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Developing a Thesis Objective In this lesson, you'll learn how to develop a thesis sentence that guides your reader and strengthens your writing.

I asked you to read "The Hazards of Movie Going" and gave you both a sample paragraph on the subject and a sample essay.

I have added a handout: Developing a Thesis, which includes exercises for you to complete. It's simple enough. I am asking that you read the sample paragraph and essay to determine what goes into the writing of each.

Then, I am asking you to read the second handout on developing thesis statements. The exercises ask you to critically assess your diagnostic paper to determine how you could improve it. You do not have to rewrite your paper. You will be graded on your own critique. Show me what you have learned.
Developing a Thesis Objective In this lesson, you'll learn how to develop a thesis sentence that guides your reader and strengthens your writing. What Is a Thesis? All writing, no matter what form it takes, has a primary topic. In a college or high school situation, most professors agree that in a well-developed academic essay, this primary topic should be expressed in a thesis sentence. A thesis is a statement that: Makes a claim that can be supported by a reason or reasons; Unifies the paper by stating the writer's most important or significant point regarding the topic; Is comprised of one sentence that does not diverge into many topics; Forecasts the content of the essay; Is placed most often in the beginning of the essay, usually within the first or second paragraph; and Is sometimes implied rather than stated outright. In this lesson, we'll focus on examining what a thesis is, how it works, and how you can develop a strong thesis that unifies your work. Before You Develop a Thesis It's important to recognize that most writers do not have a clear thesis sentence as they begin their essay drafting. As you write, often you'll begin to see your own thoughts develop. You'll begin to understand your own ideas, points, and direction more clearly. If you are using research, your reading and experiences become new discoveries that may lead to changing your original direction. Or, after a peer review or feedback received from your instructor, you may find that more important or intriguing issues exist on which to focus your paper. Whatever the case, you should know that you might not have a clear thesis sentence until you have finished your first or second draft. Sometimes, this clearer thesis reveals itself at the very end of an early draft-look for it in your conclusion section. If your "new" thesis suggests itself in an early draft, revise that draft with the new thesis in mind, making sure that all of your points in the essay support your clearer thesis. Often experienced writers will develop a "working thesis" as they write first and second drafts. Then, as the writing approaches its final stages, they develop a finalized thesis that accurately and clearly reflects their main points. Learning to be flexible about your paper's thesis is part of practicing a strong writing process. The Major Components of a Thesis The thesis statement usually is not an announcement that begins, "This paper
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is about XYZ." In a polished essay, the thesis will make a claim about the topic. A claim asserts a position, point of view, or belief. So, let's suppose that you have to write a paper about the differences between college and high school. In this paper, the earliest version of your thesis might begin something like this: College is very different from high school. Here you can see that this basic sentence makes a firm statement, or claim. There is no need to qualify the statement by saying, "This paper is about how college is very different from high school." Your reader will know that. While the statement "College is very different from high school" is a good start, it is not yet a fully developed thesis. Besides making a claim, a thesis must be supportable by a reason or reasons. So when you begin drafting your thesis, ask yourself: Why is college different from high school? What makes college different from high school? You can think of these types of questions as the "so what?" test. After looking at your early thesis, ask yourself "so what?" So what does this statement mean to me? So what does this mean to my readers? So what does this change or affect? If you can come up with a number of reasons here, you are well on your way to developing not only a thesis, but also an organizational structure for your essay. In your paper about the differences between college and high school, you might continue developing the thesis in this way: College is very different from high school, because it requires that students have and use more self-discipline than they did in high school. Here, you can see that this thesis statement has integrated some reasons why college is different from high school. In writing this paper, you would follow through on your thesis by talking about how college students "have and use more self-discipline than they did in high school." This addition to the thesis sentence unifies the topic of the paper with what you, the writer, sees as its most significant point. This final sentence: Makes a claim that can be supported by a reason or reasons; Unifies the paper by stating the writer's most important or significant point regarding the topic; and Is comprised of one sentence that does not diverge into many topics. The true test of a good thesis is whether the paper and the thesis are making the same point. In this example, your paper should introduce and discuss several ways that high school did not require the degree of self-discipline that college does. You should use examples and supportive details to provide insight into both the high school and college situation. The thesis and support that develops the thesis depend a lot on the audience (reader/s) and purpose (nature of the assignment or what you want to
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Five Paragraph Essay Sample The Hazards of Moviegoing Introductory paragraph (Hook) (Thesis) (Blueprint) I am a movie fanatic. When friends want to know what picture won the Oscar in 1980 or who played the police chief in Jaws, they ask me . My friends, though, have stopped asking me if I want to go out to the movies. I have decided that the idea of going to the movie theater to see a movie is overrated, so I’ve quit going. The problems in getting to the theater, the theater itself, and the behavior of some patrons are all reasons why I often wait for a movie to show up on TV. First supporting paragraph First of all, just getting to the theater presents difficulties. Leaving a home equipped with a TV and a video recorder isn't an attractive idea on a humid, cold, or rainy night. Even if the weather cooperates, there is still a thirty-minute drive to the theater down a congested highway, followed by the hassle of looking for a parking space. And then there are the lines. After hooking yourself to the end of a human chain, you worry about whether there will be enough tickets, whether you will get seats together, and whether many people will sneak into the line ahead of you. Second supporting paragraph Once you have made it to the box office and gotten your tickets, you are confronted with the problems of the theater itself. If you are in one of the run-down older theaters, you must adjust to the musty smell of seldom-cleaned carpets. Escaped springs lurk in the faded plush or cracked leather seats, and half the seats you sit in seem loose or tilted so that you sit at a strange angle. The newer twin and quad theaters offer their own problems. Sitting in an area only one-quarter the size of a regular theater, moviegoers often have to put up with the sound of the movie next door. This is especially jarring when the other movie involves racing cars or a karate war and you are trying to enjoy a quiet love story. And whether the theater is old or new, it will have floors that seem to be coated with rubber cement. By the end of a movie, shoes almost have to be pried off the floor because they have become sealed to a deadly compound of spilled soda, hardening bubble gum, and crushed Ju-Jubes. Third supporting paragraph Some of the patrons are even more of a problem than the theater itself. Little kids race up and down the aisles, usually in giggling packs. Teenagers try to impress their friends by talking back to the screen, whistling, and making what they consider to be hilarious noises. Adults act as if they were at home in their own living rooms and comment loudly on the ages of the stars or why movies aren't as good anymore. And people of all ages crinkle candy wrappers, stick gum on their seats, and drop popcorn tubs or cups of crushed ice and soda on the floor. They also cough and burp, squirm endlessly in their seats, file out for repeated trips to the rest rooms or concession stand, and elbow you out of the armrest on either side of your seat. Concluding paragraph (Reworded Thesis) (Summary) (Clincher) After arriving home from the movies one night, I decided that I was not going to be a moviegoer anymore . I was tired of the problems involved in getting to the movies and dealing with the theater itself and some of the patrons . The next day I arranged to have cable TV service installed in my home. I may now see movies a bit later than other people, but I'll be more relaxed watching box office hits in the comfort of my own living room.
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Print this out- it will serve as a great reference for you during this course. Hook The purpose of this sentence is to grab the reader’s attention—why should they read this piece of writing? An effective gimmick often used is to begin with a question which leads into your thesis sentence (this may take 1 or 2 sentences). Thesis This sentence is the very essence, the heart of your five-paragraph essay. It is a sentence that states your main idea or belief, which you are to prove and support when writing your essay Introductory Paragraph (1) Blueprint This is a rough plan or overview of the specific topics you are going to talk about to support your thesis (this is the source of your topic sentences). After the ” introduction”, you will create several new paragraphs—what is known as the “body” of the essay. The purpose of the body is to provide the information which explains/supports your thesis sentence. Topic Sentence This sentence will include one important aspect of your thesis sentence. Make it interesting! Specific Support This sentence will give a specific example which validates (proves, supports, etc.) the topic sentence for THIS paragraph. Specific Support This sentence will give a different specific example validating the topic sentence for THIS paragraph. First Body Paragraph (2) Specific Support This sentence will give a yet one more specific example—different from the last two! -- validating the topic sentence for THIS paragraph. Topic Sentence This sentence will begin your third overall paragraph—following the introduction and first “body” paragraph. This sentence will include a DIFFERENT important aspect of your thesis sentence. Specific Support This sentence will give a specific example which validates (proves, supports, etc.) the topic sentence for THIS paragraph. Specific Support This sentence will give a different specific example validating the topic sentence for THIS paragraph. Second Body Paragraph (3) Specific Support This sentence will give a yet one more specific example—different from the last two! -- validating the topic sentence for THIS paragraph. Topic Sentence If you are asked to write a 5 paragraph essay, this sentence will begin your final “body” paragraph. You will again create a sentence using a final point that was part of your initial blueprint sentence. Specific Support This sentence will give a specific example which validates (proves, supports, etc.) the topic sentence for THIS paragraph. Specific Support This sentence will give a different specific example validating the topic sentence for THIS paragraph. Third Body Paragraph (4) Specific Support This sentence will give a yet one more specific example—different from the last two! -- validating the topic sentence for THIS paragraph. The final paragraph is always the “conclusion” . The sentences can be in any order. This paragraph should briefly summarize what you wrote in your essay, but should NOT contain any new ideas, evidence, etc. . Reworded Thesis This sentence is almost identical to your thesis, just said in a different way so as not to be repetitive. Summary This is where you summarize your essay and how it applies to your thesis (this may take 1 or 2 sentences). Concluding Paragraph (5) Clincher This is where you state your opinion, prediction, etc. which is based on the information found in the rest of the essay, basically personalizing your findings (this may take 1 or 2 sentences). The introductory paragraph sentences can be in any order. **Be sure to insert appropriate transitions— both words and sentences, as needed —in order to ensure that the ideas “flow."
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Short Essay and Outline "The Hazards of Movie Going" One Paragraph Essay Sample The Hazards of Movie Going By John Langan From College Writing Skills with Readings Introduction/Thesis Although I love movies, going to see them drives me slightly crazy. Body First of all, getting to the movie can take a lot of time. I have a thirty five-minute drive down a congested highway. Then, with a popular film, I usually have to wait in a long line at the ticket booth. Another problem is that the theater itself is seldom a pleasant place to be. A musty smell suggests that there has been no fresh air in the theater since it was built. Half the seats seem to be failing apart. And the floor often has a sticky coating that gets on your shoes. The worst problem of all is some of the other moviegoers. Kids run up and down the aisle. Teenagers laugh and shout at the screen. People of all ages loudly drop soda cups and popcorn tubs, cough and burp, and elbow you out of the armrest on either side of your seat. Conclusion All in all, I would rather stay home and wait for the latest movie hits to appear on TV in the safety and comfort of my own living room. Outline for an One-Paragraph Essay I. Introduction: A. Thesis Statement: _______________________ II. Body: A. First Supporting Idea (Topic Sentence): _______________________ A.1. _______________________ A.2. _______________________ B. Second Supporting Idea (Topic Sentence): _______________________ B.1. _______________________ B.2. _______________________
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B.3. _______________________ C. Third Supporting Idea (Topic Sentence): _______________________ C.1. _______________________ C.2. _______________________ C.3. _______________________ III. Conclusion A. Restate topic: _______________________ Sample Outline for a One-Paragraph Essay This is in relation to "The Hazards of Movie Going" (the paragraph) I. Introduction: A. Thesis Statement : I love going to the movies but there are problems going there. II. Body: A. First Supporting Idea (Topic Sentence) : Time getting there A.1. long drive A.2. long lines B. Second Supporting Idea (Topic Sentence) : The theater B.1. smelly B.2. broken seat B.3. sticky floor C. Third Supporting Idea (Topic Sentence) : Other moviegoers C.1. kids running C.2. noisy teenagers C.3. people of all ages C.3.a. makes noises dropping cups and popcorn tubs C.3.b. cough and burp C.3.c. elbowing one another III. Conclusion A. Restate topic : I prefer staying at home where it is comfortable and safe.
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Thesis Report on.docx

Thesis Report on “The Hazards of movie Going”.
“Theatrical movie dreadful to deal”
I have been a great fanatic of movie once. My friends relied upon me
for knowing the facts regarding Oscar...

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