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12 Collective Behavior, Social Change, and Contemporary Society Tim Sloan/Staff/Getty Images Chapter Outline 12.1 Collective Behavior 12.2 Social...

Social Movements

Social movements can change the world. After reading Chapter 12 of the text, Sociology: Beyond Common Sense, and the article, Sociology and Social Movements, discuss the social movements that have been noted in the United States in the last decade. Moreover, discuss what implications those movements have had on today’s culture. Finally, hypothesize what current social movements could transform the future of the world.

Your initial post should be at least 250 words in length. Support your claims with examples from required material(s) and/or other scholarly resources, and properly cite any references. Respond to at least two of your classmates’ posts by Day 7.

Social Change

The future of the world is uncertain. In fact, there are those who predict a wonderful world where technology and creativity provide a good quality of life for most people, while others predict a world of competition, conflict, and strife. Read Chapter 12 of the text, Sociology: Beyond Common Sense, and the article, The Digital Divide and What to Do About It (attached)   .Then, watch the video Wade Davis: Dreams From Endangered Cultures. After reading and viewing the required resources, use the sociological theories provided in throughout the text to explain why these polar opposites could both occur, and what needs to happen for peace and prosperity to result.

Your initial post should be at least 250 words in length. Support your claims with examples from required material(s) and/or other scholarly resources, and properly cite any references.

 

12 Collective Behavior, Social Change, and Contemporary Society Tim Sloan/Staff/Getty Images Chapter Outline 12.1 Collective Behavior 12.2 Social Movements 12.3 Social Change 12.4 Theoretical Perspectives on Social Change 12.5 Modernization and Post-Industrial Society
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The Digital Divide and What To Do About It Eszter Hargittai papers-at-eszter-dot-com Sociology Department Princeton University This is a pre-print version of the book chapter to appear in the “New Economy Handbook” edited by Derek C. Jones. San Diego, CA: Academic Press. 2003. Please do not post this document on any Web sites or distribute it on any mailing lists. You can point people to its online location here: http://www.eszter.com/papers/c04-digitaldivide.html Thank you. Abstract In a society where knowledge-intensive activities are an increasingly important component of the economy, the distribution of knowledge across the population is increasingly linked to stratification. Much attention among both academic researchers and in policy circles has been paid to what segments of the population have access to the Internet or are Internet users. Although the medium has seen high rates of diffusion, its spread has been unequal both within and across nations. In this chapter, I look at (a) individual-level inequality in Internet access and use in the United States, (b) cross-national variation in connectedness, and (c) inequality from the side of content producers in gaining audiences for their material online. Outline I. Introduction II. Defining the “Digital Divide” III. From Digital Divide to Digital Inequality IV. Global Digital Inequality V. Inequality in Content Production and Distribution VI. Conclusion Acknowledgements Some of the material in this chapter draws on work with Paul DiMaggio to whom I am grateful for many discussions on the topic. I also thank the National Science Foundation (grant IIS0086143) and the Dan David Foundation for supporting this work.
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Eszter Hargittai The Digital Divide :: 2 Glossary Autonomy of Use: The freedom to use technologies when, where and how one wishes Digital Divide: The gap between those who have access to digital technologies and those who do not; or the gap between those who use digital technologies and those who do not understood in binary terms distinguishing the “haves” from the “have- nots” Digital Inequality: A refined understanding of the “digital divide” that emphasizes a spectrum of inequality across segments of the population depending on differences along several dimensions of technology access and use Online Skill: The ability to use the Internet effectively and efficiently Portal: a Web site that primarily presents itself as a one-stop point-of-entry site to the content of the Web Universal Service: Policy to ensure that everyone has affordable access to the telecommunications network
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Social movements
One of the most important social movements that have been noted in United States in the last
decade is the President itself, i.e. Mr. Barack Obama, The first black President of US....

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