View the step-by-step solution to:

One reason determining culpability is difficult is that a person may have a basic understanding that an action is wrong yet this understanding may be...

One reason determining culpability is difficult is that a person may have a basic understanding that an action is wrong yet this understanding may be so overlaid with self-deception and rationalization —“I had no alternative . . . honor demanded it . . . he deserved it . . . no one was really hurt by what I did”— that the person’s understanding becomes inoperative. Moreover, the process of self-deception and rationalization may be so habitual that the person performs it mindlessly, without giving thought to what he or she is doing. Is it reasonable to regard self-deception, rationalization, and the habit of mindless behavior as moral failings ? Why or why not?


Please, the answer should not be longer than one paragraph

Top Answer

Science, incidentally, not only ignores the question of indwelling “essences” by looking instead at measurable... View the full answer

Sign up to view the full answer

Why Join Course Hero?

Course Hero has all the homework and study help you need to succeed! We’ve got course-specific notes, study guides, and practice tests along with expert tutors.

-

Educational Resources
  • -

    Study Documents

    Find the best study resources around, tagged to your specific courses. Share your own to gain free Course Hero access.

    Browse Documents
  • -

    Question & Answers

    Get one-on-one homework help from our expert tutors—available online 24/7. Ask your own questions or browse existing Q&A threads. Satisfaction guaranteed!

    Ask a Question
Ask a homework question - tutors are online