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Identifying Plagiarism One way to help you learn how to avoid plagiarism is to learn how to recognize what it looks like. This Application asks you

Identifying Plagiarism

One way to help you learn how to avoid plagiarism is to learn how to recognize what it looks like. This Application asks you to judge if a piece of writing is plagiarized and make you more aware of what constitutes a violation of academic integrity policies.

To prepare for this Application:

  • Review the Learning Resources from Indiana University Bloomington, the Walden Writing Center, and resources related to quoting sources. We recommend that you practice identifying plagiarism by completing the plagiarism tutorial from Indiana University Bloomington.
  • Read the following source material (original) and then the paraphrase submitted by Student X.
  • After carefully considering what constitutes a good paraphrase and what is considered plagiarism, identify the portions of the student’s work that you believe are not properly quoted, cited, or paraphrased.
  • Then, to complete this assignment, write your own paraphrased summary of the source material. If you quote the exact words of the author, be sure to use quotation marks and cite the page number of the original. Limit your direct quote to one or two sentences at most. Your paraphrase can be a good bit shorter than the original if you focus on the ideas rather than the exact words.
  • APA Style Alert 1: If you cite Swanson, treat her as a secondary source, like this: (Swanson, as cited in Isenberg & Erdahl, 2011). Do not include the date with Swanson because you didn't read Swanson firsthand.
  • APA Style Alert 2: Remember to cite the literature in past tense: Isenberg and Erdahl (2011) suggested, argued, stated, wrote, concluded, and so forth. Use past tense.
Source material (original, p. 586): Student X Version:

Although incidence of head injuries among high school athletes has received increased attention in the popular press, there is no evidence that the actual rate of concussions among this population has changed over time. Only in the last 10 years have most states mandated that high school athletics departments must report sports-related concussions. The raw number of students who participate in high school athletics has nearly doubled since 1970 (Swanson, 2010), but the percentage of students who participate has remained nearly constant. Equipment designers have improved protective gear over the last quarter century, but high school athletes have grown stronger and heavier—a nd more dangerous—over the same time period. Furthermore, methods of accurately identifying the symptoms of concussions were less developed in the 20th century. Thus, researchers in the public health field have had little success in accurately measuring the long-term effects of high school students’ concussions on later academic achievement.

Reference:
Isenberg, M., & Erdahl, P. (2011). Effects of sports-related concussions on academic achievement. Journal of the Student Brain, 14, 575-589.

Isenberg and Erdahl (2011) wrote that head injuries among high school athletes have received increased attention in the popular media (p. 586). But the actual rate of concussions among high school athletes has not changed over time. Before 2000 states did not mandate high school athletics departments must report sports-related concussions. The actual number of students who participate in high school sports has doubled since 1970 (Swanson, 2010). The percentage of students who participate, however, has remained nearly the same (Isenberg & Erdahl, 2011). Although sports equipment is safer than it used to be, student athletics has become riskier as its participants have grown bigger. According to the authors, the symptoms of concussions are easier to recognize now than they were in the last century. For those reasons, measuring the long-term effects of high school students’ concussions on later academic achievement has been problematic for public health researchers (Isenberg & Erdahl, 2011).

Reference:
Isenberg, M., & Erdahl, P. (2011). Effects of sports-related concussions on academic achievement. Journal of the Student Brain, 14, 575-589.


The assignment:

By Day 7, in a 1- to 2-page paper, (a) clearly identify which portions of the students’ paper are plagiarized. (b) Then write your own paraphrased summary of the source material. If you quote the exact words of the author, be sure to use quotation marks and cite the page number of the original. Limit your use of direct quotes to one or two sentences at most. Remember that when you paraphrase, even if you cite your source you must come up with your own words. Your paraphrase can be a good bit shorter than the original if you focus on the ideas rather than the exact words.

  • Refer to the Learning Resources in this course to make sure that you do not plagiarize as you carry out this assignment.
  • Remember to provide a reference list for any source(s) you rely on for this assignment. 


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