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(MC) Question refers to the excerpt below. "And whereas it is just and reasonable, and essential to our Interest, and the Security of our...

11.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"And whereas it is just and reasonable, and essential to our Interest, and the Security of our Colonies, that the several Nations or Tribes of Indians ... should not be molested or disturbed in the Possession of such Parts of Our Dominions and Territories as, not having been ceded to or purchased by Us, are reserved to them ... We do therefore, with the Advice of our Privy Council, declare it to be our Royal Will and Pleasure, that no Governor or Commander in Chief ... in any of our other Colonies or Plantations in America do presume for the present, and until our further Pleasure be known, to grant Warrants of Survey, or pass Patents for any Lands ... which, not having been ceded to or purchased by Us as aforesaid, are reserved to the said Indians, or any of them."—Proclamation of 1763


The phrase from the Proclamation of 1763 that states "that no Governor or Commander in Chief ... in any of our other Colonies or Plantations in America do presume for the present" reflects which of the following? (1 point)


A trend toward peaceful relations with American Indian tribes in the colonies

 

A period of reduction in the westward migration

 

British sentiment that colonial leadership should halt expansion efforts

 

Recent conflicts between Britain and France over settlements

12.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpts below.


"I. Natural Rights of the Colonists as Men. All men have a right to remain in a state of nature as long as they please; and in case of intolerable oppression, civil or religious, to leave the society they belong to, and enter into another.


When men enter into society, it is by voluntary consent; and they have a right to demand and insist upon the performance of such conditions and previous limitations as form an equitable original compact.


Every natural right not expressly given up, or, from the nature of a social compact, necessarily ceded, remains."—The Rights of the Colonists, Samuel Adams, 1772


"So that the social pact will not become meaningless words, it tacitly includes this commitment, which alone gives power to the others: Whoever refuses to obey the general will shall be forced to obey it by the whole body politic, which means nothing else but that he will be forced to be free. This condition is indeed the one which by dedicating each citizen to the fatherland gives him a guarantee against being personally dependent on other individuals. It is the condition which all political machinery depends on and which alone makes political undertakings legitimate. Without it, political actions become absurd, tyrannical, and subject to the most outrageous abuses."—Jean Jacques Rousseau, The Social Contract, 1763


Which portion of these texts most clearly reflects ideas found in the Declaration of Independence and espoused by Enlightened philosophers? (1 point)


Every natural right not expressly given up, or, from the nature of a social compact, necessarily ceded, remains

 

Whoever refuses to obey the general will shall be forced to obey it by the whole body politic

 

It is the condition which all political machinery depends on and which alone makes political undertakings legitimate

 

When men enter into society, it is by voluntary consent; and they have a right to demand and insist upon the performance of such conditions

13.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpts below.


"I. Natural Rights of the Colonists as Men. All men have a right to remain in a state of nature as long as they please; and in case of intolerable oppression, civil or religious, to leave the society they belong to, and enter into another.


When men enter into society, it is by voluntary consent; and they have a right to demand and insist upon the performance of such conditions and previous limitations as form an equitable original compact.


Every natural right not expressly given up, or, from the nature of a social compact, necessarily ceded, remains."—The Rights of the Colonists, Samuel Adams, 1772


"So that the social pact will not become meaningless words, it tacitly includes this commitment, which alone gives power to the others: Whoever refuses to obey the general will shall be forced to obey it by the whole body politic, which means nothing else but that he will be forced to be free. This condition is indeed the one which by dedicating each citizen to the fatherland gives him a guarantee against being personally dependent on other individuals. It is the condition which all political machinery depends on and which alone makes political undertakings legitimate. Without it, political actions become absurd, tyrannical, and subject to the most outrageous abuses."—Jean Jacques Rousseau, The Social Contract, 1763


Which of the following expresses the ideas presented in Samuel Adams's text? (1 point)


The creation of the Bill of Rights

 

The dissolution of state constitutions

 

The enforcement of the Northwest Ordinance

 

The discontinuance of the Articles of Confederation

14.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpts below.


"I. Natural Rights of the Colonists as Men. All men have a right to remain in a state of nature as long as they please; and in case of intolerable oppression, civil or religious, to leave the society they belong to, and enter into another.


When men enter into society, it is by voluntary consent; and they have a right to demand and insist upon the performance of such conditions and previous limitations as form an equitable original compact.


Every natural right not expressly given up, or, from the nature of a social compact, necessarily ceded, remains."—The Rights of the Colonists, Samuel Adams, 1772


"So that the social pact will not become meaningless words, it tacitly includes this commitment, which alone gives power to the others: Whoever refuses to obey the general will shall be forced to obey it by the whole body politic, which means nothing else but that he will be forced to be free. This condition is indeed the one which by dedicating each citizen to the fatherland gives him a guarantee against being personally dependent on other individuals. It is the condition which all political machinery depends on and which alone makes political undertakings legitimate. Without it, political actions become absurd, tyrannical, and subject to the most outrageous abuses."—Jean Jacques Rousseau, The Social Contract, 1763


Concepts of natural rights continued to prove difficult to live up to, as evidenced in (1 point)


constitutional compromises that strengthened the power of the president

 

constitutional compromises to side-step issues related to slavery

 

the formation of groups advocating the abolition of slavery

 

the reduction of controls over interstate exports and taxes

15.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"To the People of the State of New York: 

There are again two methods of removing the causes of faction: the one, by destroying the liberty which is essential to its existence; the other, by giving to every citizen the same opinions, the same passions, and the same interests.


It could never be more truly said than of the first remedy, that it was worse than the disease. Liberty is to faction what air is to fire, an aliment without which it instantly expires. But it could not be less folly to abolish liberty, which is essential to political life, because it nourishes faction, than it would be to wish the annihilation of air, which is essential to animal life, because it imparts to fire its destructive agency."—James Madison, The Federalist No. 10, 1787


The commitment to liberty described in The Federalist No. 10 was evidenced by which of the following in the 1830s? (1 point)


A rapidly growing economy that outpaced the federal government's ability to protect freedoms

 

A growing aristocratic class that manipulated constitutional provisions to their benefit

 

Development of regional loyalties and debates about authority of the federal government

 

Growing influence of international trade on the limitations of decentralized government

16.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"To the People of the State of New York: 

There are again two methods of removing the causes of faction: the one, by destroying the liberty which is essential to its existence; the other, by giving to every citizen the same opinions, the same passions, and the same interests.


It could never be more truly said than of the first remedy, that it was worse than the disease. Liberty is to faction what air is to fire, an aliment without which it instantly expires. But it could not be less folly to abolish liberty, which is essential to political life, because it nourishes faction, than it would be to wish the annihilation of air, which is essential to animal life, because it imparts to fire its destructive agency."—James Madison, The Federalist No. 10, 1787


The focus in The Federalist No. 10 shares support for which of the following with Romanticism and the Second Great Awakening? (1 point)


The idea that government could solve all social problems

 

The ideas of self-determination and societal improvement

 

The idea that nature could redeem personal loss and create wealth

 

The ideas of individuality and spiritual unity

17.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"We learn that extraordinary excitement was occasioned at Lowell, last week, by an announcement that the wages paid in some of the departments would be reduced 15 percent on the 1st of March. The reduction principally affected the female operatives, and they held several meetings, or caucuses, at which a young woman presided, who took an active part in persuading her associates to give notice that they should quit the mills, and to induce them to 'make a run' on the Lowell Bank and the Savings Bank, which they did. On Friday morning, the young woman referred to was dismissed, by the Agent ... and on leaving the office ... waved her calash in the air, as a signal to the others, who were watching from the windows, when they immediately 'struck' and assembled about her, in despite of the overseers. The number soon increased to nearly 800. A procession was formed, and they marched about the town."—The Boston Transcript, "Turnout in Lowell," 1834


The story described in the excerpt reflects which of the following issues typical of the market revolution? (1 point)


Increased value of workers due to immigration

 

Limited value placed on workers' rights

 

Limited availability of skilled workers

 

Incentives to retain an important workforce

18.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"We learn that extraordinary excitement was occasioned at Lowell, last week, by an announcement that the wages paid in some of the departments would be reduced 15 percent on the 1st of March. The reduction principally affected the female operatives, and they held several meetings, or caucuses, at which a young woman presided, who took an active part in persuading her associates to give notice that they should quit the mills, and to induce them to 'make a run' on the Lowell Bank and the Savings Bank, which they did. On Friday morning, the young woman referred to was dismissed, by the Agent ... and on leaving the office ... waved her calash in the air, as a signal to the others, who were watching from the windows, when they immediately 'struck' and assembled about her, in despite of the overseers. The number soon increased to nearly 800. A procession was formed, and they marched about the town."—The Boston Transcript, "Turnout in Lowell," 1834


Changes like those described in the excerpt were a result of social and gender-related shifts that occurred during the (1 point)


Communications Revolution

 

Market Revolution

 

New National Culture Revolution

 

Technological Innovation Revolution

19.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"The denouement has been happy: and I confess I look to this duplication of area for the extending a government so free and economical as ours, as a great achievement to the mass of happiness which is to ensue. Whether we remain in one confederacy, or form into Atlantic and Mississippi confederacies, I believe not very important to the happiness of either part. Those of the western confederacy will be as much our children and descendants as those of the eastern, and I feel myself as much identified with that country, in future time, as with this: and did I now foresee a separation at some future day, yet I should feel the duty and the desire to promote the western interests as zealously as the eastern, doing all the good for both portions of our future family which should fall within my power."—Thomas Jefferson, "Letter IX—To Doctor Priestly," January 29, 1804


The main benefit of the "duplication of area" Jefferson describes in his letter was which of the following? (1 point)


Expansion facilitated the broadening of economic enterprise.

 

Increasing lands would be used for relocating American Indian tribes.

 

Expansion allowed economic balance between North and South.

 

Neutral ground was needed to balance slave states.

20.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpts below.


"Considering that a great part of the territories ... within the limits of the United States, is now occupied by savage tribes, who will hereafter be under the exclusive control of the Government of the United States, and whose incursions within the territory of Mexico would be prejudicial in the extreme, it is solemnly agreed that all such incursions shall be forcibly restrained by the Government of the United States whensoever this may be necessary; and ... they shall be punished by the said Government ... as if the same incursions were meditated or committed within its own territory, against its own citizens."—Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, Article XI, 1848


"SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That the right of way through the public lands be, and the same is hereby, granted to said company for the construction of said railroad and telegraph line; and the right, power, and authority is hereby given to said company to take from the public lands adjacent to the line of said road, earth, stone, timber, and other materials for the construction thereof; said right of way is granted to said railroad to the extent of two hundred feet in width on each side of said railroad where it may pass over the public lands ... The United States shall extinguish as rapidly as may be the Indian titles to all lands falling under the operation of this act and required for the said right of way and; grants hereinafter made."—Pacific Railway Act, 1862


Acquisitions for the Pacific Railway and expansion into regions held by Mexico via the Treaty of Guadeloupe Hidalgo both reflected the (1 point)


belief that Americans had inherent rights to the land

 

development of immigrant rights groups advocating minority sanctuaries

 

desire of Americans to create regions of safety for American Indian groups

 

influence of trade with regions in the Western Pacific

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