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PHIL-205-20: Historical Introduction to Ethics. Spring, 2016 Mon/Wed/Fri, 1:102 p. Case Beracha Hall 221 email: [email protected] Availability by...

Please help me on the Philosophy ethics term paper. Thanks. It requires at least 4 resources and 5 PAGES. There're already two resources stated in the outline. And you need additional two resources from the same author stated in the following documents (It could be the same author as in the outline). I have attached the documents you need. The paper has to be done based on the outline and  with the same author stated in any of those files.

PHIL-205-20: Historical Introduction to Ethics. Spring, 2016                                                                                                           Mon/Wed/Fri, 1:10-2 p.m.                                                                                                  Dr. Case    Beracha Hall 221                          e-mail:  [email protected]   Availability  by appointment: If you don't have an appointment, just meet with me after this class. If you have a class  immediately after this one, I am likely to be in the Adorjan Hall 1 st  floor common area from 11:25-11:55.    Brief Course Description This course is designed to engender critical thinking skills that should prove useful in all areas of life, as well as  familiarize the student with the various enduring questions that have arisen from the most prominent thinkers in the  history of ethics, or ‘moral philosophy,’ and some of the responses they have provided in answer to them. Required Books:  I used to require no books, as most readings are uploaded to Blackboard and E-Reserve.  However, after discovering how much better those students did who purchased a copy of Christopher Lutz's  Reading  Alasdair MacIntyre's After Virtue , I decided to require it. It is less than $25 and the only book for the course, so please  purchase it before we begin reading MacIntyre. Recommended Books:  Although none of these texts are required, I highly recommend purchasing the following  books, which can be acquired inexpensively through www.bookfinder.com: Alasdair MacIntyre,  After Virtue: A Study in Moral Theory . University of Notre Dame Press. ISBN: 0268006113.  Although several chapters of this book are already posted on E-reserve and Blackboard, anyone serious about ethics  beyond merely satisfying a college requirement should read this whole book. There are copies of the second edition  paperback available on Amazon for less than $3 at the time I write this.  Alasdair MacIntyre,  Whose Justice, Which Rationality?  University of Notre Dame Press. ISBN: 0268019444. This is the sequel to  After Virtue , in which MacIntyre provides further historical justification for his ethical thesis. Alasdair MacIntyre,  Three Rival Versions of Moral Enquiry . Univ. of Notre Dame Press. ISBN: 0268018774.   The conclusion to the  After Virtue  trilogy. Required Readings Daily reading assignments are listed on this syllabus, & are to be read  prior to  the date on which they appear. The  date on which each reading assignment is listed is the day by which you are expected to have already read it, & during  which you are expected to be ready to discuss it with all of us in class. So, look ahead to the next class meeting date for  each day’s reading assignment. Additionally, because I prefer students to listen, think, ask questions & respond in class,  rather than waste time dictating my words like a stenographer,  class lecture notes are posted on Blackboard, & I expect students to read them before class, as well, & bring a printed copy of them to class , so that they can have them  without having to sacrifice class participation to copious note-taking. The exams will consist of information from these  notes, so reading them & asking questions about their contents, as well as those of the primary source reading assignment, will prepare you well for these important tests. I would suggest that students begin right away answering the study guide  questions, posted on Blackboard, as they pertain to each daily reading, & that they print them out & bring them with the  rest of their materials to class each day. In addition to the required readings & main course notes, I will occasionally  provide ‘suggested readings’ on Blackboard, which will not be mandatory, but which may prove helpful to those having  trouble understanding the material, or which may enable those who already understand the required material to pursue the  topic further. None of this is meant to discourage taking additional notes, for clarification or to document additional  questions & ideas that arise in class, but simply to free up students to engage in philosophical dialogue in the class. 1
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Moral and non-moral issue Ethics being the science of morality should be able to give an expository analysis of moral actions and non-moral actions. Moral actions are those existing within the moral sphere and are for that matter, objects of moral judgments (Macintyre, 2010). They are different from non-moral actions since non-moral actions are devoid of any moral quality and are for that matter excluded from the moral judgment scope. In a wider sense, moral means that moral quality (goodness or badness, rightness or wrongness) is present. In this sense, moral issue is opposed to non-moral issue. Morality is NOT subjective. Morals are based on moral theories. Moral theory determines people's moral values Moral issues are the hallmark of an educated and civilized society. Moral values are the products of higher, finer intellect of advanced race as well as the highest level of perfection that human beings are capable of. Moral values foster progression of a society. Non-moral issues ARE subjective. Non-moral values are the hallmarks of a barbaric society. The situations of non-moral issues are short lived and cannot make any lasting impression on human race. There is no value of fine arts or education on non-moral issues. A non-moral issue only involves individual indulgency in human cardinal pleasures. Non-moral values are associated with a society doomed to defeat and failure since it advances the digression of the society. Works Cited Macintyre, B. (2010). Operation mincemeat: The true spy store that changed the course of World War II . MacIntyre, A. C. (2013). After virtue: A study in moral theory . London: Bloomsbury.
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PHIL-205-20: Historical Introduction to Ethics. Spring, 2016                                                                                                           Mon/Wed/Fri, 1:10-2 p.m.                                                                                                  Dr. Case    Beracha Hall 221                          e-mail:  [email protected]   Availability  by appointment: If you don't have an appointment, just meet with me after this class. If you have a class  immediately after this one, I am likely to be in the Adorjan Hall 1 st  floor common area from 11:25-11:55.    Brief Course Description This course is designed to engender critical thinking skills that should prove useful in all areas of life, as well as  familiarize the student with the various enduring questions that have arisen from the most prominent thinkers in the  history of ethics, or ‘moral philosophy,’ and some of the responses they have provided in answer to them. Required Books:  I used to require no books, as most readings are uploaded to Blackboard and E-Reserve.  However, after discovering how much better those students did who purchased a copy of Christopher Lutz's  Reading  Alasdair MacIntyre's After Virtue , I decided to require it. It is less than $25 and the only book for the course, so please  purchase it before we begin reading MacIntyre. Recommended Books : Although none of these texts are required, I highly recommend purchasing the following books, which can be acquired inexpensively through www.bookfinder.com: Alasdair MacIntyre,  After Virtue: A Study in Moral Theory . University of Notre Dame Press. ISBN: 0268006113.  Although several chapters of this book are already posted on E-reserve and Blackboard, anyone serious about ethics  beyond merely satisfying a college requirement should read this whole book. There are copies of the second edition  paperback available on Amazon for less than $3 at the time I write this.  Alasdair MacIntyre,  Whose Justice, Which Rationality?  University of Notre Dame Press. ISBN: 0268019444. This is the sequel to  After Virtue , in which MacIntyre provides further historical justification for his ethical thesis. Alasdair MacIntyre,  Three Rival Versions of Moral Enquiry . Univ. of Notre Dame Press. ISBN: 0268018774.   The conclusion to the  After Virtue  trilogy. Required Readings Daily reading assignments are listed on this syllabus, & are to be read  prior to  the date on which they appear. The  date on which each reading assignment is listed is the day by which you are expected to have already read it, & during  which you are expected to be ready to discuss it with all of us in class. So, look ahead to the next class meeting date for  each day’s reading assignment. Additionally, because I prefer students to listen, think, ask questions & respond in class,  rather than waste time dictating my words like a stenographer,  class lecture notes are posted on Blackboard, & I expect students to read them before class, as well, & bring a printed copy of them to class , so that they can have them  without having to sacrifice class participation to copious note-taking. The exams will consist of information from these  notes, so reading them & asking questions about their contents, as well as those of the primary source reading assignment, will prepare you well for these important tests. I would suggest that students begin right away answering the study guide  questions, posted on Blackboard, as they pertain to each daily reading, & that they print them out & bring them with the  rest of their materials to class each day. In addition to the required readings & main course notes, I will occasionally  provide ‘suggested readings’ on Blackboard, which will not be mandatory, but which may prove helpful to those having  trouble understanding the material, or which may enable those who already understand the required material to pursue the  topic further. None of this is meant to discourage taking additional notes, for clarification or to document additional  questions & ideas that arise in class, but simply to free up students to engage in philosophical dialogue in the class. 1
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Daily reading assignments are listed on this syllabus, & are to be read  prior to  the date on which they appear. The  date on which each reading assignment is listed is the day by which you are expected to have already read it, & during  which you are expected to be ready to discuss it with all of us in class. So, look ahead to the next class meeting date for  each day’s reading assignment. Additionally, because I prefer students to listen, think, ask questions & respond in class,  rather than waste time dictating my words like a stenographer,  class lecture notes are posted on Blackboard, & I expect students to read them before class, as well, & bring a printed copy of them to class , so that they can have them  without having to sacrifice class participation to copious note-taking. The exams will consist of information from these  notes, so reading them & asking questions about their contents, as well as those of the primary source reading assignment, will prepare you well for these important tests. I would suggest that students begin right away answering the study guide  questions, posted on Blackboard, as they pertain to each daily reading, & that they print them out & bring them with the  rest of their materials to class each day. In addition to the required readings & main course notes, I will occasionally  provide ‘suggested readings’ on Blackboard, which will not be mandatory, but which may prove helpful to those having  trouble understanding the material, or which may enable those who already understand the required material to pursue the  topic further. None of this is meant to discourage taking additional notes, for clarification or to document additional  questions & ideas that arise in class, but simply to free up students to engage in philosophical dialogue in the class. Attendance & class participation Obviously, it is difficult to participate in class if you are not present, & frequent absences are detrimental not only to your own ability to learn from my lectures & the class discussions, but also to our ability to learn from you.  Philosophical instruction relies upon dialogue, & participation is essential. While I will not waste class time calling  attendance every period, I will both pass around an  attendance sheet  daily, as well as periodically call on students from a  randomly shuffled deck of index  cards  with each student’s name in it, in order to remain arbitrarily fair in allowing  everyone a chance to share what they have learned from the text with the rest of the class. If the student in question is not  present when their card is picked, participation points will be deducted. For those of you who are shy or have difficulties  with public speaking, there is an ‘ online dialogs ’ section on Blackboard, in which you can make up for a lack of public  class participation, if necessary, by posting pertinent questions or answers online. For those with sufficient classroom  participation, this online forum can be utilized for extra-credit. That stated, attendance & participation are rewarded with  participation points , & if I get enough volunteer participation, I’ll have no need to use the cards. If both a lack of  volunteer participation & poor answers to questions by those whose names are picked in the deck occurs, I will get the  impression that people aren’t reading the assigned readings & I’ll initiate a  pop quiz . As always,  turn off the ringers on  your cellular phones  before class begins. If an emergency requires that you be absent, you must contact me by the next class period with a reasonable excuse if you want to avoid an unexcused absence. Send your reasons to me via Blackboard e-mail with the subject heading, ‘Absence.’ If e-mail is inconvenient, call the philosophy department, & the secretary will record the details of your call, & give them to me for you. If the emergency in question inhibits you from contacting me by the next class period, I will expect some documentation to account for your absence (i.e. a doctor’s note) when you return. More than three unexcused absences will result in a drop of one letter grade, & anyone with more than seven unexcused absences will fail the course. Regarding e-mail, DO NOT e-mail me merely because you don’t feel like talking to me before or after class . Before the days of e-mail, students did not write letters constantly to their professors in order to avoid the necessary responsibility of consulting their professors vocally with questions, & I will not allow bad student habits arising from technologically-oriented lifestyles to burden me with hours of daily e-mail. Only e-mail me if you have an emergency. Any other questions should be asked before or after class, or you should make an appointment to meet with me if your question requires more time. Don’t e-mail me about problems with Blackboard. The Blackboard assistance line is 977-2252. Assignments & Grading Grading Scale  A 93-100%, A- 90-92, B+ 87-89, B 83-86, B- 80-82, C+ 77-79, C 73-76, C- 70-72, D 60-69, F 59 & less 2
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