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(MC) Question refers to the excerpt below.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"For the success of the efforts now making to introduce among the Indians the customs and pursuits of civilized life and gradually to absorb them into the mass of our citizens, sharing their rights and holden to their responsibilities, there is imperative need for legislative action ...


Of even greater importance is a measure ... The enactment of a general law permitting the allotment in severalty, to such Indians, at least, as desire it, of a reasonable quantity of land secured to them by patent, and for their own protection made inalienable for twenty or twenty-five years, is demanded for their present welfare and their permanent advancement ...


The well-attested reports of their increasing interest in husbandry justify the hope and belief that the enactment of such a statute as I recommend would be at once attended with gratifying results. A resort to the allotment system would have a direct and powerful influence in dissolving the tribal bond, which is so prominent a feature of savage life, and which tends so strongly to perpetuate it."—Chester A. Arthur, from his First Annual Message, December 6, 1881


Supporters of Arthur's solution to the state of American Indian affairs would most likely believe in a (1 point)


federal process to Americanize immigrants

 

version of America that included many nationalities and races

 

need for diversity in a country recently at war over slavery

 

military solution to growing unrest in the West

32.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"For the success of the efforts now making to introduce among the Indians the customs and pursuits of civilized life and gradually to absorb them into the mass of our citizens, sharing their rights and holden to their responsibilities, there is imperative need for legislative action ...


Of even greater importance is a measure ... The enactment of a general law permitting the allotment in severalty, to such Indians, at least, as desire it, of a reasonable quantity of land secured to them by patent, and for their own protection made inalienable for twenty or twenty-five years, is demanded for their present welfare and their permanent advancement ...


The well-attested reports of their increasing interest in husbandry justify the hope and belief that the enactment of such a statute as I recommend would be at once attended with gratifying results. A resort to the allotment system would have a direct and powerful influence in dissolving the tribal bond, which is so prominent a feature of savage life, and which tends so strongly to perpetuate it."—Chester A. Arthur, from his First Annual Message, December 6, 1881


Arthur's proposal includes introducing farming techniques that would not only acculturate American Indians to a "civilized life" but also provide (1 point)


a labor-intensive system that would pacify native leaders

 

a replacement for dwindling resources like the buffalo

 

an option to learn a trade that would lead to gainful employment

 

an additional way to support the nation's growing urban centers

33.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"If our great corporations would more scrupulously observe their legal limitations and duties, they would have less cause to complain of the unlawful limitations of their rights or of violent interference with their operations. The community that by concert, open or secret, among its citizens denies to a portion of its members their plain rights under the law has severed the only safe bond of social order and prosperity. Those who use unlawful methods, if moved by no higher motive than the selfishness that prompted them, may well stop and inquire what is to be the end of this."—Benjamin Harrison, from his Inaugural Address, March 4, 1889


Harrison's speech and its emphasis on the effects of corporate abuse would be a criticism of (1 point)


government regulation of business

 

laissez-faire economic policy

 

socialist ideology

 

grassroots politics

34.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"If our great corporations would more scrupulously observe their legal limitations and duties, they would have less cause to complain of the unlawful limitations of their rights or of violent interference with their operations. The community that by concert, open or secret, among its citizens denies to a portion of its members their plain rights under the law has severed the only safe bond of social order and prosperity. Those who use unlawful methods, if moved by no higher motive than the selfishness that prompted them, may well stop and inquire what is to be the end of this."—Benjamin Harrison, from his Inaugural Address, March 4, 1889


Reformist sentiments as seen in the Social Gospel were most directly targeted at the (1 point)


"unlawful limitations" of the rights of corporations

 

denial of community members' "plain rights under the law"

 

demoralization of "those who practice" corporate selfishness

 

need for more "violent interference" with corporate operations

35.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpts below.


"All that we do seeks to fulfill the historic traditions of the American people. Other nations may sacrifice democracy for the transitory stimulation of old and discredited autocracies. We are restoring confidence and well-being under the rule of the people themselves. We remain, as John Marshall said a century ago, 'emphatically and truly, a government of the people.' Our government 'in form and in substance ... emanates from them. Its powers are granted by them, and are to be exercised directly on them, and for their benefits.'" —Franklin D. Roosevelt, from his Fireside Chat "Review of the Achievements of the Seventy-third Congress," June 28, 1934


"In our generation, a new idea has come to dominate thought about government, the idea that the resources of the nation can be made to produce a far higher standard of living for the masses of the people if only government is intelligent and energetic in giving the right direction to economic life. That ideal makes understandable the demands of labor for shorter hours and higher wages, the demands of farmers for a more stable income, the demands of the great majority of business men for relief from disruptive trade practices, the demands of all for the end of that kind of license, often mistermed 'Liberty,' which permits a handful of the population to take far more than its tolerable share from the rest of the people."—Franklin D. Roosevelt, from his "Address on Constitution Day," September 17, 1937


Roosevelt's emphasis in both excerpts reflects the cultural demand for reforms such as (1 point)


a stronger financial regulatory system

 

broader access to natural resources

 

expansion of voting rights to women

 

limits on exports of consumer goods

36.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"With these examples in two widely-separated parts of the country, the old and the new, representing not only crystallized prejudice in the one but inborn opposition in both to any step toward enfranchising women, and with this depending absolutely on the will of the voters, is it a matter of wonder that its progress has been so slow? If the question were submitted in any State to-day whether, for instance, all who did not pay taxes should be disfranchised, and only taxpayers were allowed to vote upon it, it would be carried by a large majority. If it were submitted whether all owning property above a certain amount should be disfranchised, and only those who owned less than this, or nothing, were allowed to vote, it would be carried unanimously. No class of men could get any electoral right whatever if it depended wholly on the consent of another class whose interests supposedly lay in withholding it."—From The History of Woman Suffrage, Vol. IV, edited by Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper


This excerpt would be most useful to historians as a source of information about which of the following? (1 point)


The role of male minorities in the suffrage movement

 

The organizational process that led to major suffrage groups

 

The prevailing attitudes that affected the suffrage movement

 

The realities of daily and economic life for suffragettes

37.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpts below.


"All that we do seeks to fulfill the historic traditions of the American people. Other nations may sacrifice democracy for the transitory stimulation of old and discredited autocracies. We are restoring confidence and well-being under the rule of the people themselves. We remain, as John Marshall said a century ago, 'emphatically and truly, a government of the people.' Our government 'in form and in substance. ... emanates from them. Its powers are granted by them, and are to be exercised directly on them, and for their benefits.'"—Franklin D. Roosevelt, from his Fireside Chat "Review of the Achievements of the Seventy-third Congress," June 28, 1934


"In our generation, a new idea has come to dominate thought about government, the idea that the resources of the nation can be made to produce a far higher standard of living for the masses of the people if only government is intelligent and energetic in giving the right direction to economic life. That ideal makes understandable the demands of labor for shorter hours and higher wages, the demands of farmers for a more stable income, the demands of the great majority of business men for relief from disruptive trade practices, the demands of all for the end of that kind of license, often mistermed 'Liberty,' which permits a handful of the population to take far more than its tolerable share from the rest of the people."—Franklin D. Roosevelt, from his "Address on Constitution Day," September 17, 1937


Which of the following describes the result(s) of Roosevelt's relief policies mentioned in these excerpts? (1 point)


Increased deficit spending; few regulations succeeded in reforming the stock market

 

Increased economic upheaval; Supreme Court decisions reversing the New Deal

 

Minor improvement to the economy; lasting expansion of social protections

 

No real effect on the economy; lasting improvement of the plight of farmers

38.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"I think we now have sufficient population in our country for us to shut the door and to breed up a pure, unadulterated American citizenship. I recognize that there is a dangerous lack of distinction between people of a certain nationality and the breed of the dog ... If you were to go abroad and some one were to meet you and say, 'I met a typical American,' what would flash into your mind as a typical American, the typical representative of that new Nation? Would it be the son of an Italian immigrant, the son of a German immigrant, the son of any of the breeds from the Orient, the son of the denizens of Africa? ... Thank God we have in America perhaps the largest percentage of any country in the world of the pure, unadulterated Anglo-Saxon stock ... I would make this not an asylum for the oppressed of all countries, but a country to assimilate and perfect that splendid type of manhood that has made America the foremost Nation."—Ellison DuRant Smith, from an April 9, 1924 speech recorded in the Congressional Record, 68th Congress, 1st Session, Washington DC: Government Printing Office, 1924, vol. 65, 5961−5962


Smith's reference to "pure, unadulterated Anglo-Saxon stock" most clearly reflects which of the following? (1 point)


Cultural trend to privilege native-born citizens

 

Cultural awareness of the growing threat of Communism

 

Movements to reform tenement housing for immigrants

 

Pressure to rescind immigration quota laws

39.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"I think we now have sufficient population in our country for us to shut the door and to breed up a pure, unadulterated American citizenship. I recognize that there is a dangerous lack of distinction between people of a certain nationality and the breed of the dog ... If you were to go abroad and some one were to meet you and say, 'I met a typical American,' what would flash into your mind as a typical American, the typical representative of that new Nation? Would it be the son of an Italian immigrant, the son of a German immigrant, the son of any of the breeds from the Orient, the son of the denizens of Africa? ... Thank God we have in America perhaps the largest percentage of any country in the world of the pure, unadulterated Anglo-Saxon stock ... I would make this not an asylum for the oppressed of all countries, but a country to assimilate and perfect that splendid type of manhood that has made America the foremost Nation."—Ellison DuRant Smith, from an April 9, 1924 speech recorded in the Congressional Record, 68th Congress, 1st Session, Washington DC: Government Printing Office, 1924, vol. 65, 5961−5962


Sentiments described in Smith's speech most directly resulted in which of the following developments in the early 20th century? (1 point)


Development of migrant labor unions

 

Hierarchical employment programs based on immigration status

 

Immigration reform that focused on housing

 

Passage of restrictive immigration quotas

40.

(MC)

Question refers to the excerpt below.


"I think we now have sufficient population in our country for us to shut the door and to breed up a pure, unadulterated American citizenship. I recognize that there is a dangerous lack of distinction between people of a certain nationality and the breed of the dog ... If you were to go abroad and some one were to meet you and say, 'I met a typical American,' what would flash into your mind as a typical American, the typical representative of that new Nation? Would it be the son of an Italian immigrant, the son of a German immigrant, the son of any of the breeds from the Orient, the son of the denizens of Africa? ... Thank God we have in America perhaps the largest percentage of any country in the world of the pure, unadulterated Anglo-Saxon stock ... I would make this not an asylum for the oppressed of all countries, but a country to assimilate and perfect that splendid type of manhood that has made America the foremost Nation."—Ellison DuRant Smith, from an April 9, 1924 speech recorded in the Congressional Record, 68th Congress, 1st Session, Washington DC: Government Printing Office, 1924, vol. 65, 5961−5962


Racial tensions in the early 1900s helped contribute to (1 point)


economic dislocations following World Wars I and II

 

the development of new technologies to improve standards of living

 

the Great Migration of African Americans to the North

 

legalized segregation in the South

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