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Conflict Theory Perspective Capitalist economy causes inequality, conflict and revolutionary change in the superstructure. Use any of the underlined...
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What social institution does college fit within? What is your current status within this institution?

  1. What is one manifest function of college? Is it functioning adequately? How do you know?
  2. What is one way that colleges promote inequality? Explain how this occurs using examples from chapter 1.
  3. Describe a course where you had difficulty learning and eventually succeeded in the course. What symbols and meanings were confusing to you in the course? How did you learn the symbols and their meanings?
  4. Which modern theory were you using in question 2? How do you know this is the theory?
  5. Which modern theory were you using in question 3? How do you know?
  6. Which modern theory were you using in question 4? How do you know?

ConflictDiagram (1).pdfFunctions of Institutions Chart (1).pdfSymbInterDiagram.pdf

ConflictDiagram (1).pdf
Conflict Theory Perspective
Capitalist economy causes inequality, conflict and revolutionary change in the superstructure.
Use any of the underlined concepts in your reports. social
capital Civil Superstructure:
culture, media,
education, family,
religion Political Superstructure:
government, military,
police Hegemony = power by
consent power by force Coercion = cultural
capital Economic Base
Private property: land, raw materials, tools, machines,
factories, capital, commodities...
Relationships between people with different statuses in
economy determine relationships in other institutions:
powerful - powerless
bourgeoisie - proletariat
master - slave
men - women
Financial Power social
capital financial
capital Social Relationships according to Conflict Perspectives
Use any of the underlined concepts in your reports.
Groups by
social statuses Economic causes of conflict Civil, Political causes of conflict Responses to Domination 1%
vs.
99% Domination due to structure of economy
– capitalism causes conflict by creating
inequality, alienation from work, high
cost of living, healthcare, higher ed White
vs.
Indian, Black,
Asian, Latino Domination due to structure of economy
– land acquisition, chattel slavery, sharecropping, dual labor markets,
discrimination in pay scales,
gentrification, red-lining Hegemony (soft power) produced by
media outlets, owned by corporations
Persuade masses to vote for interests
of 1% instead of 99%
Culture promotes consumerism
racialization
institutional racism (Jim Crowe laws,
voting restrictions)
stereotype threat Men
vs.
Women Domination due to structure of economy
– corporations favor men as business
owners, workers, leaders patriarchy places men as “head of
household”
sexism occurs in laws, voting patterns
sexual harassment & discrimination U.S. Citizens
vs.
Immigrants Domination due to structure of economy
– businesses hire least expensive workers
and encourage workers to immigrate Ethnocentrism, laws that limit
immigration from specific nations
Prejudice, discrimination
Deportation, build a wall on boarder Younger, Ablebodied
vs.
Older or Disabled Domination due to structure of economy
– businesses want most efficient, lowcost, productive workers with knowledge
of new technology and least cost to
accommodate
Domination due to structure of economy
– criminal justice system supports
interests of businesses, security and
prisons are being privatized prejudice about age & ability
assuming youth have tech skills
assuming disabled people are
ineffective Collective actions change econ., gov’t.
welfare state, socialism, communism
altruism or charity, resistance (violent
or non-violent), acceptance &
assimilation, free-rider problem
double-consciousness
Civil Rights Movement
Intersectionality perspective
anti-racist collective actions
File legal complaint about
discrimination
Feminism, Women’s Movement
intersectionality perspective
consciousness raising
File legal complaint about
discrimination
Crossing boarder without
documentation or purchasing false
documentation
Collective actions (Farm Workers
Union)
American with Disabilities Act
Learn new technology or career
Take a pay cut
File legal complaint about
discrimination
Obey, submit, follow orders
Resist violently or nonviolently
Collective action (Black Lives Matter)
File legal complaint about
discrimination Police
vs.
Citizens Police function with coercion, threat
of physical force (hard power) with
personal discretion
Profiling by race, gender, class…
Cultures of deviance, violence
Functions of Institutions Chart (1).pdf
Functionalist Perspective
Social Institutions
Kinship Group/Family
Monogamy = 1 partner
Polygamy = 1 + partners
Patrilineal = father’s line
Matrilineal = mother’s line
Endogamy = Forms &
Organizations
Nuclear, Extended,
Single-parent,
Blended family,
Bi-nuclear,
Same-sex parents,
Singlehood,
Cohabitation Exogamy = Individual
Statuses
Mother, Father,
Grandparent,
Ancestor,
Child,
Step-brother/sister,
Cousin, Aunt, Uncle,
Fictive kin,
Other mother Functions of Institutions
Determines kinship within society
Regulates sexual norms, activity
Produces next generation
Performs the task of child rearing
In a nuclear structure, roles of men
and women complement each other
and provide models for children Polyandry = Nuclear family provides productive
workers and child nurturers to
replace parents Polygyny = Provide statuses for individuals Religion
Theism = Judaism, Islam,
Christianity, Hindu
Ethicalism = Buddhism,
Daoism
Animism = Totemism
Secularism =
Social movement =
Collective conscience = Education
Learning in a formal
social structure
Privately funded =
Publicly funded = Related Concepts Dysfunctions occur if needs not met. Sect, Cult, Synagogue,
Temple, Church,
Prayer Group,
Mosque,
Congregation,
Denomination,
Evangelicals,
Fundamentalists,
Megachurch Rabbi, Priest, Pope,
Bishop, Pastor,
Imam, Reverend,
Lay leader, Shaman
Believer, Faithful,
Evangelicals,
Fundamentalists,
Atheist, Agnostic Provides beliefs about supernatural School, College,
University, Daycare
Center, Workforce
Training Center, GED
program, ParentTeacher Org., School
Board Instructors/Faculty,
Student, Athlete,
Principal, Dean,
Administrative
staff, Adviser, Board
member, Coach,
Cheerleader, Parent Transmits knowledge from one
generation to the next Regulates human relationship to
supernatural, gives meaning to life
and death
Determines important values and
norms, acts as moral authority
Provides social cohesion by
strengthening collective conscience Socializes children into common
norms and values
Integrates immigrants and other
“outsiders” into a culture
Teaches skills and knowledge for
specific jobs or careers
Sort students into groups to prepare
for future careers and jobs Traditional family
Kinship networks
Pre-industrial family
Public sphere (men’s work)
Private sphere (women’s work)
Cult of domesticity
Baby boom
Gender factory
Domestic abuse
Miscegenation
Pecking order
Second shift
Matriarchy
Sacred, Profane
Denomination, Congregation
Opiate of the masses
Protestant ethic, Predestination
Pluralism, Sacred canopy
Religious experience
Reflexive spirituality
Supernatural compensators
Commercialization of holy days
Hidden curriculum
Social capital
Cultural capital
Tracking
Credentialism
Meritocracy
Affirmative Action
Stereotype threat
Achievement gap
Vouchers Functionalist Perspective
Social Institutions
Medicine/Healthcare
Treatment = prevent &
cure disease, alleviate
pain
Research = scientifically
develop treatment
Healthcare Systems =
Employer-based system
Fee-for-service model
Health Maintenance Org.
Single-payer system Authority & State
State = community that
claims legitimate use of
force within a territory
Politics = Power relations
Legitimate authority =
justifiable right to rule
(charismatic, traditional,
legal-rational)
Paradox of authority Economy
Feudalism, Capitalism,
Socialism, Communism
Service sector
Private = business owned
by an individual or
corporation
Public = agency or
organization owned by a
government, collective Forms &
Organizations Individual
Statuses Functions of Institutions Hospital, Clinic,
Insurance Comp.,
Pharmaceutical
Comp.,
Psychiatric treatment
facility,
American Medical
Association,
Centers for Disease
Control,
National Institute of
Health, CHIP Physician, Nurse,
Nurse Practitioner,
Researcher,
Psychiatrist,
Dentist,
Medical Technician,
Mid-wife,
Chiropractor,
Patient, Client Organizes and provides healthcare
products and services for members
of society Nation, Legislature,
Executive branch,
Judiciary, Agency,
Interest groups,
Police, Prison,
Public School,
Welfare State,
Political party,
Democracy,
Dictatorship,
International state
system
Corporation, Business,
Bank, School,
Consumer
organization,
Insurance company,
Hospital,
Credit bureau,
Cooperative,
Stock-market,
Charity, Post Office Political leader,
Citizen, Ruler,
Monarch, Judge,
Lawyer, Teacher,
Agent of IRS, FBI,
CIA, Mayor,
Representative,
Administrator,
Voter, Candidate Organizes and regulates the
legitimate use of power Stockholder,
Employer,
Employee,
Customer,
Consumer, Creditor,
Debtor, Inspector,
Administrator,
Manager, CEO, COO Organizes and regulates the
production and distribution of goods
and services through markets Related Concepts Dysfunctions occur if needs not met. Prevents spread of disease
Adopts scientific and technological
inventions to improve healthcare and
medication
Provides statuses for individuals in
various conditions of health Organizes decision-making for society
Establishes and enforces laws to
provide social control
Protects society from outsiders Provides basic necessities for life
Provides jobs, statuses, privileges to
individuals
Provides goods and services for other
institutions Medicalization
Biomedical culture
Sick role
Social construction of illness
Mortality, Morbidity
Epigenetic mark
Prenatal determinants of health
Postnatal determinants of health
Diagnostic psychiatry, DSM
Talk therapy, Drug therapy
Cause vs. Effect of poverty & health
Routinization, Rationalization
Bureaucracy, Specialization
Taylorism, Meritocracy
Obedience in Milgram experiment
Power, Domination, Coercion
Individual rights (citizenship, civil,
political, social)
3 dimensions of power, Soft power
Collective action problem
Public policy
Game theory
Altruism
Agricultural revolution
Industrial revolution
Profit, Standard of living
Alienation
Family wage
Globalization
Monopoly, Oligopoly
Productivity enhancing
Rent seeking
Offshoring
Union, Union busting
SymbInterDiagram.pdf
Symbolic-interactionism Perspective/Approach/Paradigm
Individuals learn ideas and
behaviors in the social
environment and culture. Socialization = Learner + Agent of Socialization
Social Interaction = Actions + Reactions
Individuals develop a social self,
according to Mead’s Stages:
Imitation
Play
Games Social Construction of Reality
Culture = Groups of
people construct
values and norms. Groups of people
construct statuses and
roles within groups. Groups of people create symbols and give them meaning.
Dramaturgical Theory =
individual performs their
“self” for others using
symbols and meanings of
the cultures in groups. Individual may adopt the symbols and meanings,
reject the symbols and/or meanings,
change symbols and/or meanings.

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