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(MC) Question refers to the excerpt below. "The homes of the Indians were copied by the English, being ready adaptations of natural and...

1.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"The homes of the Indians were copied by the English, being ready adaptations of natural and plentiful resources. Wigwams in the South were of plaited rush or grass mats; of deerskins pinned on a frame; of tree boughs rudely piled into a cover, and in the far South, of layers of palmetto leaves. In the mild climate of the Middle and Southern states a 'half-faced camp,' of the Indian form, with one open side, which served for windows and door, and where the fire was built, made a good temporary home. In such for a time, in his youth, lived Abraham Lincoln. Bark wigwams were the most easily made of all; they could be quickly pinned together on a light frame. In 1626 there were thirty home-buildings of Europeans on the island of Manhattan, now New York, and all but one of them were of bark."—Alice Morse Earle, Home Life in Colonial Days, 1898


Americans Indians had significant, immediate influence on the colonists and their communities on the Atlantic Seaboard because (1 point)


permanent villages aided the colonists in forming political alliances and allocating resources found in the Americas

 

the colonists arrived with a need to build shelters but didn't understand the materials or tools available

 

the weather conditions on the Atlantic Seaboard were foreign to the colonists, and they sought help from the native peoples

 

they were familiar with the farming techniques that the colonists needed to establish their permanent communities

2.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"Throughout all that country, wherever it is mountainous, we saw many signs of gold, antimony, iron, copper and other metals. Where the permanent houses are it is so hot that even in January the air is very warm ... The Indians who live in permanent houses and those in the rear of them pay no attention to gold nor silver, nor have they any use for either of these metals."—The Journey of Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, 1527-1537 Exploration in Southwest California & Mexico


The details of reports such as Cabeza de Vaca's led to which of the following? (1 point)


Limits on future voyages to explore lands of the Western Hemisphere as they were too dangerous

 

Prioritization of spreading the Catholic faith over pursuing economic gains for Spain

 

The belief that expansion in the Americas would lead to an increase in Spanish wealth and power

 

Weakening of investments in European conquests in favor of Western Hemisphere conquests

3.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"Fourthly, Because the way of conquering them is much more easie then of ciuilizing them by faire meanes, for they are a rude, barbarous, and naked people, scattered in small companies, which are helps to Victorie, but hinderances to Ciuilitie: Besides that, a conquest may be of many, and at once; but ciuility is in particular, and slow, the effect of long time, and great industry. Moreouer, victorie of them may bee gained many waies; by force, by surprize, by famine in burning their Corne, by destroying and burning their Boats, Canoes, and Houses."—Edward Waterhouse, from "A Declaration of the State of the Colony and ... A Relation of the Barbarous Massacre," a report to the Virginia Company, 1622


This excerpt most clearly exemplifies unfair treatment of native groups based on the colonists' (1 point)


need for increasing options for trade

 

perception of their own innate superiority

 

superior military experience abroad

 

understanding of the natives' systems of trade

4.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"And whereas great Quantities of the like Manufactures have of late been made and are daily increasing in the Kingdom of Ireland and in the English Plantations in America and are exported from thence to Forreigne Marketts heretofore supplyed from England which will inevitably sink the Value of Lands and tend to the ruine of the Trade and the Woollen Manufactures of this Realme ... Be it enacted by the Kings most Excellent Majesty by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spirituall and Temporall and Commons in this present Parliament assembled and by the Authority of the same:


That no Person or Persons ... shall directly or indirectly export ... out of or from the said Kingdom of Ireland into any Forreigne Realme States or Dominions ... other than the Parts within the Kingdom of England."—Wool Act, 1699


Which of these reasons for the enactment of Parliamentary laws such as the Wool Act is true? (1 point)


England believed its exports to be of superior quality and worth more to them than potential funds from colonial trade.

 

England wanted to inhibit industry growth in the colonies to prevent further slave trade between Africa and the colonies.

 

England was more interested in preserving the tax revenues from its own goods and expanding its own wealth than in growing industries in the colonies.

 

England was not concerned with controlling any colonial industries or economies as they were insignificant to England's market share.

5.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"And whereas great Quantities of the like Manufactures have of late been made and are daily increasing in the Kingdom of Ireland and in the English Plantations in America and are exported from thence to Forreigne Marketts heretofore supplyed from England which will inevitably sink the Value of Lands and tend to the ruine of the Trade and the Woollen Manufactures of this Realme ... Be it enacted by the Kings most Excellent Majesty by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spirituall and Temporall and Commons in this present Parliament assembled and by the Authority of the same:


That no Person or Persons ... shall directly or indirectly export ... out of or from the said Kingdom of Ireland into any Forreigne Realme States or Dominions ... other than the Parts within the Kingdom of England."—Wool Act, 1699


In response to wanting to raise tax revenue on its exports and increase control over the colonies, the British Parliament (1 point)


criminalized the rampant piracy in the Atlantic

 

enacted mercantilist practices

 

limited slave trade between Africa and the colonies

 

revised the taxation standards

6.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"And whereas great Quantities of the like Manufactures have of late been made and are daily increasing in the Kingdom of Ireland and in the English Plantations in America and are exported from thence to Forreigne Marketts heretofore supplyed from England which will inevitably sink the Value of Lands and tend to the ruine of the Trade and the Woollen Manufactures of this Realme ... Be it enacted by the Kings most Excellent Majesty by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spirituall and Temporall and Commons in this present Parliament assembled and by the Authority of the same:


That no Person or Persons ... shall directly or indirectly export ... out of or from the said Kingdom of Ireland into any Forreigne Realme States or Dominions ... other than the Parts within the Kingdom of England."—Wool Act, 1699


Even after the British Parliament enacted policies like the Wool Act of 1699, how did the colonial industries continue to thrive? (1 point)


Active piracy

 

Salutary neglect

 

Raising prices

 

Superior quality

7.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"So that Christianity is not like to gain much ground among the Savages, till the Colonies are ftrengthened by a great Number of Inhabitants, Artifans and workmen, and then the Treaty betwixt the Barbarians and us fhould be freer, and extended to all Europeans: But chiefly it fhould be endeavour'd to fix the Barbarians to a certain dwelling Place, and introduce our Cuftoms and Laws amongft them, further'd by the Affiftance of zealous People in Europe, Colleges might be founded to breed up the young Savages in the Chriffian Faith, which might in time contribute very much to the Converflon of their Country-men. This is a very proper Method without doubt, to ftrengthen the Temporal and Spiritual Intereffs of the Colonies; but the generality of Mankind are bent upon Gain and Traffick, and are little concern'd to procure God's Bleffing upon them, and endeavour the advancement of his Glory."—Louis Hennepin, from A New Discovery of a Vast Country in America, 17th century


The excerpt would be most useful to historians as a source of information about which of the following? (1 point)


The evolution of religion as a means to facilitate economic growth in the colonies

 

The role that colonists played in encouraging further migration of Europeans

 

The concerns of colonists who feared the loss of their European heritage

 

The development of blended English and Native settlements in the 17th century

8.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"For the increase of the shipping and the encouragement of the navigation of this nation, which under the good providence and protection of God is so great a means of the welfare and safety of this Commonwealth: be it enacted by this present Parliament, and the authority thereof, that from and after the first day of December, one thousand six hundred fifty and one, and from thence forwards, no goods or commodities whatsoever of the growth, production or manufacture of Asia, Africa or America, or of any part thereof; or of any islands belonging to them, ... shall be imported or brought into this Commonwealth of England, ... in any other ship or ships, vessel or vessels whatsoever, but only in such as do truly and without fraud belong only to the people of this Commonwealth, ... under the penalty of the forfeiture and loss of all the goods that shall be imported contrary to this act."—Navigation Act, 1651


Proclamations like the Navigation Act were evidence of Britain's growing (1 point)


conflicted response to treatment of Native Americans

 

fierce response to colonial boycotts of British goods

 

inability to control the seas and trade

 

indifference to colonial governance

9.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"And whereas it is just and reasonable, and essential to our Interest, and the Security of our Colonies, that the several Nations or Tribes of Indians ... should not be molested or disturbed in the Possession of such Parts of Our Dominions and Territories as, not having been ceded to or purchased by Us, are reserved to them ... We do therefore, with the Advice of our Privy Council, declare it to be our Royal Will and Pleasure, that no Governor or Commander in Chief ... in any of our other Colonies or Plantations in America do presume for the present, and until our further Pleasure be known, to grant Warrants of Survey, or pass Patents for any Lands ... which, not having been ceded to or purchased by Us as aforesaid, are reserved to the said Indians, or any of them."—Proclamation of 1763


Which of the following most consistently undermined the protections for American Indian lands in the 18th century? (1 point)


Colonial pressures westward

 

Disputes among the Pennsylvania tribes

 

French expansion of trade

 

Weak enforcement by the British

10.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"And whereas it is just and reasonable, and essential to our Interest, and the Security of our Colonies, that the several Nations or Tribes of Indians ... should not be molested or disturbed in the Possession of such Parts of Our Dominions and Territories as, not having been ceded to or purchased by Us, are reserved to them ... We do therefore, with the Advice of our Privy Council, declare it to be our Royal Will and Pleasure, that no Governor or Commander in Chief ... in any of our other Colonies or Plantations in America do presume for the present, and until our further Pleasure be known, to grant Warrants of Survey, or pass Patents for any Lands ... which, not having been ceded to or purchased by Us as aforesaid, are reserved to the said Indians, or any of them."—Proclamation of 1763


The attitude of the British Monarchy toward the colonies, as evident in the Proclamation of 1763, influenced which of the following political shifts? (1 point)


Colonial movement toward independence

 

Beginning of salutary neglect

 

First Great Awakening

 

Spread of the Enlightenment

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