Question: Consider a normal distribution of frog weights with = 500 grams and = 65 grams. A sample of size 2,000 is drawn from this population.
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Question:Consider a normal distribution of frog weights with

style="background-color:transparent;color:rgb(0,0,0);">μ = 500 grams and σ = 65 grams. A sample of size 2,000 is drawn from this population. Approximately how many of the 2,000 cases would you expect to find between 435 and 565?


1,000

1,360

1,500

1,900

There isn't enough information to tell


We want to test a large data set for normalcy using the empirical rule. The sample mean is 25, and the sample variance is 25. The data set is large enough that we think these are good estimates of the population parameters. If the data are normally distributed, we'd expect to find 68% of the observations between which two values?


(20,30)

(15,35)

(0,50)

(25,50)

(25,35)


If the range of a normally distributed data set is 25, what's a reasonable estimate for standard deviation?


1

2.5

5

10

All of these are reasonable estimates of the standard deviation


You believe that a normal quantile plot of 30 data points provides evidence that the original data is normally distributed. If this is true then the pattern of points on this normal quantile plot is:


bell-shaped

u-shaped

a logarithmic curve

randomly scattered in the plot

None of the above

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