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chapter 11 . Marcus Carlsson/Johnr Images/Corbis Forms of Poetry "Breathe-in experience, breathe-out poetry." Muriel Rukeyser, American Jewish poet,...

Reading Responses to a Poem

Read the poem "A Morning Song" from this week’s assigned readings, and identify at least three elements in the poem that you found interesting or engaging (e.g., form, language, content, and/or other literary elements).

Then, assess how these elements affected your response to the poem, in its entirety.

(e.g., Did these elements affect your opinions on (or reaction to) the content of the poem? Did they cause you to focus on one aspect of the poem over others?)

Assignment Requirements
•Length: Your paper should be two to four double-spaced pages in length (excluding title and reference page)
•Sources: Support your reflections with textual details and analysis from at least two scholarly sources.
•APA: Your draft must be formatted to APA (6th edition) style. ◦Separate Title Page: Must include an original title
◦Separate Reference Page
◦Proper Citations: All sources must be properly cited, both within the text and in a separate reference page.

•Elements of Academic Writing: All academic papers should include these elements. ◦Introduction with a thesis statement
◦Supporting paragraphs
◦Conclusion

Attached is the poem in section 11.5 of the PDF and the YouTube video to watch on the poem
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oa-mWuBY-is

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CHAPTER 11 Section 11.1 Narrative Poetry William Wordsworth’s observation that poetry is “the imagi- native expression of strong feelings, usually rhythmic” implies that poetry is likely to be written in numerous ways. Over time, the conventions of narrative poetry and lyric poetry have become most popular; speciFc forms of narrative and lyric poetry are recognized across the world’s cultures and used by poets globally. 11.1 Narratve PoeTry N arratve poeTry Tells a sTory. ITs grandesT form, and perhaps The oldesT, is The epic , a sTory abouT momenTous occurrences ThaT have universal signiFcance. ±he Greek epics The Iliad and The Odyssey, for example, Trace ±rojan War evenTs and Ulysses’s long journey home a²er The war. John MilTon’s epic Paradise Lost is a lo²y sTory abouT The fall of humankind from an Edenic exisTence inTo a world of su³ering. AnoTher form of narratve poeTry is The ballad , a sTory ThaT’s sung. In ancienT oral Traditons, bal- lads were used To celebraTe shared experiences involving advenTure, war, love, deaTh, and The supernaTural. Ballads stll incorporaTe These Themes and porTray siTuatons in which violence and beTrayal occur. John KeaTs’s “La Belle Dame sans Merci,” wri´en in The 19Th cenTury, is a liTerary ballad, noT inTended To be sung. IT is pa´erned a²er earlier popular ballads. ±ypically, The person feaTured in a ballad, as in This case, is an advenTurer, a romantc Fgure. BuT The sTory here is being Told a²er a partcular advenTure has Taken iTs Toll. ±he knighT-aT-arms is looking pale, haggard, and woebegone. In True ballad sTyle, The sTory is Told wiThouT background or much deTail; The empha- sis is on The acton in a human dilemma, iTs ouTcome, and The feelings iT produces. La Belle Dame sans Merci John Keats (1819) O whaT can ail Thee, knighT-aT-arms, So lone and palely loiTering? ±he sedge has wiTher’d from The lake, And no birds sing. O whaT can ail Thee, knighT-aT-arms! So haggard and so woe-begone? ±he squirrel’s granary is full, And The harvesT’s done. I see a lily on Thy brow WiTh anguish moisT and fever dew, And on Thy cheeks a fading rose µasT wiThereTh Too. KnighT-aT-arms : medieval ideal of manhood Sedge : grasslike plant Having described the knight’s down- trodden condiTon, the storyteller proceeds to give an explanaTon in the knight’s words. 5 ±he ballad’s typical themes of romance and love are central in Keat’s ballad. 10
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