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Objective The objective of the Course Project is to give you an opportunity to practice the skills learned in class regarding the planning...

I need help with a course project for a project management class. I have attached some documents that explain the requirements for the project. Also, this project is something that I will need help with for the next 6 weeks. I am willing to pay for each week. Thank you for your help. Also, I am not working in a group so please disregard any statement that calls for group participation

Cource project.docx

Objective
The objective of the Course Project is to give you an opportunity to practice the skills learned in class regarding the
planning methodologies of a project. These skills are directly applicable toward your senior project.
Guidelines
For this project you may choose one that is of interest to you or you may choose to begin planning for your senior
project. When selecting a project, avoid picking one that is either too big or too small. For example, do not decide to
build a new stadium for your local sports team (too big) or to plant your summer garden (too small).
Here are some successful project ideas.
• The opening of a coffee shop
• An open house for a local social service agency
• A meditation pool and platform • A redevelopment of a local playground • Design and installation of a computer network for a small business
• Software development project
A project to build a house is NOT acceptable.
Milestones






• Due Week 2: Project Charter
Due Week 3: Scope Statement
Due Week 4: Work Breakdown Structure and Network Diagram
Due Week 5: Risk Management Plan
Due Week 6: Resource Management Plan
Due Week 7: Communication Plan
Due Week 8: Final Project Package Deliverables
Due Week 2: Project Charter
Provide a project charter of your selected project in accordance with the charter template found in Doc Sharing. The
project will be the project your team will use for the remainder of this course.
For your new project, please develop a project team (citing names, e-mail addresses, and telephone numbers).
Be certain to include the following. 1.
2.
3.
4. Project Objectives
Project Statement of Work
Milestones All other sections as required in the project charter
Please put this in proper business writing format. Consider me to be your boss.
If working in a group, include a statement of participation, describing how each person contributed to this project
deliverable. Please have each person sign the statement.
Deliverables:

Project charter (in MS Word)

If working in a group, include a statement of participation, describing how each person
contributed to this project deliverable. Please have each person sign the statement. Due Week 3: Scope Statement
Prepare a scope statement using either the model on pages 144-145 in the text as a template or the scope template in
Doc Sharing. Remember to be tangible, measurable, and specific. Be sure to include all sections required in the
Practitioner section of the Week 2 Lecture.
Deliverables:

Project scope statement (in MS Word)

If working in a group, include a statement of participation, describing how each person
contributed to this project deliverable. Please have each person sign the statement.
Due Week 4: Work Breakdown Structure and Network Diagram
According to the PMBOK® Guide, "the WBS is a deliverable-oriented hierarchical decomposition of the work to be
executed by the project team, to accomplish the project objectives and create the required deliverables." In other
words, it lists the project's tasks, the subtasks, the sub-subtasks, and so on.
For this phase, you will create a work breakdown structure (WBS) for the project you selected during phase one.
Remember that the WBS starts with your major deliverables (that you stated in your scope management plan) at the
highest level. The lower levels have the tasks required to complete those deliverables. You should have at least three
tasks under each deliverable, but you may have as many tasks as needed to ensure that the deliverables are complete.
Review the textbook (and the PMBOK® Guide, if you have it) for some suggestions on how best to create a WBS.
From your work breakdown structure, develop a project task list with dependencies, add durations, and then submit
a network diagram (using MS Project) and a project schedule.
Develop the Work Breakdown Structure

Your WBS should have a minimum of 25–30 tasks and be three subtasks deep.

Make sure to use verb-object task names (for example, "Develop software").
o
Enter tasks in MS Project.
o Create the predecessor relationships to create a network diagram. o
DO NOT LINK SUMMARY TASKS!
o
In the Gantt Chart Tools tab, check the box marked Outline Number in the
Show/Hide group.
Deliverables:
• In MS Project, print the following.
o
Gantt Chart Entry Table on no more than three pages [View > Tables > Entry] Include Task Name, Duration, Start, Finish, and Predecessor columns
with Gantt Chart.
o
Schedule Table on one page [View > Tables > Schedule] Include only the default columns (Task Mode, Task Name, Start,
Finish, Late Start, Late Finish, Free Slack, Total Slack) and do not include the
Gantt Chart. Make sure that all columns are wide enough to read completely.
o
Network Diagram on one page [Task tab > View group > Network Diagram] Highlight Critical Path and Circle Milestones. Justify why you chose your milestones. (Hint: use milestones from the
scope statement or look for key merge or burst activities.) Also print out the network diagram on two to three pages so that task
information can be read.
o
Using the Resource Sheet (View > Resource Sheet), develop and print a list of
resources required for your project. Include Max.Units and Costs (Std. Rate, Ovt. Rate,
Cost/Use).

If working in a group, include a statement of participation, describing how each person
contributed to this project deliverable. Please have each person sign the statement.
DO NOT ASSIGN RESOURCES AT THIS TIME! Due Week 5: Risk Management Plan
1. Establish the project's priority matrix (constrain, enhance, accept). 2. Identify a minimum of 10 project risks and when each will occur in the project life cycle, and then
3. determine their impact and probability of occurrence.
Create a matrix similar to the one from the your text (Pinto, Figure 7.5 Classifying Project Risk on
page 222), making sure that it is consistent with your priority matrix, or use the risk management
process in the Practitioner section of Week 3. 4. Justify the use of your risk scoring matrix or use the risk management process in the Practitioner
section of Week 3.
Assess your risks according to your matrix. 5.
6. Rank the risks according to their total risk score.
7. Prepare the Risk Response Matrix for each risk—Risk, Response, Contingency, Trigger,
Responsible Person—Using the Risk Management Analysis Template in doc shr
Deliverables:

Use the Risk Management Analysis Template spreadsheet (risk management analysis
template.xls) found in Doc Sharing (there is a separate tab for each portion of the risk management
plan) or use the risk management process in the Practitioner section of Week 3.

If working in a team, include a statement of participation, describing how each person
contributed to this project deliverable. Please have each person sign the statement.
Due Week 6: Resource Management Plan
A project plan cannot be considered complete until the resources have been assigned (including the bottom-up cost
estimate) and leveled, ensuring that the resources are available to complete the work.
Tasks:
1.
Assign resources to tasks. 2.
3.
4.
5. Print out the resource sheet. 6.
7.
8.
9. Level the project within available slack. 1. A journal of project activity. Describe what you did on each step, and the results of your Identify resources that are over-allocated.
Print the Gantt chart and entry table. Print reports (or tables) showing the costs of the resources and the cost by work package.
Is this an acceptable cost for your project? That is, is it within the budget proposed in the scope
statement?
Print the new entry table (do not include the Gantt chart).
Identify resources that remain over-allocated. If resources are still over allocated, clear leveling and then re-level without the slack
constraint.
10.
Identify how this has affected the project duration (the number of days and the new
completion date).
11.
Assume that no other resources are available. What will your team do to complete the
project on time? Instead of assigning overtime, add a new resource for a cost 1.5 times the normal
labor cost. What is the cost for the additional resource and the total project? Is this revised cost
within the amount developed in the scope statement? If you choose not to add a resource, your
project completion may be delayed. Is a delay in the project due date acceptable? Why or why
not? Submit supporting documentation from MS Project as needed.
Deliverables:
actions. 2. MS Project printouts (as above). Please indicate on the printouts which step they support. 3. Final time and cost results. Describe how these meet the needs as defined in the scope
statement. If your team believes that the original scope statement needs to change, describe the
changes, why the changes were necessary, and include the modified scope statement in the
deliverables. 4. Include a copy of your original (and revised, if necessary) scope statement with the
deliverables.
5.
If working in a team, include a statement of participation, describing how each person
contributed to this project deliverable. Please have each person sign the statement.
Due Week 7: Communication Plan
According to the PMBOK® Guide, "the Communications Planning process determines the information and
communications needs of the stakeholders; for example, who needs what information, when they will need it, how it
will be given to them, and by whom." In other words, it lists the general communication requirements for the
project.
This week, you will create a simple communication plan for the execution of your project. This plan should have the
following information: contact information for all affected parties, major deliverables and how progress on the
deliverables will be communicated to the affected parties (as well as who the affected parties are and when
communication will take place), and any other miscellaneous information about communication on the project (see
the Communications Plan template in Doc Sharing).
Deliverables:

Business memo summarizing the submission for the week

Communication plan
If working in a team, include a statement of participation, describing how each person contributed to this project
deliverable. Please have each person sign the statement.
Due Week 8: Final Project Package
You will need to create a project plan. This plan should be completely integrated and presented in a logical order. It
should be written professionally and should be mistake-free in terms of spelling and grammar. The final project plan
should incorporate any changes that occurred along the way, including corrections and advice given by colleagues or
your professor.
Any tables and/or graphs should be labeled correctly. Your final project plan should consist of the following items.

Table of contents
• Project charter • Scope statement • Work breakdown structure • Network diagram • Risk management plan •
• Resource management plan
Communication management plan Deliverables:
Project plan consisting of the following items

Business memo summarizing the submission for the week

Complete project plan, including the project charter

Lessons learned document (to be completed individually, even if the balance of the
project was performed as part of a team)
o 1. What went well in the project? What could have gone better? o 2. If working in a group What did you learn from working in a project group? How did the
interpersonal dynamics affect your participation? If there were conflicts, how were they resolved? o
3. What did you learn in completing this project about yourself and how you
work in a team environment?
o
4. What could have made this project a better learning experience?
If working in a group, include a statement of participation, describing how each person contributed to this project
deliverable. Please have each person sign the statement. Grading Rubrics
Grading Rubric (Week 2)
Category Points % Content 15 37.5% Content 15 37.5% Documentation and
Formatting 10 25% Total 40 100% Description
Defines project plans in detail with specific description of
project and requirements for teams
Provides specific information as required from the
Practitioner section of the Week 1 Lecture for the project
charter.
The deliverables should be formatted as a business
document correctly and should use APA formatting for
cited sources. Spelling and grammar must be accurate.
A quality paper will meet or exceed all of the above
requirements. Grading Rubric (Weeks 3–7)
Category Points Content 40 Documentation and
Formatting 10 Total 50 % Description
Full points are granted for content that demonstrates full
90% understanding of the technical requirements for the
deliverable.
The deliverables should be formatted as a business
10% document correctly and should use APA formatting for
cited sources. Spelling and grammar must be accurate.
A quality paper will meet or exceed all of the above
100%
requirements. Final Project Package Grading Rubric
Category
Points % Description
Content
80
53% The content should be complete (including all deliverables).
The business memo completely describes the package of work.
Business Memo
30
20%
The writing is clear, using proper grammar and spelling.
Lessons learned are thoughtful and writing is clear, using proper
Lessons Learned
30
20%
grammar and spelling.
The deliverables should be formatted correctly as a business
Documentation and
10
7% document and should use APA formatting for cited sources.
Formatting
Spelling and grammar must be accurate.
Total
150 100% A quality paper will meet or exceed all of the above requirements.

Example_1_Project_Proposal[1].pdf

PROJECT SELECTION/PROPOSAL FORM
Date: Assignment Date Project Title: The Tech Museum Expansion Project for Computer Evolution Gallery Responsible Manager:
Project Manager: Yes
Yes No
No The project will take more than 500 labor hours?
The project is a one-time effort (will not occur on a regular basis)? Project Type
Technology General Support Quality Legal Market Share Process Change Cost Reduction Replacement Customer New Product Capacity Other Problem Definition:
Over several years our guest surveys have shown a significant decrease in overall visitor
satisfaction due to inaccurate content expectations. We are finding that because we are
named The Tech Museum of Innovation that our visitors expect a portion of our museum to
be dedicated to information pertaining to computers. Our objective from conception was to
devote our resources to science and to educate the public on how technology affects our
lives. We made a conscience decision not to include computers in our exhibit mix. However,
with the increased urgency to build attendance, the Board of Directors decided that we must
aggressively pursue this opportunity in order to boost overall customer satisfaction and
increase attendance to build up our earned revenue. Our proposal presents an expansion of
our existing building that will house a gallery devoted to the evolution of the computer.
Goal Definition:
This proposed construction and expansion project will be the first major strategic alteration
we have made to our original concept, design and purpose. This building will be a 5,000
square foot wing that will (tentatively) be named “Computers: Yesterday, Today and
Tomorrow.” The expansion will be build out over the existing courtyard next to the rear
entrance to the museum. Our goal is to create a specific area that will be devoted to our
mission to support learning and education and will focus entirely on the timeline of
computers. It will provide information and education on the inception of computers into our
society, the latest and greatest of today’s computer technology, and what our major
technology company’s R&D departments are working on for the future. This new gallery will
be set up as a self-guided path using audio technology and text graphics. We will make the
commitment to the public that the information expressed will always be current and
relevant. We will provide the visitor with a look at real computers and components from the
past (40% of the exhibit space), currently available computers and components (40% of the
exhibit space) and at the end of the tour show footage on big screen monitors of where
computers are expected to be going (20% of the exhibit space). The exhibit will provide
hands-on learning opportunities as well as facts and information. We have agreements with
three major computer companies that they will make available to us display prototypes and
development information in turn for featuring their company logo and our recognition of
them as contributors. Version 2, 05/22/05 Page 1 of 2 PROJECT SELECTION/PROPOSAL FORM Goals that address our mission: The major focus of this exhibit project is to concentrate on our mission to Inspire the
Innovator in Everyone. Provide an environment of learning and education that benefits our children and the
community. Goals that address self-sustainment:
With this project in place we expect to stimulate public awareness that will affect these five
major revenue producing areas: Increase new attendance Increase school field trip attendance Build re-visitation attendance Increase gift and bookstore sales revenue Increase facility rentals
Objective Definition:
Performance:
Looking forward at our ten-year plan, we expect this new exhibit to
increase our earned revenue over that period by $5,200,000. The
market surveys that we conducted indicate that based on current
attendance figures the new exhibit will increase our attendance by 20%
in year one, 15% in year two and level off to a 10% increase annually
thereafter. At that rate based on current annual earned revenue of
$6,500,000 our added earned revenue in year one will total $1,300,000,
in year two the earned revenue increase will be $975,000. The project
cost will be covered in month one of year three.
Cost Estimate: Building expansion including plans, permits, labor and materials $1,400,000
Exhibit interior including labor, display materials, graphics and exhibit
components - $900,000
Total Project Cost: $2,300,000
Total Project Benefit Over Ten Years: $5,200,000 Schedule: Project duration expected to be 18 months. Version 2, 05/22/05 Page 2 of 2

Example_2_Scope_Statement[1].pdf

Scope Statement
Project Name: Developer Tool Management System (DTMS) Project Manager: DeVry Faculty Project Objective: To create a software package that can manage Information Technology (IT)
development tools, within 12 months and at a cost not to exceed $185,000.00 Deliverables: Milestones: Technical
Requirements: Main software package that will manage:
o Inventory
o Project management
o Maintenance
o Integration
o Security of IT development tools.
Management tool for managing source code reuse with a searchable index
for easily searching for snippets of code
Package that will provide a backup process for all development projects,
code, documents, and plans. Milestone
Scope Defined and Approved
Project Requirements Completed
Project Design Completed
DTMS Package Development Completed
Reusable Software Development Completed
Backup Management Development Completed
Testing DTMS System Completed
Training Completed
Pilot Completed
Deployment Completed
Post Implementation Review Completed Date
February 15th
March 1st
May 15th
June 30th
August 25th
September 12th
October 1st
November 1st
November 15th
December 7th
January 15th The software must be built in J2EE and comply with the standard development
processes. The system will provide 128 bit encryption and provide a security
model accessible though the corporate intranet and extranet.
The system will be compatible with Windows 2000 and Windows XP and provide a
standard Windows installation and uninstall program. The Reusable Software
package must provide the ability to hold up to 500GB of data with a searchable
index capable of parsing a 2MB xml file. Limits and
Exclusions: The software will remain proprietary to the organization and will not include a
packaging solution. The Help files will be in HTML format accessible through the
corporate intranet only and there will be no hard copy documentation. Customer Review: Tom Bosley and Rebecca Rainer will conduct the customer review and will provide
the subject matter expertise in the creation and fulfillment of the requirements.
The review will consist of ensuring the application works in Windows 2000 and XP will hold 500GB of data can parse a 2MB xml file in search will be accessible through intranet and extranet Version 3, 06/28/11 Page 1 of 2 Scope Statement Version 3, 06/28/11 Page 2 of 2

Example_3_Communication_Plan.pdf

Tech-Way Omni
Development Tool Management System (DTMS)
Communications Plan A. General Information Prepared by: Student Name Date: 29 November 2004 Authorized by: Student Name Project Description (Summary) Remote access services that provide network connectivity and security to
company resources. B.
Stakeholder List
All Stakeholders are located in the same geographical locations
Stakeholder Name / Title Project Role Architecture Support Group The customer who will use the software to support the development teams.
They are the final signoffs for the requirements and delivery of the software. Ed Mann – Architecture Group
Manager Customer Lead and interface point. He will receive copies of the weekly status
report. He will be responsible on the sign-off and acceptance milestones. Mike Spam – Assistant Vice President
Web Architecture and Project
Manager Executive Management. Mike will manage the entire project from Scope to
acceptance and final launch. Mike will be responsible for allocation of all
resources and approval of time schedules for the entire project. Development Team Focus Group Responsible for providing reviews of requirements, technology direction, and
beta reviews. The group will receive weekly status reports, access to all
documentation for the project, and access to of issues tracking database. C. Communication Document
Description
Project Status
Report Audience Expected Action All project team
members. Individual Status
submitted every
Friday Project Status
Web AVP’s from each
organization Update project
status, escalation Comm.
Class.
Mandatory Input Method Output Method Frequency Status
Update Form Mandatory Web input Combined
Status emailed every
Monday
Update
reminder sent Weekly per
the
expected
action.
Monthly Page 1 of 2 Responsible
resource
Tony Tony Tech-Way Omni
Development Tool Management System (DTMS)
Communications Plan Project Status
Meeting All project team
members. Executive
Status Update Senior Management
of all departments Issue
Management
Database
Phase Review
Signoff D. of all risk issues
Interaction Mandatory In person Update project
status, escalation
of all risk issues Mandatory All project team
members. Submit Issues as
they occur Optional Formal
Status
Report
Template
Issues
Database All project lead
members. Review
deliverables for the
phase Mandatory Phase
Review
Checklist through e-mail
Meeting Notes
in Word format
Executive
Summary
Issues Report
Template
available
during weekly
meeting
Phase Review
Report Weekly per
the
expected
action.
Monthly Bob Weekly per
the
expected
action. Tom Four
phases Joe Ed Method for Updating the Communication Plan The communications plan will be updated as needed and reviewed during the Executive Status Meeting monthly. Any changes to the
communication will be approved by the Architecture Group manager. Any changes to the plan will by disseminated during the weekly project
team meetings and updated on the Project Status Web E.
Existing Systems
There is a weekly organizational release meeting that is held by the Architecture group. We have been invited to attend the meeting to review
changes and major events to the organization. The information gathered here will be used in the project status meeting and included as
appropriate. The meeting will also address items and other systems that have an impact on us.
F.
Escalation Process
The initial review of the issue or risk will occur during the project status meeting as gathered by the Issue Management Database report. The
Project Status Web will be used to escalate any issues or risks not resolved during the weekly meetings. When the issue or risk is identified
in the Status Web, we will conduct a review and provide a contingency plan to the Executive Status meeting. If the issue or risk is still not
resolved, it will be assigned to an executive committee for action. Page 2 of 2

Example_4_-_Project_Schedule.mpp
Example_5_Risk_Managment_Plan.pdf

Risk Management Plan Project Name:
DAS Network Build-out
Project Description Summary:
This project is to provide a build out of the DAS Network
in Chicago. It requires new building infrastructure,
negotiations with the City of Chicago, and coordination
with various suppliers and vendors.
Project Manager:
DeVry Faculty
Date:
May 22nd, 2005
Revision Number:
1 a. Risk Identification
I have made a list of all areas that might cause project delays or failure with their
respective outcomes (see numerical list below). The five risks I have chosen as key risks
are bolded below and appear in the Risk Assessment Table in question “b”
1) Delay or denial of final franchise agreement with the city – this could
cause the project to stop or require negotiation with another entity (e.g.,
ComEd).
2) City site permitting process to cumbersome and requires longer than 72 hours
per submission for standard configurations – this could expand the commercial
launch date significantly.
3) Carrier/Customer Delay in License Agreement – This could delay or prevent
the capital funding required to begin construction and significantly impact the
entire timeline.
4) Lack of Infrastructure Availability – This is the lack of connectivity and
transport points within the city owned infrastructure which will require the
identification of a new path or the installation of new infrastructure. This will
increase cost and project completion time.
5) Delays in construction due to city operational events – City operations,
construction, road repair and maintenance, water main breaks, parades, sports
events, conventions. These can all cause changes in the construction and
installation schedule.
6) Labor Unions – Chicago is a union labor intensive environment. We will be
utilizing both skilled and unskilled labor to perform the construction and
installation tasks. There may be an issue on tasks that are scheduled to be
performed by specialized labor that utilizes non-union employees.
7) OEM Equipment availability – the DAS equipment that we utilize is specialized
fiber-optic repeater equipment that is manufactured and shipped from Sweden.
Any delays due to customs or manufacturer inventory shortfalls will delay the
project timeline.
8) Power plant installation issues – commercial power to all network elements is
provided by ComEd. This entity is notorious for introducing delays in fulfilling
orders for commercial power connections in the outside plant network.
9) Coverage Shortfalls – Once the equipment is installed and commissioned for
operations coverage testing is completed. If the coverage does not meet the
design specification ClearLinx will be required to correct and rectify at it’s cost
and there are potential time delay risks.
10) Fiber Optic Network installation quality failures – the fiber cable network must be
optimized and tested following installation to meet a specific signal level. If the
level is not met ClearLinx will be required to re-splice new fiber points to ensure
they achieve the proper quality level. Version 6: 06/28/11 Page 1 of 6 Risk Management Plan
11) Base Station Hotel Tandem Connectivity issues – this risk is realized if the local
LEC (SBC) has any capacity or interconnect shortfalls between their service wire
center and the Base Station Hotel.
12) Carrier interoperability and compatibility issues – performance problems that
result during the integration of the WSP’s equipment to the DAS network.
13) Weather issues – could cause construction delays.
b. Risk Assessment
The following is an assessment of these risks in terms of the probability of project
occurrence and the negative cost impact of project outcomes. Risk analysis attempts to
quantify the severity of the impact of an identified risk event, sometimes its probability,
and its sensitivity to change.
RISK SCORING MATRIX
Defined Conditions for Risk Management Analysis
Project
Objective
Cost Time Scope Quality Relative or Numerical Scales
Very Low - 1
Insignificant
Cost Increase
Insignificant
Schedule
Slippage
Scope
Decrease
Barely
Noticable
Quality
Degradation
Barely
Noticable Version 6: 06/28/11 Low - 2 Moderate - 3 High - 4 Very High - 5 < 5% Cost Increase 5-10% Cost
Increase 10-20% Cost
Increase > 20% Cost
Increase Schedule Slippage
<5% Overall Project
Slippage
5-10% Minor Areas of
Scope Affected Major Areas of
Scope Affected Only Very
Demanding
Applications Are
Affected Quality
Reduction
Requires Client
Approval Overall Project
Slippage
10-20%
Scope
Reduction
Unacceptable
to Client
Quality
Reduction
Unacceptable
to Client Overall Project
Slippage
>20%
Project End
Item is
Effectively
Useless
Project End
Item is
Effectively
Unusable Page 2 of 6 Risk Management Plan
RISK ASSESSMENT TABLE (using the above scoring matrix) Risk
Delay or denial of final franchise
agreement with the city
Carrier/Customer Delay in License
Agreement
City site permitting process to
cumbersome and requires longer than 72
hours per submission for standard
configurations
Lack of Infrastructure Availability
Labor Unions
Coverage Shortfalls
Delays in construction due to city
operational events
Power plant installation issues
OEM Equipment availability
Fiber Optic Network installation quality
failures
Carrier interoperability and compatibility
issues
Weather issues
Base Station Hotel Tandem Connectivity
issues Version 6: 06/28/11 RISK EVALUATION
Schedule Scope Quality Probability Cost Risk Score 90% 2 5 5 4 14.4 60% 2 5 3 1 6.6 20% 3 4 5 1 2.6 20%
20%
20% 5
5
4 5
5
4 2
1
2 1
1
1 2.6
2.4
2.2 15% 2 4 1 1 1.2 10%
10% 1
1 5
4 2
2 2
1 1.0
0.8 5% 2 2 1 5 0.5 5% 2 2 2 2 0.4 5% 1 4 1 1 0.4 5% 1 2 2 1 0.3 Page 3 of 6 Risk Management Plan
c. Risk Response
For each risk we have determined the action to be taken if the risk should occur: accept,
shape, reduce, or transfer the risk. The following risk response table identifies a brief
contingency plan for these risks. That is followed by a detailed delineation of the two
risks with the highest expected values.
RISK RESPONSE TABLE Risk event Franchise Agreement Delay from the City Carrier/Customer Delay in License
Agreement
Lack of Infrastructure Availability Labor Unions Coverage Shortfalls Response:
Accept,
Reduce,
Contingency plan
Trigger
Share,
Transfer
Accept
Redo Schedule
Agreement
reduce all slack
incomplete by
Nov 1, 2003
Reduce
Offer customer
Agreement
incentives
incomplete by
January 1 2004
Transfer
Identify
Failed
replacement street interconnect
furniture
inspection walks
Reduce
Negotiate terms Stop work on
with local
construction
labor
Share
Cluster re-designs Failed Drive
and Node
Tests
placement Who is
Responsible Name Name Name Name Name Contingency Plans for the Two Highest Risks
First Highest Risk - Franchise Agreement Delay from the City
The first highest risk to the project is the delay or denial of the final Franchise
Agreement from the City to use the City owned infrastructure to complete the buildout of the DAS network. I feel the best contingency plan is to immediately finalize
the negotiation of a Joint Use agreement with ComEd to share available
infrastructure in the City public Rights-of-Way (ROW). This has already been
investigated as an available resource. This appears to be the only apparent available
contingency plan. The issue with using the ComEd ROW is each network node
location will still need city permit approval. This approval will subject to ClearLinx
using the standards already determined in joint use provisions associated with
developing telecommunications within the city owned public ROW. These provisions
will require additional standards and costs that were not required in dealing directly
with the city as in the original infrastructure deal. This contingency plan will require
the overall project plan to be expanded by at least 6 months. This 6 month period
will allow the time required to complete the Joint Use agreements with ComEd. It will
also allow ClearLinx to develop a work flow process to support a “fast track” method
to getting network node and elements approved and permitted through the city
permitting process. We feel that this is possible given the city cannot politically
support anything other than a swift handling of the ClearLinx permit submissions
Version 6: 06/28/11 Page 4 of 6 Risk Management Plan
given they were not able to provide approval directly. The additional cost associated
with this contingency plan will be based on the tariff rates associated with the Joint
Use Agreement for the use of ComEd poles, conduit and other infrastructure. These
additional costs will be as follows:
1) The sum of all the infrastructure lease costs from ComEd.
2) The additional costs associated with the per node construction permit approval
process from the city.
3) Any additional materials and installation costs associated with moving the
network elements from the proposed City infrastructure to the ComEd owned
infrastructure.
4) The additional costs associated with ComEd “make ready” fees and ROW fees
based on PUC defined “Joint Use” costs.
5) The additional insurance and bonding requirements of ComEd as the utility as
opposed to the original City insurance and bonding levels.
6) The premium costs incurred by virtue that all work on utility infrastructure must
be done by the utility or it’s subcontractors at ClearLinx’s cost.
Second Highest Risk - Carrier/Customer Delay in License Agreement
The second highest risk to the project is the delay in the License Agreement between
ClearLinx and the Customer (or the WSP). This delay in negotiations can be the
results of price, feature functionality options or terms and conditions in the contract.
If ClearLinx experiences these delays it will use its ability to offer incentives to the
customer in order to complete and execute this agreement. The ClearLinx DAS
network is a shared network and ClearLinx acts as a Neutral Host Provider. This
means that ClearLinx will make this network available to multiple service providers
on a shared cost basis. The incentive for the “first mover” is a lower lease rate than
its competitors. ClearLinx require at least one executed agreement with a WSP in
order to obtain access to its capital that funds the construction build-out. ClearLinx,
as part of its contingency plan, will offer the first signing WSP free rent for a
negotiated number of months in order to close the License Agreement contract. This
agreement is critical to the project. Without at least one WSP license agreement
executed prior to start of construction the project is in jeopardy of failure. The
additional costs associated with this contingency plan are as follows:
1) The additional time and lost revenue as part of the expanded negotiation process.
This should include additional legal fees and any free services provided as part of
the offering to the WSP.
2) Any additional network features or infrastructure cost incentives that are
provided as part of the offering. Version 6: 06/28/11 Page 5 of 6 Risk Management Plan
d. Risk Assessment Matrix
Each and all of the identified risks have been explained at the beginning of this report.
The following Risk Assessment Matrix should support my choice of “Franchise
Agreement Delay from the City” as the first highest risk factor. Franchise
delay 5
4
Likelihood Lack of
Infrastructure Coverage
short Carrier
delay
Labor
union 3
Impact 4 5 3
2
1
1 Version 6: 06/28/11 2 Page 6 of 6

Example_6_Final_Project_Proposal.pdf

Student Name The Tech Museum Expansion Project
Student Name
MGMT404 Project Management
DeVry University Online Assignment Date Student Name Executive Summary
Over several years The Tech Museum guest surveys have shown a significant decrease in
overall visitor satisfaction due to inaccurate content expectations. They are finding that
because they are named The Tech Museum of Innovation that their visitors expect a portion
of the museum to be dedicated to information pertaining to computers. The objective from
conception was to devote their resources to science and to educate the public on how
technology affects our lives. The Tech Museum founders made a conscience decision not to
include computers in their exhibit mix. However, with the increased urgency to build
attendance, the Board of Directors decided that they must aggressively pursue this
opportunity in order to boost overall customer satisfaction and increase attendance to build
earned revenue. This proposal presents an expansion of the existing museum building that
will house a gallery devoted to the evolution of the computer. Scope Statement
Goal Definition
This proposed construction and expansion project will be the first major strategic alteration
The Tech Museum has made to their original concept design and purpose. This building will
be a 5,000 square foot wing that will be named Computers: Yesterday, Today and
Tomorrow. The expansion will be build out over the existing courtyard next to the rear
entrance to the museum. The goal is to create a specific area that will be devoted to The
Tech’s mission to support learning and education and will focus entirely on the timeline of
computers. It will provide information and education on the inception of computers into our
society, the latest and greatest of today’s computer technology, and what our major
technology company’s R&D departments are working on for the future. This new gallery will
be set up as a self-guided path using audio technology and text graphics. The Tech
Museum will make the commitment to the public that the information expressed will always
be current and relevant. This exhibit will provide the visitor with a look at real computers Student Name
and components from the past (40% of the exhibit space), currently available computers
and components (40% of the exhibit space) and at the end of the tour show footage on big
screen monitors of where computers are expected to be going (20% of the exhibit space).
The exhibit will provide hands on learning opportunities as well as facts and information.
They have agreements with three major computer companies that they will make available,
for exhibit display, prototypes and development information in turn for featuring their
company logo and The Tech Museum’s recognition of them as contributors.
Goals that address the mission The major focus of this exhibit project is to concentrate on the mission to Inspire the
Innovator in Everyone. Provide an environment of learning and education that benefits our children and the
community. Goals that address self-sustainment
With this project in place we expect to stimulate public awareness that will affect these five
major revenue producing areas: Increase new attendance Increase school field trip attendance Build re-visitation attendance Increase gift and bookstore sales revenue Increase facility rentals Objective definition
Looking forward at a ten-year plan they expect this new exhibit to increase their earned
revenue over that period by $5,200,000. The market surveys that have been conducted
indicate that based on current attendance figures the new exhibit will increase attendance
by 20% in year one, 15% in year two and level off to a 10% increase annually thereafter.
At that rate, based on current annual earned revenue of $6,500,000, the added earned Student Name
revenue in year one will total $1,300,000, in year two the earned revenue increase will be
$975,000. The project cost will be covered in month one of year three.
Cost
Building expansion including plans, permits, labor and materials - $1,400,000
Exhibit interior including labor, display materials, graphics and exhibit components $900,000
Total Project Cost: $2,300,000
Total Project Benefit Over Ten Years: $5,200,000
Project duration expected to be 18 months.
Project Objectives
To build a 5,000 square foot addition to the existing facility that will house a new exhibit
dedicated to the evolution of computers. This gallery will include the exhibit area, a 12X12’
corner, with a register podium, where merchandise will be sold at the exit of the exhibit,
and a 1,000 square foot glasses climate controlled room for sensitive equipment. The
finished exhibit will contain computer equipment, information and educational materials on
computer technology from its inception, the present technologies and future technology
expectations. This is expected to be a 16- month project, and will be completed on a
budget not to exceed $2.3 million. Project completion and Grand Opening is scheduled for
Friday, December 2, 2005. Student Name
Project Deliverables
Intermediate outcomes - As this expansion project progresses we will deliver to our
customer, The Tech Museum, a 5,000 square foot constructed building attached to the main
building of The Tech Museum. We will complete acquisition of computer equipment and
gallery display components, as well as, the completion of the interior area including
furnishings and design of the computer evolution gallery. We will install all exhibit
components, including the donated prototypes of future technology that is donated by
technology business partners. We will complete testing of exhibit components to ensure
that all exhibits are working to specifications and we will complete an extensive walkthrough one week prior to public opening.
Final outcome - An addition to the existing museum housing an exhibit on computer
evolution named Computers: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow, that is on-line and ready for
public visitation.
Milestones
Milestone Date All permits approved
Contractor contracts signed
Ground breaking ceremony
Courtyard demolition completed and foundation poured
Building construction completed
All electrical and plumbing work completed
Fire alarms and sprinkler installation completed
Final building inspection
All interior work completed including paint, carpet, floor lights, exhibit
display units and furnishings
Interactive and exhibit computers and monitors, including three flatscreens, installed and tested
Graphics and audio system installation completed and final walkthrough and internal inspection conducted
Gallery opens to the public (soft opening)
Grand opening ceremony 1/3/2005
1/31/2005
2/4/2005
3/25/2005
4/29/2005
5/27/2005
6/15/2005
6/24/2005
8/26/2005
10/28/2005
11/20/2005
11/26/2005
12/2/2005 Student Name
Technical Requirements
This building will be properly licensed by the City of San Jose and will meet or exceed all
building code and safety standards. It will include 150 telephone ports for computers,
telephone and store register, and all equipment will be properly surge protected. The
gallery will be electrically self-contained and along with ceiling lights it will include recessed
floor lights that will run along the path of the exhibit. The building will be heated or airconditioned accordingly with the climate-controlled glass area set to a constant sixty eight
degrees. Exhibit area will include two 35” and one 72” flat screen monitors for displaying
current visitor information.
Limits and Exclusions
The project will not guarantee the content of the information provided by The Tech Museum Education
and Learning Group for the gallery graphics and audio presentations. The project responsibility only
extends to the visual and audio specifications of all exhibit equipment, not the content itself. The project
responsibility for all maintenance to the building and equipment ends upon completion. Further
maintenance and building upkeep is the responsibility of The Tech Museum. All site work is limited to the
hours of 7:30 A.M. until 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday, except for holidays and Union imposed
designated days off. This project does not include negotiations with technology partners for donations,
nor do we take responsibility for any equipment donated to the exhibit. This addition will not include a
restroom area. Student Name Reporting Structure of Team Members
The Board of Directors will be responsible for the final approval of the project and will
determine the success level at completion. The Executive Committee will facilitate risk
probabilities and scope changes. This committee will meet with the Project Manager should
cost or duration problems arise. The Review Committee will conduct the final inspection and
audit, which will be presented to the Executive Committee and the Board of Directors. The
findings within the scheduled and final audits will help determine the degree of success the
project achieved. Day to day decision making responsibilities will be based on levels of
concern, as shown in the matrix below. Operational decisions will be delegated to the
appropriate level, however, should a problem arise that might affect duration or cost of the
activity, it shall be brought to the immediate attention of the Project Manager.
Decision Making and Concern Levels Matrix Level
One
Two
Three Four Type
Project Completion
Major Scope Changes
Major Risk Assessment
Successes/Failures
Overall Project Related
Scheduling Changes
Minor Scope Deviations
Communication Plan
Changes
Work packages and
Related Activities Responsible Party(ies)
Board of Directors
Executive Committee
Review Committee
Project Manager Project Team Mangers Student Name
The following organization chart illustrates the organization of the project team for the
Expansion project. Project Organization Chart Board of Directors Executive
Commitee Review
Committee Project Manager Construction
Team Manager Sub-contractors Carpenters Facilities
Team Manager Facilities
Design Graphics
Design Store
Team IT
Team Manager Marketing
Team Manager IT
Team Marketing
Team Union Workers Bill Morris, Construction Team Manager will oversee outside facility expectations. He will work closely
with Steve Eisner who will monitor customer expectations of the project. Steve has worked for The Tech
Museum for twelve years and has a firm understanding of our customer’s expectations. High-Level Gantt Chart View
Work Breakdown Structure
The following Work Breakdown Structure or WBS Gantt Chart provides a snapshot of the
project and indicates that the project objectives will be performed by both internal and
external project team members. Because the grand opening must be advertised well in advance to both the public and to Tech Museum members, it is imperative that the
completion date is strictly adhered to. It is important that it is understood and agreed upon Student Name
by all stakeholders that this is considered a time-constrained project. The risks that could
affect this time-constrained structure will be discussed in the following section.
ID WBS 1 Task Name Duration 1 Tech Museu m Expansion Project Start Finish % Comp. Cost Work 338 days Fri 7/30/04 Fri 12/2/05 0% $2,300,000.00 783.5 days 2 1.1 Facility Construction Exterior 168 days Fri 7/30/04 Thu 3/31/05 0% $1,195,100.00 182.5 days 19 1.2 Facility Construction In terior 64 days Tue 3/1/05 Fri 5/27/05 0% $204,900.00 74.5 days 27 1.3 Final Building Inspection Wed 6/1/05 Wed 6/1/05 0% $9,840.00 4 day s 28 1.4 Gallery Exhibit Tue 11/29/05 0% $852,960.00 507.5 days 66 1.5 Complete Mock Exhibit Runthrough 67 1.6 Sof t Opening 68 1.7 69
70 1 day
190 days Tue 3/1/05 1 day Wed 11/16/05 Wed 11/16/05 0% $1,600.00 4 day s 7 day s Mon 11/21/05 Thu 12/1/05 0% $3,920.00 7 day s Customer Sign Of f 1 day Thu 11/17/05 Thu 11/17/05 0% $0.00 1 day 1.8 Grand Opening Ceremony 1 day Fri 12/2/05 Fri 12/2/05 0% $26,680.00 3 day s 1.9 Project Completion Celebration 1 day Fri 12/2/05 Fri 12/2/05 0% $5,000.00 0 day s Risk Analysis
Possible Risks - The top five are marked with an asterisk (*).
Because this is a time-constrained project, any schedule delays that occur will require
adding resources, therefore, adding additional costs to the project. Permits delayed *Imminent Union strike Weather delays Material not arriving on time Software complications *Donors of prototype equipment fail on their commitment Scope changes by customer *Final building inspection requires more work Graphics not completed on time Special audio tour equipment is delayed Receive poor feedback on visitor surveys Fixtures arrive damaged *Electrical estimates may not be adequate for actual load on the system *We experience a major earthquake Student Name
RISK ASSESSMENT
This matrix explains the level and impact the top five risks have on the project. It assesses
the potential risk by the likelihood that the risk will take place, five being the highest
probability down to one being most improbable. It also looks at the level of impact the
occurrence of the risk will have on the project. Five would be the worst case scenario and
one having little impact.
RISK SCORING MATRIX
Defined Conditions for Risk Management Analysis
Project
Objective
Cost Time Scope Quality Relative or Numerical Scales
Very Low - 1
Insignificant
Cost Increase
Insignificant
Schedule
Slippage
Scope
Decrease
Barely
Noticable
Quality
Degradation
Barely
Noticable Low - 2 Moderate - 3 High - 4 Very High - 5 < 5% Cost Increase 5-10% Cost
Increase 10-20% Cost
Increase > 20% Cost
Increase Schedule Slippage
<5% Overall Project
Slippage
5-10% Minor Areas of
Scope Affected Major Areas of
Scope Affected Only Very
Demanding
Applications Are
Affected Quality
Reduction
Requires Client
Approval Overall Project
Slippage
10-20%
Scope
Reduction
Unacceptable
to Client
Quality
Reduction
Unacceptable
to Client Overall Project
Slippage
>20%
Project End
Item is
Effectively
Useless
Project End
Item is
Effectively
Unusable RISK ASSESSMENT TABLE (using the above scoring matrix) Risk
Union Strike
Donor of Prototype Fails to Deliver
Final Building Inspection Requires
More Work
Electrical Estimates May Not Be
Adequate for Actual Load on the
System
Major Earthquake RISK EVALUATION
Schedule
Scope
5
3
5
5 Probability
90%
60% Cost
4
2 Quality
3
4 Risk Score
13.5
9.6 40% 4 5 3 1 5.2 40% 3 4 3 2 4.8 10% 5 5 3 4 1.7 Student Name RISK RESPONSE MATRIX
This next matrix gives an overview of response that would take place should any of these
risks occur and those responsible for implementation of the response. Risk event Union Strike Response:
Accept,
Reduce,
Share,
Transfer Contingency plan Trigger Accept Hire non-union
workers to
proceed with the
work not requiring
a high level of skill. Union
negotiations are
not finalized by
10/31/04 Donor of Prototypes Fail to Deliver Reduce Final Building Inspection Requires More
Work Transfer Electrical Estimates Not Adequate for Actual
Load on the System. Transfer Major Earthquake Accept Who is
Responsible Bill Morris Negotiations and Steve Eisner
We will fill that
commitment
space with a
between The
technology
Tech Museum
component from and their current
our retired
technology
Cyberplace exhibit. business donor
fails.
Two workers from City of San Jose Steve Eisner
each subbuilding
contractor will be inspector is not
on hand the day of satisfied with the
the inspection.
completed work.
Electrical subBill Morris
contractor has
When full
contingency plans electrical load is
to increase the
applied to the
capacity of the
system
electrical system.
Earthquake
Pat Helmling
insurance has been This is not an
purchased to cover event that can
partial economic be anticipated.
losses. Highest Risk #1 – Union Strike
The negotiations between workers and the Carpenters Union are not going well and it is
anticipated that the contract that the union is proposing will be rejected. The current
contract expires on October 31, 2004 which comes right at the beginning of our construction Student Name
phase of the project. Because there is no way to predict how long a strike could go on, if
there is to be a strike, we are prepared to use our contingency plan. We have contracted with several independent, non-union carpenters and have entered into
a will-call agreement with them. These selected carpenters will receive a bonus so that they
will prioritize our request should they be needed to work on our project. They have agreed
to make themselves available starting November 1, 2004 until otherwise notified by us, to
come to work on the project on a days notice. If a strike deems it necessary to call them on
the project, they will perform certain unskilled tasks that will keep the project moving and
will help to minimize the delay a strike would cause. These carpenters will not perform any
special skills work or deviate from original plans. The agreement is that they will work for
us for the duration of the strike and be paid union wages. This event will cause added costs
to the project and those overages will be charged to the budget reserve account.
Added Costs:
Bonus paid for immediate work
Additional time for fencing
Material costs
Overtime costs
Highest Risk #2 – Electrical Estimates Not Adequate for Actual Load on the System
In his experience, Bill Morris has encountered problems concerning specifications of the
electrical layouts. Bill has been in several situations where bids have been accepted from
electrical contractors that assure that their estimates are accurate and even exceed the
requirements necessary. On several of the occasions, once full load was placed on the
system, it proved too much for the specification. An electrical system failure could have far
reaching implications, but the cost to the project to change the specification at any point
during the project would be extremely costly. The major risk that this poses is, should this Student Name
occur and because this risk would be so late in the project, it could delay the opening of the
gallery and place marketing efforts in jeopardy.
If we would have to postpone the grand opening, it would undermine all of the pre-opening
advertising. Because this has been deemed a time-constrained project, we would need to
add resources and schedule overtime to make sure the project is completed on time. The
contingency plan for this risk is to require from any electrical sub-contractor interested in
bidding on this project, a written guarantee that should specifications not perform to the
fullest extent that the said sub-contractor will provide all labor and materials and pay all
overtime costs to ensure we stay within time limits. Communication Plan
Stakeholders:
Pat Helmling – Project Manager
Bill Morris – Head Construction Contractor and Construction Project Team Manager
Steve Eisner – Facilities Project Team Manager and The Tech Museum Director of Facilities
Lisa Meyers – IT Project Team Manager and The Tech Museum Director of IT Team
Facility Design Project Team
Graphics Project Team
Board of Directors
Store Project Team
Review Committee
Executive Committee
John Ito – Marketing Project Team Manager and The Tech Museum Director or Marketing Student Name
Communication Plan Matrix
The following chart shows the layout of the how project information will be communicated to and from the various stakeholders
and the person(s) responsible for that communication.
Document
Description
Project
Newsletter Issue Log Project
Update
Meeting
Project
Status
Report Scope
Update
Meeting
Scope
Change Log Audience Expected Action All project
team
members
and all
Tech
Museum
Employees
All project
team
members Communication
Project
information All project
team leads
and
managers
All project
team
members Review
Committee
and
Executive
Committee
All project
team Comm.
Class
Optional Input Method Output
Method
E-mail Frequency Resource First Monday
of each
month Pat Update any issues
that could
adversely affect
the project, i.e.
risks or delays
Interaction and
project updates Mandatory E-mail to PM or
log in binder
located in PM
office Reviewed in
person Daily Steve and
Pat Mandatory In person Weekly
Mondays Pat Summarize
updates from
update meeting Mandatory Weekly
Tuesdays Pat Update and
review of the
project scope
statement Mandatory Project update
forms, issue log
and scope
change log, and
outcomes from
Project Update
Meeting
In person Minutes
recorded and
sent to
audience
Short outline
of project
statue e-mail
and hardcopy
document Biweekly Pat Record all scope
changes and their Mandatory Minutes
recorded and
sent to
attendees via
e-mail
Reviewed in
person Daily Pat Project update
forms and
personal
observations Scope Change
Form Student Name managers
Executive
Update
Report Informal
Project
Comments All project
team
managers,
Review
Committee,
Executive
Committee
and Board
of Directors
All project
team
members Advertising
Report All project
managers Deliverables
Signoff All project
managers
and
Executive
committee
All
concerned
parties and
project
team
managers Issue
Analysis
and
Resolution
Meeting affects on the
project
Update project
status, including
potential risks or
delays Mandatory Project status
reports, issue
log and scope
change log In person and
hardcopy
documentation Monthly Pat Any comments
concerning the
project. Ideas or
suggestions for
improvement of
processes
Update on the
advertising and
opening of the
completed project
Review and
signoff of
deliverables Optional E-mail to Steve
or in person
using bulletin
board in PM
office Posted in PM
office As needed Steve Mandatory Marketing
Department
communication E-mail Biweekly John Mandatory Project status
report and scope
statement In person On each
deliverable
completion
date Steve To resolve issues
and/or risks Mandatory Issues log, faceto-face
discussions E-mail and
hardcopy
documentation As necessary Pat and
Steve The communication plan will be reviewed at the project update meetings for possible
changes. The proposed changes or additions will be reviewed by all project managers for
approval. Changes will be communicated through e-mail and an updated hardcopy will be
placed on the project communication bulletin board in the PM office. Changes will be
presented to the executive committee in the executive update report. The Tech Museum holds a leadership committee meeting every week that the project
manager has been invited to attend. This meeting consists of organization wide information
and is where top decisions are made that impacts the organization as a whole. By attending
this meeting the project manager will be able to have prior knowledge of any decisions that
will affect the project, and will communicate all pertinent project information to this
leadership team. For the duration of the project, an informal project update will be a
permanent agenda item.
All issues and/or problems will be logged in the issues log that will be reviewed daily by the
project manager and the facilities team manager. It will be the responsibility of the project
manager and the facilities team manager to follow up on the issues and try to resolve them
at this level. If the issue can not be resolved, and a risk factor is involved, then a special
meeting will be called that will include those citing the issue and all project team managers.
If there is still no resolution to the issue/risk, a review will be conducted by the executive
committee who will then decide on a solution to minimize or neutralize the risk. If necessary
a new course of action will be determined. Performance Measurement and Control Approach
The quantitative measures that will monitor project cost and schedule performance will be
the use of budget and tracking reports generated by the project software. We will be
looking at deviations from baseline numbers in comparison to time phased work completed.
Using this information we can determine affects on the budget down to the individual work Student Name
packages, and if we are encountering activity delays. We will use the Gantt Tracking Chart
to determine the critical path of the project and identify those task that need to be given
special attention. We will include a measurement report as part of the project status report
and the executive analysis report. Should it be determined that action needs to be taken,
we have addressed those steps earlier in this report. Qualitative measures will be performed primarily by Bill and Steve, through scheduled
project walkthroughs, who will bring to the project manager’s attention any areas of
concern. It is our commitment to our customer to adhere to the high quality of standards
that this museum prides itself on by producing a high quality architectural structure, as well
as, presenting to their visitors, state of the art exhibit components. Between the vast
experience of Bill in the construction business and the knowledge of customer expectation
from Steve, we can be sure that this team is well qualified to measure the quality of the
project during th...

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Project Selection March 2014.docx

Project Selection/Proposal Form
Date: Assignment date
Project title: Open a computer coffee shop near a college campus
Responsible Manager: Nicky Johnson
Project Manager: Ashley Smith
This project...

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