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0 Points Question 4 of 6 Which of the following words would you be pronouncing correctly if you were to make the first sound of this word by at...

This is one of the questions on my Linguistic test. I have no idea how to do it. Could you please give me a help?
I've also attached a word documents with couple of multiple choice questions inside. Could you give me the correct answers if there is anything wrong?

The word for the product TEA in the languages of the world is either a form based on Sinitic cha (for example, cha [ʃa] in Portuguese), one based on the Min Nan Chinese word te (for example, tea in English), or something else, as shown on this map. The explanation for this is that products coming originally from one part of the world that come to be traded all over the world strongly invite borrowing of the name of this product. Because of this, the fact that English has the word tea and Malay has teh does not suggest a genetic relationship between English and Malay. By contrast, words for basic things in human experience are usually part of the basic vocabulary of languages and resist loss or replacement by borrowing. Their pronunciations and meanings, however, can change considerably over time. With this in mind, summarize the sound and meaning regularities and correspondences for WATER and related concepts in the following languages of Eurasia and say what the best explanation for the these probably is and what language they must originally be from. Note: "obl" indicates the form of a word in an oblique or genitive case, which can mean that a different allomorph of the root is employed or a suffix has been added, or both.

vodka 'vodka, diminutive of water' (Russian)
woda 'water' (Polish)
watar or (obl) weten 'water' (Hittite)
water with [t], [ɾ], or [ʔ] as dialectal variants for the middle consonant sound (English)
Wasser 'water' with [v] as the first consonant sound (German)
vatn 'water' (Icelandic)
vesi or (obl)veden 'water' (Finnish)
ύδωρ [uðor] 'water' (Greek)
udens 'water' (Latvian)
vátr 'humid, wet' (Old Norse)
wet (English)
wātin 'flowing continuously (of water)' (Arabic)
vaṭi 'drip, trickle' (Tamil)
Question 4 of 6 1.0 Points Which of the following words would you be pronouncing correctly if you were to make the first sound of this word by at least: i. raising your velum so air cannot escape through the nose; ii. bringing the tip of your tongue onto the alveolar ridge, completely obstructing the flow of air; and iii. vibrating your vocal cords. A. dimple B. notable C. time D. sleep Consider the data below (taken from Exercise 25 on page 140 of your textbook) showing the distribution of voiced and voiceless high vowels in Mokilese [Note: Voiceless vowels are indicated by a small circle under the phonetic symbol. So [i] is voiced and [i] is ̥ voiceless). a. [pisan] ̥ full of leaves b. [kisa] ̥ we two c. [puko] ̥ basket d. [dupukda] ̥ bought e. [pil] water f. [apid] outrigger support g. [uduk] flesh h. [lu uk] ʤ to tackle After looking over this data, what can you conclude is happening with high vowels in Mokilese? A. High vowels assimilate in voicing to the consonants immediately before and after them. B. High vowels assimilate in place to the consonants immediately before and after them. C. Voiceless vowels occur between voiceless consonants. D. Voiceless vowels occur between voiced consonants. E. Both A and C. F. Both B and C. G. Both A and D. Question 4 of 4 1.0 Points
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For the /t/ sound In English, speakers often use an alveolar tap (which is like a weakened stop), [ ], instead of a full stop between vowels and an alveolar stop, [t], at ɾ the beginning or end of a word, as in the following examples: [b i] 'Betty' ɛɾ [b r] 'butter' ʌɾ [bæ r] 'batter' ɾ [b t] 'but' ʌ [t b] 'tub' ʌ [tri] 'tree' For the [ ] and the [t] sounds, where you have one, you can never have the other. This ɾ means they are: A. In complementary distribution and are separate phonemes in English. B. In contrastive distribution and are allophones of the same phoneme in English. C. In contrastive distribution and are separate phonemes in English. D. In complementary distribution and are allophones of the same phoneme in English. Consider the data in (a)-(f), which represent ungrammatical permutations of the following answer (A) to the conversation-starting question (Q): Q: What did you do today? A: I told Sally that she should retire. a. *I told that she should retire Sally. b. *I Sally told that she should retire. c. *I told Sally Bill that she should retire. d. *I told that she should retire. e. *I told Sally that she should retire that she is old. f. *I told Sally. The data in (a)-(f) should tell you what the arguments of 'told' are. Knowing this, complete the phrase structure rule below such that it accommodates 'told' and its arguments. VP → __________ A. V NP CP B. V CP C. V NP Consider the data in (a)-(f), which represent ungrammatical permutations of the following answer (A) to the conversation-starting question (Q):
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