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Chapter 7 Demands and Expectations Stressors originate in the complex interaction between socialization and perception. That is, they are...

I have 5 discussion forum and one assignment need to be done but I need discussion 8 tonight if you can  they must be MLA /APA FORMAT with references

I attached the instruction for the assignment if you confused please let me know. also I attached chapter from the text book .

Chapter 7 Demands and Expectations Stressors originate in the complex interaction between socialization and perception. That is, they are sociological events we may perceive as undesirable on the basis of our experiences or other learning processes. People and our relationship to them, along with our perception of the relationships, construct a fascinating mosaic that greatly affects our stress, health, and happiness. This chapter examines the stressful impact of the expectations that society in general, and people in particular, have on all of us. Five life processes appear to have strong connections with stress; they are as follows: (1) change and our relationship to our ever-changing life; (2) overload, or expectations accelerating out of control as we attempt to keep up with the fast-moving people and events in our lives; (3) frustration, or our inability to gain satisfaction from the people, events, and institutions in our lives; (4) boredom and loneliness, the failure of our relationships; and (5) the relationship interdynamic itself. We will examine these potential sources of distress and look at examples of how each touches our daily lives. Before you read each section, be sure to complete the self-assessment exercise that precedes it. These exercises help clarify the material that follows. Each section is followed by several effective stress management tools for you to try if you are vulnerable to any of these stressors. Change We are simultaneously experiencing a youth revolution, a racial revolution, a sexual revolution, a colonial revolution, an economic revolution, a war on terror revolution, and the most rapid and deep-going technological revolution in history. “Era of change” could be the single most descriptive phrase for the twentieth century. It appears that the twenty- first century can see only continued change, and at an even faster rate! Most of us have been reared with the belief that change is good and desirable, as it usually denotes an easier and more productive life. However, in his book Future Shock, Alvin Toffler (1970) foresaw that even though change is a necessary element in societal behavior, if it is too intense or too massive, the participants may cease reaping its rewards and begin realizing how devastating it can be. Although Toffler spoke somewhat as a philosopher and social critic, the scientific literature strongly supports his contentions. Adaptive stress occurs when life situations demand that change occur and we must try to keep up with it. In the modern industrial world, change is seen as “the end” of a period of stability or security of some kind and is therefore related to fear. Even when change is desired, movement from the old situation in which comfort and security have been established is somewhat stressful. The philosophical concept of change is that it is the only constant and is to be expected, not feared. In our society, in which change occurs quickly, there is little emphasis on the transition between the old and the new.
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Your health, and even your very survival, are based largely on your body’s ability to maintain a healthy balance of mental and physical processes. This equilibrium is called homeostasis. It has been suggested that excessive change is harmful to health because it tends to destroy homeostasis and thereby force the body to restore homeostasis through adaptation. Homeostasis: Equilibrium in the internal functions of the body Allostasis: Adapted equilibrium in the internal functions of the body Adaptation: The body’s tendency to fight to restore homeostasis, or perhaps allostasis, in the face of forces that upset this natural bodily balance Life Events In the early 1960s, Thomas H. Holmes and Richard H. Rahe attempted to discover whether change had major effects on human health. Generic change—that is, change having either positive or negative consequences—was the focus of their research. Based on earlier work by Adolph Meyer with “life charts” (paper-and-pencil tools for creating a medical biography), Holmes and Rahe compiled a list of positive and negative life events that seemed to contribute to the stress reaction. From these efforts emerged the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS), first published by Holmes and Rahe in 1968. This scale originally listed forty-three life events, and each carried a weighting indicating the amount of stress to be attributed to it. The weightings were determined by the sample populations they tested, and the weighting units were called life-change units (LCUs). The most highly weighted life event was the death of a spouse (100 LCUs), and the lowest-weighted event was a minor violation of the law (11 LCUs). Interestingly enough, outstanding personal achievement was weighted with 28 LCU, only one point less than trouble with in-laws! This points to one of the more important aspects of this study of life events: It concentrated on generic change, a force that causes stress through the destruction of homeostasis. Identify the potentially stressful changes in your life by filling out the following exercise. Remember, change, or the disruption of homeostasis, produces stress and adaptation, whether the event is desirable or undesirable. Negative or distressful events are usually the most harmful, for they are more disruptive for a longer period. They have a secondary effect in that they stimulate fear, self-doubt, catastrophic imaginings, and other negative thoughts that linger in the mind. However, positive events can likewise be stressful in that they also initiate change that necessitates adaptation. Usually, though (Girdano 143)
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Stress and Tension Discussion Forum 8 In Discussion Forum 8, post your response to the following discussion question. Reply to at least two classmates’ responses by the date indicated in the course Calendar. 1. Chapter 7 cites five life processes which “appear to have strong connections with stress. They are as follows: (1) change and our relationship to our ever-changing life; (2) overload, or expectations accelerating out of control as we attempt to keep up with the fast-moving people and events in our lives; (3) frustration, or our inability to gain satisfaction from the people, events, and institutions in our lives; (4) boredom and loneliness, the failure of our relationships; and (5) the relationship inter-dynamic itself.Which of these processes do you think causes the most stress in your life? Discuss that process, with personal examples, and identify any actions you might be reasonably able to take to help deal with the stress which arises from that process. 2. Some believe that change can be perceived as a normal process of living and can be an incentive for personal growth.Do you agree or disagree with this statement? Why or why not? If you agree, discuss how you have been able to use change for personal growth. If you disagree, that is you see change as more of a distress than an opportunity, reflect on and discuss whether you think there might be a possibility to change your view. Be sure to complete the self-Assessment exercises throughout Chapter 7 as you go along, as these will be necessary to complete the Stress Management Plan on time. Please respond to each of the above discussions separately, do not combine the two questions into one response. Label the discussion threads for each question as ‘Last name, Question #”. Discussion Forum 9 In Discussion Forum 9, post your response to the following discussion question. Reply to at least two classmates’ responses by the date indicated in the course Calendar. 3. Chapter eight (Introduction) mentions five environmental stimuli that may play a role in distress. These are: (1) body rhythms; (2) eating and drinking habits; (3) drugs, including alcohol and nicotine; (4) noise pollution; and (5) changes in climate and altitude. Which of the five do you think causes the most distress in your life? Discuss that stimulus, with personal examples, and identify any actions
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you might be reasonably able to do to deal with that stimulus. 4. In his book “The Paradox of Choice,” Barry Schwartz, a professor of Social Science at Swarthmore College, explains at what point “choice -- the hallmark of individual freedom and self-determination that we so cherish . ..” becomes a stressor. As an example he states in Chapter 1 that: Scanning the shelves of my local supermarket recently, I found 85 different varieties and brands of crackers. As I read the packages, I discovered that some brands had sodium, others didn"t Some were fat-free, others weren’t. They came in big boxes and small ones. They came in normal size and bite size. There were mundane saltines and exotic and expensive imports. (Schwartz, 2004) To what extent do you think that the multitude of choices which confront us everyday are significantly adding to your stresses? Try to give at least one specific example. Are there any interventions you can think of for your particular situation? Please respond to each of the above discussions separately, do not combine the two questions into one response. Label the discussion threads for each question as ‘Last name, Question #”. Discussion Forum 10: Stress Reduction Presentation - In Discussion Forum 10, post your Stress Reduction Presentation as an attachment, developed in Written Assignment 3. Reply to at least two classmates’ responses by the date indicated in the course Calendar 5. Label the posting with ‘Last name, WA3”. Discussion Forum 11 In Discussion Forum 11, post your response to the following discussion question. Reply to at least two classmates’ responses by the date indicated in the course Calendar. 6. The text (Chapter nine, Introduction) asserts that “relationships are the proving grounds upon which we show how well we have learned to manage stress.” Reflect on and discuss this statement, as always, with personal examples of successes in managing stress. In addition, if you are comfortable with it, provide a situation you’d consider less than successful. If appropriate, discuss why you succeeded in some relationship events and were not so
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Running head: DISCUSSION 1 Discussion
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Institution DISCUSSION 2
DF8; Surname: question 1 In modern day, there are many demands, deadlines and frustrations that come to our way.
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