View the step-by-step solution to:

Article 1 BUILDING A COLLABORATIVE SCHOOL CULTURE USING APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY Dickerson, Mark S. Researchers World2. 2 (Apr 2011): 25-36.

This question was answered on Apr 01, 2013. View the Answer
Search the Ashford University Library databases for two articles discussing the benefits of a professional learning community to school culture and examine Figure 2 of your text, Differentiated Instructional Strategies in Practice: Training, Implementation, and Supervision. Using this research, design a professional development plan for your school that will positively impact school culture. In a three- to five-page paper, discuss the following:
(I have already uploaded the information so you do not have to worry about the Ashford library....)

Summarize your research and the research in Figure 2 (Joyce & Showers, 1995).
How is this research applicable to your work setting?- (already uploaded the information)
Discuss the professional development plan that you have created.
How will this plan benefit school culture?
Integrate the research you have found on professional development and include appropriate references within your discussion.
(you can google professional development plan to get a better understanding).
Article 1 BUILDING A COLLABORATIVE SCHOOL CULTURE USING APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY Dickerson, Mark S . Researchers World 2. 2 (Apr 2011): 25-36. Turn on hit highlighting for speaking browsers Hide highlighting Abstract (summary) Translate Abstract This article reviews the benefits of a collaborative school culture, including reduced teacher isolation, social and emotional support, opportunities for professional development and learning, and closer ties with significant stakeholders, such as families and community organizations. While collaborative cultures may be powerful, they also may be either misguided or superficial. Further, cultural change is difficult and norms such as teacher isolation and autonomy are well entrenched. These concerns point to the need for a change process that has a positive focus, is essentially self-organizing, encourages deep reflection, and avoids the pitfalls of manipulation by school administrators. This analysis points to consideration of appreciative inquiry, a strengths- based process that builds on 'the best of what is' in an organization. The second portion of the article reports on the impact that an appreciative inquiry process had on building a collaborative culture in 22 schools located in British Columbia, Canada and reflects on its strengths and limitations. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT] Full Text Translate Full text Headnote ABSTRACT This article reviews the benefits of a collaborative school culture, including reduced teacher isolation, social and emotional support, opportunities for professional development and learning, and closer ties with significant stakeholders, such as families and community organizations. While collaborative cultures may be powerful, they also may be either misguided or superficial. Further, cultural change is difficult and norms such as teacher isolation and autonomy are well entrenched. These concerns point to the need for a change process that has a positive focus, is essentially self-organizing, encourages deep reflection, and avoids the pitfalls of manipulation by school administrators. This analysis points to consideration of appreciative inquiry, a strengths-based process that builds on 'the best of what is' in an organization. The second portion of the article reports on the impact that an appreciative inquiry process had on building a collaborative culture in 22 schools located in British Columbia, Canada and reflects on its strengths and limitations. Keywords: appreciative inquiry, collaboration, school culture, school change INTRODUCTION: One of the strands of educational reform movements in the last two decades has been the call for greater collaborative efforts, both among educators as well as with parents, students and the surrounding community (Hargreaves, 1994; James, Dunning, Connolly, & Elliott, 2007; Rosenholtz, 1989). Educational researcher Hargreaves (1994) referred to collaboration as an
Background image of page 01
'articulating and integrating principle' (p. 245) for school improvement, providing a way for teachers to learn from each other, gain moral support, coordinate action, and reflect on their classroom practices, their values, and the meaning of their work. Hargreaves argued that in some contexts 'collaboration replaces false scientific certainties or debilitating occupational uncertainties with the situated certainties of collected professional wisdom among particular communities of teachers' (p. 246). PERCEIVED BENEFITS OF COLLABORATION AMONG EDUCATORS: One of the reasons that researchers such as Hargreaves promote collaborative efforts among teachers is to reduce levels of teacher isolation so that teachers can share professional practices and have occasion to observe each other in the classroom or discuss their work (Lortie, 1975). In the ordinary course, a typical school structure provides little in the way of teacher interaction except for time spent in administrative committees or brief interchanges in a teachers' lounge (Rosenholtz, 1989; Lortie, 1975; Little, 1990a). Darling-Hammond (1990) illustrated the extent of teacher isolation in her record of this statement made by a high school teacher with 20 years experience: 'I have taught 20,000 classes; I have been evaluated 30 times; but I have never seen another teacher teach' (p. 40). Studies have indicated that the opportunity for teachers to be engaged with each other and share their experience, provided them with much needed emotional support, made them feel affirmed as worthy professionals, increased their ability to apply new teaching methods and materials, allowed them to train each other, provided them with a greater perspective of the entire school system, and made them more accepting of diverse perspectives (Cunningham, 1994; Little, 1990b; Nias, 1999). A collaborative culture is also important to undergird efforts at school improvement. Nias (2005) contends a teacher's relationships with colleagues has significant impact on the teacher's professional development by providing (or failing to provide) technical and emotional support, a reference group with whom the teacher can identify, the scope and incentive to grow professionally and the opportunity to influence others. Interaction among educators can also lead to collaborative efforts of a special kind, known as professional learning communities or 'teacher learning communities' which McLaughlin and Talbert (2001) defined as 'teachers' joint efforts to generate new knowledge of practice and their mutual support of each others' professional growth' (p. 75). These networks of teachers seek to provide educators with a sense of personal efficacy and responsibility and a forum for critical reflection and professional development (DuFour & Eaker, 1998; James et al., 2007; Lieberman & Miller, 2007), and may also improve practice, encourage innovation, open participants to change, and create a collective vision (McLaughlin & Talbert, 1993; Rosenholtz, 1989). COLLABORATION AMONG STAKEHOLDERS: Collaborative school cultures are not only characterized by close relationships among educators, they also feature close ties to families and the surrounding community. In their review of research studies on partnerships between schools, families and communities in 20 nations, Sanders and Epstein (2005) found the success of schools is heavily influenced by connections between school, family and community. They noted that 'students who receive support from home, family and community are triply benefitted, and are more likely to be academically successful than those who do not' (p. 215). Partnerships among stakeholders provide opportunities to share resources, such as personnel, expertise, and facilities, address issues that go beyond the scope of one individual or
Background image of page 02
Show entire document
Sign up to view the entire interaction

Top Answer

Here's the explanation you needed for... View the full answer

8443796.docx

Introduction:
A professional development plan brings out how successfully a person has been able to achieve
what he has wanted and how the skills that he had and acquired through the scope of...

This question was asked on Mar 30, 2013 and answered on Apr 01, 2013.

Recently Asked Questions

Why Join Course Hero?

Course Hero has all the homework and study help you need to succeed! We’ve got course-specific notes, study guides, and practice tests along with expert tutors and customizable flashcards—available anywhere, anytime.

-

Educational Resources
  • -

    Study Documents

    Find the best study resources around, tagged to your specific courses. Share your own to gain free Course Hero access or to earn money with our Marketplace.

    Browse Documents
  • -

    Question & Answers

    Get one-on-one homework help from our expert tutors—available online 24/7. Ask your own questions or browse existing Q&A threads. Satisfaction guaranteed!

    Ask a Question
  • -

    Flashcards

    Browse existing sets or create your own using our digital flashcard system. A simple yet effective studying tool to help you earn the grade that you want!

    Browse Flashcards