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Week 3 Key Concept Exercise

Master in Marketing

Module: Data driven Marketing research

and analysis

Subject The questionnaire

Qualitative and quantitative research methods both have their place and purpose. Sometimes they are mixed. Each has its own tools, methods and protocols that make it suitable and valuable for particular marketing research projects.

The questionnaire is a valuable quantitative tool for the marketing researcher. Most of us have taken a questionnaire at some point. There are questionnaires of all types. Some are short – just a few simple questions – while others can be many pages long. Some are very complex and detailed, while others are more open-ended.

In this week’s assignment, you will analyse questions compiled from various questionnaires and improve them as you see fit. You will then share your edited questions on the Collaboration Forum.

To prepare for this assignment:

  • Read the Required Learning Resources (please find below references).
  • Refer to the attached Worksheets.
  • Reflect on your own experience taking and/or creating questionnaires. How would you describe or characterise the experience(s)?
  • Analyse the elements of an effective questionnaire.
  • Examine the seven stages of questionnaire development.

in an approximately 500-word response, address the following issues/questions:

  • Analyse the questions in the Week 3 Key Concept assignment Worksheet. For each one, identify what you regard are the errors in the question (and the answer choices as applicable), and propose an alternative(s).

Be sure to read over your Key Concept Exercise before submitting your work. Make sure the spelling and grammar are correct and the language, citing and referencing you use when providing your opinion are appropriate for academic writing.

Important note:

Plagiarism Should not exceed 5%, or work will be rejected,

Please Stick to the below references only use the below references.

Learning Resources

Wilson, A.M. (2011) Marketing research: an integrated approach. 3rd ed. [Electronic Book]. Harlow: Financial Times/Prentice Hall.

· Chapter 6, ‘Collecting quantitative data’ (pp.129-152)

· Chapter 7, ‘Designing questionnaires’ (pp.153-179)

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De Bruijne, M. & Wijnant, A. (2014) ‘Improving response rates and questionnaire design for mobile web surveys’, Public Opinion Quarterly,78 (4), pp.951-962.

Use the University of Liverpool Online Library to find this article.

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Kim, Y. (2011) ‘The pilot study in qualitative inquiry: Identifying issues and learning lessons for culturally competent research’, Qualitative Social Work,10 (2), pp.190-206.

Use the University of Liverpool Online Library to find this article.

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Leung, W.-C. (2001) ‘How to design a questionnaire’, Student BMJ,9, p.187.

Use the University of Liverpool Online Library to find this article.

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Rezaeian, M. (2014) ‘Professor Mohsen’s academic advice series: how to design a questionnaire in the area of research: Introducing a ten-item checklist’, Middle East Journal of Business,9 (1), p.55.

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Robertshaw, G. (2007) ‘Epistemological limitations in quantitative marketing research: implications for empirical generalisations’, Journal of Empirical Generalisations in Marketing Science,11 (2), pp.1-13.

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Smith, T.A. (2014) ‘Testing theory and related factors for influencing proficiency in quantitative research’, Academy of Educational Leadership Journal,18 (4), pp.117-128.

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Document: Week 3 Key Concept Exercise Worksheet (Word Document) please find attached file

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KMGT 714 – Data Driven Marketing Research and Analysis Week 3 - Key Concept Exercise Worksheet Analyse the following 10 questions. For each one, identify what you regard are the errors in the question (and the answer choices as applicable), and propose an alternative(s). 1. How do you rate this module? 1. Satisfactory 2. Good 3. Very good 2. Do you like fruits and vegetables? Yes/No 3. Undertaking Quantitative research is difficult because: 1. I lack an understanding of statistical methods. 2. I prefer qualitative research. 3. It requires a structured approach. 4. It is not always appropriate to certain research problems. 4. In your opinion, how would you rate the speed and accuracy of your work? 1. OK 2. Good 3. Very good 4. Excellent 5. What is your age? 1. 0–10 2. 10–20 3. 20–30 4. 30–40 5. 40+ 6. How many times do you shop online each month? 7. Please answer the following questions: 1. What is your ethnic background ?_____________________________________ 2. What is your age?_________________________________________________ 3. Which political party did you vote for in the last election?___________________ 4. What are your religious beliefs?_______________________________________ 5. What is your annual household income?________________________________ 8. What is the fastest and most economical way for you to get to work? 9. Now that you've seen how this device can save you time and money, would you buy our product? 10. In the past year since we launched our promotional campaign, we have also increased visibility in supermarkets, lowered prices and introduced more environmentally friendly packaging. Tell us about your reaction to these. © 2015 Laureate EducaTon, Inc. Page 1 of
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© 2015 Laureate Education, Inc. Page 0 of 6 Management School Introduction to Quantitative Techniques in Market Research and the Questionnaire KMGT 714 Data Driven Marketing Research and Analysis Week 3 Key Concept Overview
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© 2015 Laureate Education, Inc. Page 1 of 6 Key Concept Introduction to Quantitative Techniques in Market Research and the Questionnaire If you recall from Week 1, Coca-Cola made a huge and costly mistake when it attempted to replace traditional Coke with New Coke. The company had conducted 200,000 taste tests and these tests indicated that 60% of consumers preferred the New Coke to the older version (Kotler and Armstrong, 2004). Additionally, 52% of consumers preferred New Coke to Pepsi, Coca-Cola’s rival (Kotler and Armstrong, 2004). Coke had spent more than $4 million in a 2-year period carrying out this research. New Coke attracted only 2% of the soft drinks market, much less than anticipated. You will also recall that due to the failure of this new drink, Coke decided to withdraw it from the market. Today, Coke enjoys roughly 17% of the soft drinks market in the US. As you can see, the launch of New Coke and the results of that launch have been discussed and analysed in a quantifiable manner. A sample size was determined that would be representative of the population of soft drink consumers; results of the taste tests were expressed in numbers that represented the preferences of the participants in the taste tests; and the consequences of launching New Coke were quantified. Quantitative research is a method of enquiry about a phenomenon that is carried out in a structured manner. It relies on the collection of quantitative data to produce quantifiable results (or statistics) that can be used to inform marketing decisions. Quantitative research methods employ samples that are generally larger than those used in qualitative research. These samples are chosen to be representative of the general population of interest. The quantitative data collected from these samples can then be used to make inferences about the population of interest. Aliaga and Gunderson (2003) define quantitative research as: ‘Explaining phenomena by collecting numerical data that are analysed using mathematically based methods (in particular statistics)’. Types of market research to which quantitative research may be better suited Just as there are certain contexts where qualitative research is more appropriate, quantitative research also lends itself to certain enquiries. It may seem obvious, but some questions require a numerical answer. For example, Coca-Cola wanted to quantify the response to New Coke. The taste tests revealed that 60% of customers favoured the New Coke over the older version; 40% either did not like it or expressed no preference. Similarly, marketing researchers may need to be able to quantify the likelihood of a marketing campaign’s success. Qualitative research may provide deeper insights into a phenomenon, but it will not provide quantitative results. Quantitative data can also be used for predictive reasons. Marketing researchers may want to quantify what will happen if prices change, market shares fall or populations age. Again, the result of these changes can be quantified and their impact measured. Importantly, quantitative research methods can also be used to measure trends. This is particularly important when it comes to longitudinal studies and the study of phenomenon over a period of time. Finally, quantitative research methods can be used for testing hypotheses. Those involved in marketing research might want to find out what the relationships are between variables and test the relationship
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