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Page 1 of 4 Name: Highlight this text and enter your name here Week 2 Lab Worksheet SCI214 - Integrated Science Lab 2: Circular Motion Instructions...

Instructions
Circular motion is one of the fundamental building blocks for understanding the physical world because it is so common. In reading the Tillery text, you’ve explored the notion that the revolutionary movement of an object around a central body is the result of a combination of forces. Objects tend to travel in a straight line path but they can also be deflected from that path by a central body. The force that pulls the object out of that straight-line motion is called centripetal force. In the mean time the orbiting object is exerting an equal and opposite force such that if the connection between the two bodies were blocked, the smaller object would continue to travel in a straight line direction away from the central body; although not necessarily the same direction as before. We call is centrifugal reaction. Tillery describes this orbiting system in terms of inertia, mass, and acceleration. This interactive lets you examine these basic ideas and adds two new ideas to the mix; angular displacement and angular velocity (See lab overview for directions)
In this experiment you will be examining an object orbiting around a central body where the radius of the orbit is 1.0 meter. The goals of this experiment are to explore the nature of the relationships between mass, acceleration, force, and time.

Prelab Questions (2 points each)

Answer the following four questions with as much detail. Enter your response in the box below the question. Please complete these questions before conducting the experiment.
Question 1: What does your reading of Tillery tell you about the nature of the relationship between velocity, acceleration, mass and force?

Response to Question 1


Question 2: How do you plan on designing this experiment using the features on the Applet to explore these relationships?

Response to Question 2

Data Table (16 points)

Exp no Velocity (m/sec) Mass (Kg) Acceleration (m/sce2) Force (Newtons) Time (sec) Angular displacement (2rad)1 Angular velocity ( = 2rad  t )2 Linear Velocity (=d/t)3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1angular displacement is the distance traveled in one revolution. The units are in rad.2 Angular velocity, , is the change in rotation, and t is the time it takes to go through that rotation. The units are in rad/sec. 3Linear velocity is measured in meters/sec


Data Analysis (12 points)
How would you interpret the above results? Be specific. Do your results conform to what you read about circular motion in the Tillery text? Explain.



Post Lab Questions (2 points each)

Answer the following five questions with as much detail as possible. Enter your response in the box below the question.


Question 3: While this simulation allows you to explore the nature of the relationships between velocity, force, and acceleration, what important issues are being ignored?

Response to Question 3




Instructions for questions 4-6: Follow the next set of instructions and answer the multiple-choice questions below highlighting and embolding the most correct answer choice.

1. After the interactive loads, deselect the VELOCITY, ACCELERATION, and FORCE vectors, and the VELOCITY X, and VELOCITY Y graphs.
2. Reduce the VELOCITY of the mass to 0.5 m/s and the MASS to 1.5 kg.

Question 4: In what direction does the force of the mass point?

A) Always to the left.
B) Always to the right.
C) Always to upward.
D) Always to downward.
E) Always away from the center of the circular path.
F) Always toward the center of the circular path.

Question 5: In what direction does the velocity of the mass point?

A) Always to the left.
B) Always to the right.
C) Always to upward.
D) Always to downward.
E) Always away from the center of the circular path.
F) Always toward the center of the circular path.
G) Always perpendicular to the force.

Question 6: In what direction does the acceleration of the mass point?

A) Always away from the center of the circular path.
B) Always toward the center of the circular path.
C) Always perpendicular to the force.
D) Always in the opposite direction of the force.

Page  1  of  4 Name:   Highlight this text and enter your name here Week 2 Lab Worksheet SCI214 – Integrated Science Lab 2: Circular Motion Instructions Circular   motion   is   one   of   the   fundamental   building   blocks   for  understanding the physical world because it is so common. In  reading   the   Tillery   text,   you’ve   explored   the   notion   that   the  revolutionary movement of an object around a central body is the  result of a combination of forces.   Objects tend to travel in a  straight line path but they can also be deflected from that path by a  central body. The force that pulls the object out of that straight-line motion is called centripetal force.  In the  mean time the orbiting object is exerting an equal and opposite force such that if the connection between  the two bodies were blocked, the smaller object would continue to travel in a straight line direction away  from the central body; although not necessarily the same direction as before. We call is centrifugal reaction.  Tillery describes this orbiting system in terms of inertia, mass, and acceleration. This interactive lets you  examine these basic ideas and adds two new ideas to the mix; angular displacement and angular velocity  (See lab overview for directions) In this experiment you will be examining an object orbiting around a central body where the radius of the  orbit is 1.0 meter. The goals of this experiment are to explore the nature of the relationships between mass,  acceleration, force, and time.  Prelab Questions (2 points each) Answer the following four questions with as much detail. Enter your response in the box below the   question. Please complete these questions before conducting the experiment. Question 1:   What does your reading of Tillery tell you about the nature of the relationship between velocity,  acceleration, mass and force? Response to Question 1 Question 2:  How do you plan on designing this experiment using the features on the Applet to explore  these relationships?
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Page  2  of  4 Response to Question 2 Data Table (16 points) Exp  no Velocity  (m/sec) Mass  (Kg) Acceleration  (m/sce 2 ) Force  (Newtons) Time  (sec)  Angular  displacement  (2 π rad) 1 Angular velocity  ( ϖ  = 2 π rad   t ) 2 Linear Velocity  ( υ = d/ t) 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 angular displacement is the distance traveled in one revolution.   The units are in rad. 2   Angular velocity,   θ , is the  change in rotation, and t is the time it takes to go through that rotation. The units are in rad/sec.  3 Linear velocity is  measured in meters/sec Data Analysis (12 points) How would you interpret the above results? Be specific.   Do your results conform to what you read   about circular motion in the Tillery text? Explain. Post Lab Questions (2 points each) Answer the following five questions with as much detail as possible. Enter your response in the box   below the question.   
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