HORATIO: As thou art to thyself.

Such was the very armor he had on

When he the ambitious Norway combated.

(5) So frowned he once when, in an angry parle,

He smote the sledded Polacks on the ice.

'Tis strange.


MARCELLUS: Thus twice before, and jump at this dead hour,

With martial stalk hath he gone by our watch.


(10) HORATIO: In what particular thought to work I know not,

But in the gross and scope of mine opinion

This bodes some strange eruption to our state.


MARCELLUS: Good now, sit down, and tell me, he that knows,

Why this same strict and most observant watch

(15) So nightly toils the subject of the land,

And why such daily cast of brazen cannon

And foreign mart for implements of war,

Why such impress of shipwrights, whose sore task

Does not divide the Sunday from the week.

(20) What might be toward that this sweaty haste

Doth make the night joint laborer with the day?

Who is 't that can inform me?


Which statement best describes the event depicted in the passage?

 The watchmen are arguing over whether or not the king was murdered.

 The watchmen are debating the rumors about the king's marriage to Gertrude.

 The watchmen are discussing whether or not the king is virtuous.

 The watchmen have just learned of Hamlet's plan to overthrow Claudius.

 The watchmen have seen a ghost that resembles the recently deceased king.


Question 9(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Read the following excerpt from Hamlet before you choose your answer.


MARCELLUS: Is it not like the King?


HORATIO: As thou art to thyself.

Such was the very armor he had on

When he the ambitious Norway combated.

(5) So frowned he once when, in an angry parle,

He smote the sledded Polacks on the ice.

'Tis strange.


MARCELLUS: Thus twice before, and jump at this dead hour,

With martial stalk hath he gone by our watch.


(10) HORATIO: In what particular thought to work I know not,

But in the gross and scope of mine opinion

This bodes some strange eruption to our state.


MARCELLUS: Good now, sit down, and tell me, he that knows,

Why this same strict and most observant watch

(15) So nightly toils the subject of the land,

And why such daily cast of brazen cannon

And foreign mart for implements of war,

Why such impress of shipwrights, whose sore task

Does not divide the Sunday from the week.

(20) What might be toward that this sweaty haste

Doth make the night joint laborer with the day?

Who is 't that can inform me?


Which of the following questions best summarizes the question posed by Marcellus in lines 12-20?

 What evidence do they have for the accusation of the king's murder?

 What is the reason for the king's plans to soon go to war?

 Who can tell me whether the ghost is a real apparition or an illusion?

 Why have we been asked to stand watch so late and for so long?

 Why have we recently been preparing so much military weaponry?


Question 10(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Read the following excerpt from Hamlet before you choose your answer.


MARCELLUS: Is it not like the King?


HORATIO: As thou art to thyself.

Such was the very armor he had on

When he the ambitious Norway combated.

(5) So frowned he once when, in an angry parle,

He smote the sledded Polacks on the ice.

'Tis strange.


MARCELLUS: Thus twice before, and jump at this dead hour,

With martial stalk hath he gone by our watch.


(10) HORATIO: In what particular thought to work I know not,

But in the gross and scope of mine opinion

This bodes some strange eruption to our state.


MARCELLUS: Good now, sit down, and tell me, he that knows,

Why this same strict and most observant watch

(15) So nightly toils the subject of the land,

And why such daily cast of brazen cannon

And foreign mart for implements of war,

Why such impress of shipwrights, whose sore task

Does not divide the Sunday from the week.

(20) What might be toward that this sweaty haste

Doth make the night joint laborer with the day?

Who is 't that can inform me?


Lines 11-12 are best interpreted to mean that

 Claudius should not be king but Hamlet had no desire to rule

 Denmark is about to experience a natural disaster

 the appearance of the ghost is an ominous prophecy for Denmark

 the ghost's appearance is particularly gruesome and repulsive

 the king was murdered in a very suspicious and dubious manner


Question 11(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Read the following excerpt before you choose your answer.


HAMLET: O that this too too solid flesh would melt,

Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew!

Or that the Everlasting had not fix'd

His canon 'gainst self-slaughter! O God! O God!

(5) How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable

Seem to me all the uses of this world!

Fie on't! O fie! 'tis an unweeded garden,

That grows to seed; things rank and gross in nature

Possess it merely. That it should come to this!

(10) But two months dead!—nay, not so much, not two:

So excellent a king; that was, to this,

Hyperion to a satyr; so loving to my mother,

That he might not beteem the winds of heaven

Visit her face too roughly. Heaven and earth!

(15) Must I remember? Why, she would hang on him

As if increase of appetite had grown

By what it fed on: and yet, within a month,—

Let me not think on't,—Frailty, thy name is woman!—

A little month; or ere those shoes were old

(20) With which she followed my poor father's body

Like Niobe, all tears;—why she, even she,—

O God! a beast that wants discourse of reason,

Would have mourn'd longer,—married with mine uncle,

My father's brother; but no more like my father

(25) Than I to Hercules: within a month;

Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears

Had left the flushing in her galled eyes,

She married:—O, most wicked speed, to post

With such dexterity to incestuous sheets!

(30) It is not, nor it cannot come to good;

But break my heart,—for I must hold my tongue.


Which statement best describes the context for this soliloquy in Act I, scene ii?

 Hamlet's parents have just requested that he not return to school and that he stop being so melancholy.

 Hamlet has just learned with certainty that Claudius murdered his father and then married his mother.

 Hamlet has just shared his complex and clever plan to trap Claudius into confession with Horatio.

 Ophelia has just broken up with Hamlet unexpectedly, and he is brooding and melancholy.

 The palace guards have just notified Hamlet of the ghostly apparition they witnessed in the night.


Question 12(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Read the following excerpt before you choose your answer.


HAMLET: O that this too too solid flesh would melt,

Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew!

Or that the Everlasting had not fix'd

His canon 'gainst self-slaughter! O God! O God!

(5) How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable

Seem to me all the uses of this world!

Fie on't! O fie! 'tis an unweeded garden,

That grows to seed; things rank and gross in nature

Possess it merely. That it should come to this!

(10) But two months dead!—nay, not so much, not two:

So excellent a king; that was, to this,

Hyperion to a satyr; so loving to my mother,

That he might not beteem the winds of heaven

Visit her face too roughly. Heaven and earth!

(15) Must I remember? Why, she would hang on him

As if increase of appetite had grown

By what it fed on: and yet, within a month,—

Let me not think on't,—Frailty, thy name is woman!—

A little month; or ere those shoes were old

(20) With which she followed my poor father's body

Like Niobe, all tears;—why she, even she,—

O God! a beast that wants discourse of reason,

Would have mourn'd longer,—married with mine uncle,

My father's brother; but no more like my father

(25) Than I to Hercules: within a month;

Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears

Had left the flushing in her galled eyes,

She married:—O, most wicked speed, to post

With such dexterity to incestuous sheets!

(30) It is not, nor it cannot come to good;

But break my heart,—for I must hold my tongue.


Which statement best summarizes the meaning of lines 1-4?

 Hamlet finds solace in religion after losing his father.

 Hamlet prays to God to avenge his father's death for him.

 Hamlet swears that he will avenge his father's death or end his life.

 Hamlet vows to hatch a plan that will reveal his father's murderer.

 Hamlet wishes to end his life, but it is forbidden by religion.


Question 13(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Read the following excerpt before you choose your answer.


HAMLET: O that this too too solid flesh would melt,

Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew!

Or that the Everlasting had not fix'd

His canon 'gainst self-slaughter! O God! O God!

(5) How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable

Seem to me all the uses of this world!

Fie on't! O fie! 'tis an unweeded garden,

That grows to seed; things rank and gross in nature

Possess it merely. That it should come to this!

(10) But two months dead!—nay, not so much, not two:

So excellent a king; that was, to this,

Hyperion to a satyr; so loving to my mother,

That he might not beteem the winds of heaven

Visit her face too roughly. Heaven and earth!

(15) Must I remember? Why, she would hang on him

As if increase of appetite had grown

By what it fed on: and yet, within a month,—

Let me not think on't,—Frailty, thy name is woman!—

A little month; or ere those shoes were old

(20) With which she followed my poor father's body

Like Niobe, all tears;—why she, even she,—

O God! a beast that wants discourse of reason,

Would have mourn'd longer,—married with mine uncle,

My father's brother; but no more like my father

(25) Than I to Hercules: within a month;

Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears

Had left the flushing in her galled eyes,

She married:—O, most wicked speed, to post

With such dexterity to incestuous sheets!

(30) It is not, nor it cannot come to good;

But break my heart,—for I must hold my tongue.


Line 19 ("A little month...were old") is best interpreted to mean

 Claudius and Hamlet's mother were married too soon after his father's death

 Claudius is too old to have married Hamlet's still young, vibrant mother

 Gertrude is denied the finer things in life now that she has married Claudius

 it is odd that Gertrude would have worn such old shoes to her wedding

 one month has passed since Hamlet returned to his family in Denmark


Question 14(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Read the following excerpt before you choose your answer.


HAMLET: O that this too too solid flesh would melt,

Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew!

Or that the Everlasting had not fix'd

His canon 'gainst self-slaughter! O God! O God!

(5) How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable

Seem to me all the uses of this world!

Fie on't! O fie! 'tis an unweeded garden,

That grows to seed; things rank and gross in nature

Possess it merely. That it should come to this!

(10) But two months dead!—nay, not so much, not two:

So excellent a king; that was, to this,

Hyperion to a satyr; so loving to my mother,

That he might not beteem the winds of heaven

Visit her face too roughly. Heaven and earth!

(15) Must I remember? Why, she would hang on him

As if increase of appetite had grown

By what it fed on: and yet, within a month,—

Let me not think on't,—Frailty, thy name is woman!—

A little month; or ere those shoes were old

(20) With which she followed my poor father's body

Like Niobe, all tears;—why she, even she,—

O God! a beast that wants discourse of reason,

Would have mourn'd longer,—married with mine uncle,

My father's brother; but no more like my father

(25) Than I to Hercules: within a month;

Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears

Had left the flushing in her galled eyes,

She married:—O, most wicked speed, to post

With such dexterity to incestuous sheets!

(30) It is not, nor it cannot come to good;

But break my heart,—for I must hold my tongue.


The use of the word "dexterity" in line 29 suggests that Hamlet's mother

 had more love for Claudius than his father

 had strategic motives for marrying Claudius

 is too virtuous to have married Claudius

 was forced to marry Claudius against her will

 was part of the plot to kill Hamlet's father


Question 15(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Read the following excerpt before you choose your answer.


HAMLET: O that this too too solid flesh would melt,

Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew!

Or that the Everlasting had not fix'd

His canon 'gainst self-slaughter! O God! O God!

(5) How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable

Seem to me all the uses of this world!

Fie on't! O fie! 'tis an unweeded garden,

That grows to seed; things rank and gross in nature

Possess it merely. That it should come to this!

(10) But two months dead!—nay, not so much, not two:

So excellent a king; that was, to this,

Hyperion to a satyr; so loving to my mother,

That he might not beteem the winds of heaven

Visit her face too roughly. Heaven and earth!

(15) Must I remember? Why, she would hang on him

As if increase of appetite had grown

By what it fed on: and yet, within a month,—

Let me not think on't,—Frailty, thy name is woman!—

A little month; or ere those shoes were old

(20) With which she followed my poor father's body

Like Niobe, all tears;—why she, even she,—

O God! a beast that wants discourse of reason,

Would have mourn'd longer,—married with mine uncle,

My father's brother; but no more like my father

(25) Than I to Hercules: within a month;

Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears

Had left the flushing in her galled eyes,

She married:—O, most wicked speed, to post

With such dexterity to incestuous sheets!

(30) It is not, nor it cannot come to good;

But break my heart,—for I must hold my tongue.


Lines 30-31 ("It is not... my tongue") are best interpreted to mean

 Hamlet believes that the marriage of Gertrude and Claudius will eventually fail

 Hamlet knows the marriage is bad for Denmark but feels unable to say anything

 Hamlet is certain that Claudius has killed his father but is unable to prove it

 Hamlet's heart is broken after being betrayed by his mother and Claudius

 Hamlet's suspicions of murder have been aroused, but he must confirm them


Question 16(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Read the following excerpt before you choose your answer.


HAMLET: [taking the skull] Let me see. Alas, poor

Yorick! I knew him, Horatio—a fellow of infinite

jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath bore me on his

back a thousand times, and now how abhorred in

(5) my imagination it is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung

those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft.

Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your

songs? your flashes of merriment that were wont to

set the table on a roar? Not one now to mock your

(10) own grinning? Quite chapfallen? Now get you to my

lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch

thick, to this favor she must come. Make her laugh

at that.—Prithee, Horatio, tell me one thing.


HORATIO: What's that, my lord?


(15) HAMLET: Dost thou think Alexander looked o' this

fashion i' th' earth?


HORATIO: E'en so.


HAMLET: And smelt so? Pah!


HORATIO: E'en so, my lord.


(20) HAMLET: To what base uses we may return, Horatio!

Why may not imagination trace the noble dust of

Alexander till he find it stopping a bunghole?


HORATIO: 'Twere to consider too curiously to consider

so.


(25) HAMLET: No, faith, not a jot; but to follow him thither,

with modesty enough and likelihood to lead it, as

thus: Alexander died, Alexander was buried, Alexander

returneth to dust; the dust is earth; of earth

we make loam; and why of that loam whereto he

(30) was converted might they not stop a beer barrel?

Imperious Caesar, dead and turned to clay,

Might stop a hole to keep the wind away.

O, that that earth which kept the world in awe

Should patch a wall t' expel the winter's flaw!


The passage as a whole reflects

 Hamlet's belief that we are unequal in death

 Hamlet's developing madness and thirst for revenge

 Hamlet's prediction of his own impending death

 the play's cautionary message about appearances

 the play's overall theme of death and decay


Question 17(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Read the following excerpt before you choose your answer.


HAMLET: [taking the skull] Let me see. Alas, poor

Yorick! I knew him, Horatio—a fellow of infinite

jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath bore me on his

back a thousand times, and now how abhorred in

(5) my imagination it is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung

those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft.

Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your

songs? your flashes of merriment that were wont to

set the table on a roar? Not one now to mock your

(10) own grinning? Quite chapfallen? Now get you to my

lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch

thick, to this favor she must come. Make her laugh

at that.—Prithee, Horatio, tell me one thing.


HORATIO: What's that, my lord?


(15) HAMLET: Dost thou think Alexander looked o' this

fashion i' th' earth?


HORATIO: E'en so.


HAMLET: And smelt so? Pah!


HORATIO: E'en so, my lord.


(20) HAMLET: To what base uses we may return, Horatio!

Why may not imagination trace the noble dust of

Alexander till he find it stopping a bunghole?


HORATIO: 'Twere to consider too curiously to consider

so.


(25) HAMLET: No, faith, not a jot; but to follow him thither,

with modesty enough and likelihood to lead it, as

thus: Alexander died, Alexander was buried, Alexander

returneth to dust; the dust is earth; of earth

we make loam; and why of that loam whereto he

(30) was converted might they not stop a beer barrel?

Imperious Caesar, dead and turned to clay,

Might stop a hole to keep the wind away.

O, that that earth which kept the world in awe

Should patch a wall t' expel the winter's flaw!


Which statement best describes the meaning of the allusions used by Hamlet in lines 27-32 ("Alexander died... the wind away.")?

 All humans, even those who reach a level of greatness, die equally.

 It is a tragedy when men of greatness die prematurely and without honor.

 Men of greatness are worthy of the highest regard in death.

 The death of great humans is very different from that of ordinary men.

 The violence of death is one that all men of humble means must face.


Question 18(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Read the following excerpt before you choose your answer.


HAMLET: [taking the skull] Let me see. Alas, poor

Yorick! I knew him, Horatio—a fellow of infinite

jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath bore me on his

back a thousand times, and now how abhorred in

(5) my imagination it is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung

those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft.

Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your

songs? your flashes of merriment that were wont to

set the table on a roar? Not one now to mock your

(10) own grinning? Quite chapfallen? Now get you to my

lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch

thick, to this favor she must come. Make her laugh

at that.—Prithee, Horatio, tell me one thing.


HORATIO: What's that, my lord?


(15) HAMLET: Dost thou think Alexander looked o' this

fashion i' th' earth?


HORATIO: E'en so.


HAMLET: And smelt so? Pah!


HORATIO: E'en so, my lord.


(20) HAMLET: To what base uses we may return, Horatio!

Why may not imagination trace the noble dust of

Alexander till he find it stopping a bunghole?


HORATIO: 'Twere to consider too curiously to consider

so.


(25) HAMLET: No, faith, not a jot; but to follow him thither,

with modesty enough and likelihood to lead it, as

thus: Alexander died, Alexander was buried, Alexander

returneth to dust; the dust is earth; of earth

we make loam; and why of that loam whereto he

(30) was converted might they not stop a beer barrel?

Imperious Caesar, dead and turned to clay,

Might stop a hole to keep the wind away.

O, that that earth which kept the world in awe

Should patch a wall t' expel the winter's flaw!


Based on Hamlet's statements in lines 1-10, Yorick was

 a close friend of the family

 a jester to the court

 a king from another land

 a member of the family

 an enemy of the family


Question 19(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Read the following excerpt before you choose your answer.


HAMLET: [taking the skull] Let me see. Alas, poor

Yorick! I knew him, Horatio—a fellow of infinite

jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath bore me on his

back a thousand times, and now how abhorred in

(5) my imagination it is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung

those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft.

Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your

songs? your flashes of merriment that were wont to

set the table on a roar? Not one now to mock your

(10) own grinning? Quite chapfallen? Now get you to my

lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch

thick, to this favor she must come. Make her laugh

at that.—Prithee, Horatio, tell me one thing.


HORATIO: What's that, my lord?


(15) HAMLET: Dost thou think Alexander looked o' this

fashion i' th' earth?


HORATIO: E'en so.


HAMLET: And smelt so? Pah!


HORATIO: E'en so, my lord.


(20) HAMLET: To what base uses we may return, Horatio!

Why may not imagination trace the noble dust of

Alexander till he find it stopping a bunghole?


HORATIO: 'Twere to consider too curiously to consider

so.


(25) HAMLET: No, faith, not a jot; but to follow him thither,

with modesty enough and likelihood to lead it, as

thus: Alexander died, Alexander was buried, Alexander

returneth to dust; the dust is earth; of earth

we make loam; and why of that loam whereto he

(30) was converted might they not stop a beer barrel?

Imperious Caesar, dead and turned to clay,

Might stop a hole to keep the wind away.

O, that that earth which kept the world in awe

Should patch a wall t' expel the winter's flaw!


Which statement best summarizes the significance of the excerpt?

 Hamlet concocts his plan to reveal his father's murderer.

 Hamlet contemplates the inevitability of death for all.

 Hamlet determines to avenge the death of his father.

 Hamlet hears confirmation that his father was murdered.

 Hamlet predicts a violent and untimely death for himself.


Question 20(Multiple Choice Worth 2 points)

(06.03 MC)


Read the following excerpt before you choose your answer.


HAMLET: [taking the skull] Let me see. Alas, poor

Yorick! I knew him, Horatio—a fellow of infinite

jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath bore me on his

back a thousand times, and now how abhorred in

(5) my imagination it is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung

those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft.

Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your

songs? your flashes of merriment that were wont to

set the table on a roar? Not one now to mock your

(10) own grinning? Quite chapfallen? Now get you to my

lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch

thick, to this favor she must come. Make her laugh

at that.—Prithee, Horatio, tell me one thing.


HORATIO: What's that, my lord?


(15) HAMLET: Dost thou think Alexander looked o' this

fashion i' th' earth?


HORATIO: E'en so.


HAMLET: And smelt so? Pah!


HORATIO: E'en so, my lord.


(20) HAMLET: To what base uses we may return, Horatio!

Why may not imagination trace the noble dust of

Alexander till he find it stopping a bunghole?


HORATIO: 'Twere to consider too curiously to consider

so.


(25) HAMLET: No, faith, not a jot; but to follow him thither,

with modesty enough and likelihood to lead it, as

thus: Alexander died, Alexander was buried, Alexander

returneth to dust; the dust is earth; of earth

we make loam; and why of that loam whereto he

(30) was converted might they not stop a beer barrel?

Imperious Caesar, dead and turned to clay,

Might stop a hole to keep the wind away.

O, that that earth which kept the world in awe

Should patch a wall t' expel the winter's flaw!


In context, the word "fancy" (line 3) is best interpreted to mean

 beloved

 honors

 imagination

 wealthy

 well-dressed

Answer & Explanation
Verified Solved by verified expert
<p>nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam</p> Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet

Unlock full access to Course Hero

Explore over 16 million step-by-step answers from our library

Subscribe to view answer

ac magna. Fu

dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consec

or nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur l

risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lec

nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus

a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, congu

entesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusc

m risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce du

usce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ip

or nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficit

a. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet.

cing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec fac

ur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac m

ctum vitae odio. Donec al

ipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellent

et, consect

Step-by-step explanation

or nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, cong

Student reviews
54% (13 ratings)
Other answer
<p>ia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur ad</p> Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet

Unlock full access to Course Hero

Explore over 16 million step-by-step answers from our library

Subscribe to view answer

eet

sum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvina

e vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet

sum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor

a. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Do

sum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvi

dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulv

icitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie consequat, ultri

a. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. L

or nec facilisis. Pellentesque dapibus efficitur l

ongue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit am

fficitur laoreet. Nam risus ante, dapibus a mol

onec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

ng elit. Nam lacinia pulv

ctum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

m risus ante, d

gue

Step-by-step explanation

ultrices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, c

19826601

trices ac magna. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Donec aliquet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. Pellentesqu
1 Attachment
IMG_20210601_044208.png
png